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Sunday, June 30, 2013

What Does The Ghanaian Song "Tue Tue" REALLY Mean?

Edited by Azizi Powell

Anyone searching for a translation of the Ghanaian song "Tue Tue" (also known as "Tue Tue Barima" is bound to be very confused because there are widely conflicting translations of this song online.

As of June 29, 2012 there are ten YouTube videos of American [?] children singing "Tue Tue". There's also one video of a woman playing "Tue Tue" on the recorder. In all of these renditions of "Tue Tue" the tune is the same and the words vary only slightly. In most of these videos, "Tue Tue" is performed as a "round", and the tempo for a few of those renditions is faster than the tempo for other renditions.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/07/videos-of-song-tue-tue.html for a post which showcases five videos of "Tue Tue".

What all those posting videos & lyrics to this song agree on is that "Tue Tue" is an African song. All but one of the examples of this song that I've found to date indicate that "Tue Tue" is a Ghanaian song. That lone example is a version of this song entitled "Tue Tue Mareema" which purports to be from the Republic of Guinea. [Information about that song is found with Example #1 below.]

Some sites describe "Tue Tue" as a "traditional Ghanaian folk song" while others categorize it as a "Ghanaian children's song" - these song categories aren't always the same thing. Many websites which include lyrics for "Tue Tue" add the name of an arranger for that particular version of that song. No composer's name is given for this song which may suggest that it really is a traditional folk song. Also, I've yet to find information on how & when this song became known to English speaking people in the United States and elsewhere.

This post provides six text examples of "Tue Tue" that I've found on the internet, along with the meaning that those contributors gave to this song. Those meanings are given in italics to highlight that statement.

These examples are representative of the widely varying meanings that have been given to this song. I use the word "meanings" instead of "translations" because it's my sense that those adults who have taught this song were more interested in identifying a song that met their multicultural need for an African children's song with a lively rhythm & spirit than they were in determining what the individual words of the song might actually mean. That is fine if you believe that the words to the song have no actual meaning as is the case with Example #3 given below. But it seems to me that if the individual words of this song do indeed have a specific meaning in the Akan/Twi language from which the song is suppose to come, then we do children a disservice by "making up" a feel good meaning for those words & that song. Instead of using that opportunity to teach children something about a particular African language, teachers may be introducing or reinforcing the idea that Africans speak "gibberish".

Furthermore, if these examples are adaptations of a traditional Ghanaian song, then it seems to me that teachers should specify what the adaptations are. For example, since so many of these examples specify singing in a "round", children might believe that that style of singing is the way that song was traditionally sung in Ghana. But is that true? Also, accompanying this song with body pats might give children the impression that this song-and perhaps all African songs- are supposed to have such accompaniment. But is that true?

These concerns wouldn't be problematic if multiple examples of "African" songs were taught to children in American schools. However, that certainly isn't true. Given that "Tue Tue Barima" might be the only African song or one of very few other African songs that non-African children learn, it seems to me that we owe it to those children to make sure that the information shared about that song are correct. I believe that efforts should be made to ensure that the words of the song being taught are accurate. And indeed those words appear to be relatively consistent in the examples that I've found. But I'm far less concerned about getting the words "right" than I am concerned that people are "fudging" a feel good meaning for this song, or indicating that the song is a nonsense song whose words have no meaning, if those particular words- or some of those words- actually do mean something in the language from which the song comes.

These examples are not presented in any order of preference. Notice that in each of these examples no English words are sung.

Example #1:
[These lyrics came from a person who identified himself or herself as Ghanaian]
"Mawuli wrote:
March 20th, 2010 at 7:47 am

My dear, l am a ghanaian from the EWE tribe of Ghana.and your request is an ASHANTI language which l speak very well.
the right sentence will be/—- DUE DUE BARIMA DUE DUE
ABOFRA BA AMA WA DA WA
DUE DUE.

Simply means SORRY SENIOR MAN SORRY, THIS SMALL BOY HAD MADE YOU FALLEN FLAT SORRY SORRY.

English translation:
1.DUE DUE means sorry sorry
2.BARIMA means a man/young man/boy–(simply a male).
3.ABOFRA BA means a young boy/young girl.
4.AMA WA DA WAA means you have fallen flat or helpless.

Source: http://www.mamalisa.com/blog/can-anyone-help-with-the-song-tue-tue-from-ghana/ [hereafter known as Mama Lisa: Tue Tue]
-snip-
For what it's worth, the name "Mawuli" is a Ghanaian Ewe name which means "God exists".

On another page http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=3174&c=36, that site editor also credits Mawuli and wrote that "This song is spelled "Tue Tue Barima" or "Due Due Barima". The pronunciation is "doo-way doo-way".

On still another Mama Lisa page http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=3435&c=246, a contributor named Abi shared the very similar lyrics for a song entitled "Tue Tue Mareema". Abi also wrote that "I understand you have found a Ghanaian version of this song and you might find this information below of interest as well, as I know many versions exist of most African songs as it is, after all, the natural outcome of a mostly aural tradition.

...this is a song which accompanies the Moribyassa rhythm of the Malinke people from Northeast Guinea"."
-snip-
I'm not that concerned that there are slight changes in the lyrics of "Tue Tue" in the examples of that song that I've found online. What does raise my doubts about the African authenticity of the internet versions of this song that I've found are the widely diverging meanings that have been given to this song's lyrics.

****
Example #2:
..."anyone here know of the song/game Tue Tue? (pronounced "too-ay too-ay")

Tue Tue, barima tue tue (repeat)
Ambasa dow, ama dowa dowa tue tue (repeat)
Barima tue tue

(a little girl is selling rice cakes in the marketplace)

Children stand in a circle, performing a complicated hand clapping pattern:
clap twice
pat legs twice
clap twice
pat partner's hands twice
clap twice
pat legs twice
clap twice
pat neighbor's hands (person on the child's other side) twice

According to my source, this is done whilst side-stepping around the circle! My 5th graders can manage the patschen but only one group several years ago could add the footwork!

I learned this from Carolyn Parrott, director of the women's chorus Songweavers in Concord, NH. The year they performed this they had a woman from Ghana in the audience who came up to Carolyn after the concert with tears in her eyes, saying they had sung it exactly as she remembered it as a child. "
-Allison; 27 Jan 08 - 07:03 PM
Source: http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=108069&messages=60#2246567 [hereafter known as Mudcat: Tue Tue]
-snip-
Notice that the Ghanaian woman indicated that the song was sung the same way that she remembered it. This might mean that the tune & the words [but not the performance movements] were the same. Also, the blogger didn't write that the Ghanaian woman agreed with the statement about the song's meaning.

****
Example #3
"...With that, I'll leave you with the song that caused all the uproar among my students - Tue Tue, a nonsense song from Ghana.

Tue tue barima tue tue
Tue tue barima tue tue
Abofroda, ama dawa dawa tue tue
Abofroda, ama dawa dawa tue tue
Barima tue tue .... tue tue.

Consider adding two claps after the first and second lines. This song can also be sung in a round.
-Posted by MegMcelweeeatSaturday, May 26, 2007
Source: http://montessoribyhand.blogspot.com/2007/05/saturday-song-tue-tue.html

****
Example #4
Tue Tue (A round from Ghana proclaiming gratitude for food at harvest time)
Tue tue barima tue tue (Repeat)
A maza bo amma dawa dawa tue tue
A maza bo amma dawa dawa tue tue
Barima tue tue Barima tue tue
Tue Tue (Ghana)
Tue tue Berima tue tue
[tue tue bE Ri ma tue tue]
Abofuma amanawae tue tue
[a bo fu ma a ma na wa ye tue tue]

Source: http://www.bluejamcumbria.com/public_html/vocalunion/info/tue%20tue%20notes.pdf

Example #5
Traditional Ghanaian folksong, arr. Rachel Wadham
Yam it up! Tue, Tue is a traditional Ghanaian song about harvesting. This would fit perfectly into Harvest Festival assemblies and can be used to explore food and farming in Ghana
Tue tue Tue tue
Tue tue Tue tue
Abo fra ba a-ma da wa da wa tue tue
Abo fra ba a-ma da wa da wa tue tue
Tue tue Tue tue
Tue tue Tue tue

English translation:
We are thankful for our harvest
Do you want to come down to Ghana
Do you want to come along, brother
As we travel we'll sing our happy song
Source: http://www.oxfam.org.uk/~/media/Files/Education/Resources/Sing%20up/7_Tue_Tue.ashx

****
Example #6
"TUE TUE

Tue tue, barima tue tue
Tue tue, barima tue tue
Abofra ba ama dawa dawa
Tue tue
Abofra ba ama dawa dawa Tue tue
Barima tue tue
Barima tue tue
Barima tue tue
There are many different languages spoken in Ghana. Although the words of this song come from a combination of languages and have no particular meaning, they are rhythmic and up tempo. It is important to sing this song with lots of energy and spirit."

Source: http://nyuchildrenschorus.wordpress.com/2012/09/19/lyrics/.
-snip-
If the words to "Tue Tue" are made up of a combination of languages from Ghana, what are those languages, and why would a song whose words have no particular meaning -as is noted above- need to be made up from a combination of languages?

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RESULTS OF ONLINE AKAN (TWI) TO ENGLISH TRANSLATION
It occurred to me that an online Akan to English translation feature could determine which -if any- of the translations given above for the song "Tue Tue" were accurate. Here's the results of my translation efforts using http://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/tribes/translate_english_to_twi.php
[The Akan/Twi word is given first followed by its English translation.]

tue - [no English translation]
due due - condolences
barima - young boy
abofra (bofra) - child
Ama (ama) girl born on Saturday
wa - yɛ (yɛ) was
waa (waa) strip
da wa – never strip
da - never; not, rarely, seldom etc
-snip-
These translations seemed to me to be close to Example #1's translation with the big exception of the line "Ama Wa Da Waa" (whose meaning the Ghanaian contributor Mawuli gave as "you have fallen flat or helpless".

I tried to find the Akan words for "helpless" and for "fall":
helpless - no English translation
fall - powbere
-snip-
I then looked up the Akan word for "weak" as I thought that was close to the meaning of the word "helpless".
weak - bosaa; guahaa; mberɛw
-snip-
I then looked up the meaning of the English word "strip":
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/strip
"strip
transitive verb
1
a: to remove clothing, covering, or surface matter from
b: to deprive of possessions
c: to divest of honors, privileges, or functions
2
a: to remove extraneous or superficial matter
b: to remove furniture, equipment, or accessories
-snip-
If a word of that last line in this song means "strip", I wonder if "2a", does that line mean "removing all obstacles from the person's path?

I also didn't find any results for falling down or flat that were spelled like the words in that line from Example #1.

I then looked up Akan words that pertain to the harvest, thanks food themes that are mentioned in some of the "translations" of "Tue Tue" that are given above:
Harvest – [no translation result]
food - eduane, ediban, eduan
rice - mo
cake - keeki
praise - ayeyi
thank - aseda
to thank (thank) { da ase } verb; show appreciation

****
CONCLUSIONS
It seems that the translation given in Example #1 is the most accurate. However, the meaning of that last line "Ama wa da waa" is still unclear. If this is the "right" English translation for this song, and is this song "just" an apology to someone for making them trip & fall, or is this truly a nonsense song? I'm not sure, but from the results of those Akan to English translations, "Tue Tue" doesn't appear to be a song about selling rice cakes. Nor does those translations support the theories that "Tue Tue" is a harvest song about giving thanks.

Does it matter that the meaning isn't as warm & feel good as those "harvest song, praise for food" type meanings? I believe so for the reasons that I gave above. I think lack of knowledge about the Ghanaian culture coupled with a desire for a catchy multicultural addition to a school's repertoire and the desire for a "feel good" meaning were the probable reasons for the creation of another meaning for this song.

The widely diverging meanings given to "Tue Tue" makes me question the authenticity of this song. Is "Tue Tue" a real African song? If so, how was it actually sung in Ghana and/or any other African nation which might have variant forms of this song?

Although I like the spirit & the sound of the song "Tue Tue", if I were a music teacher, I'd be reluctant to teach this song to children until I knew for certain just what the words of that song really mean.

I'd love it if any folks who know Akan/Twi & English would confirm [in English] what the Akan lyrics for "Tue Tue" really are and what that song truly means. Thanks in advance.

****
Thanks to all those who I've quoted.

Thanks for visiting pancocojam.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Thursday, June 27, 2013

Barrington Levy - "Mandela You're Free" (with lyrics)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post is Part III of a series that showcases songs about South African activist, humanitarian, and former President of South Africa, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.

This post showcases the song "Mandela Free" by Barrington Levy. My transcription of the lyrics to this song is also included in this post. Additions & corrections are welcome.

Part I showcases two performances of South African musician/vocalist Hugh Masekela's "Bring Him Home" (also known as "Bring Back Nelson Mandela"). Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/06/hugh-masekela-bring-him-home-bring-back.html for that post.

Part II showcases the song "Free Nelson Mandela" by The Special AKA, a trio from the United Kingdom. Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/06/special-aka-free-nelson-mandela.html for that post for that post

The content of this post is presented for cultural, inspirational, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

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SHOWCASE SONG

Barrington Levy-Mandela Free



TheRebeloi12, Uploaded on May 15, 2009

Album: Turning Point Barrington Levy, clasico para los fans como yo de Barrington Levy jaja
WOO OH OH!!!!!

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LYRICS - MANDELA FREE
(Barrington Levy)

Woah yoee yoee yoeoh woah [2x]

Mandela Mandela Mandela you’re free [4x]

Ah they tryin to keep a good man down but they can’t
They tryin to keep a good man down but they can’t
They tryin to keep a good man down but they can’t

Let a shout because you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]
Holler out say you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]
Shout it out say you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]
Mandela you’re free

Mandela Mandela Mandela you’re free
Mandela Mandela Mandela you’re free

Many people don’t want to be in the struggle like this
Mandela take it to, take it to higher heights
and take it free
Now’s the time for him to be free and yes, he’s free
And all we Black folks love to see
that Mandela’s free

Holler out say you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]
Let a shout because you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]
Holler out say you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]
Mandela, you’re free.
Let a shout because you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]
Holler out say you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]
Cry it out because you love Mandela
Mandela, you’re free

Mandela Mandela Mandela you’re free [2x]

As the struggle goes on and on, he
stands
Truths, and rights, and justice stands for all
So let him free

Holler out say you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]
Let a shout because you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]
Holler out say you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]
Mandela, you’re free

Mandela Mandela Mandela you’re free [2x]

Woah say woah
[Woah]
Say woah
[Woah]
Singing woah
[woah]

It’s so nice
It’s so sweet
It’s so beautiful to see
that Mandela free

It’s so nice
It’s so sweet
It’s so beautiful to see
that Mandela free

Holler, holler, holler out
[Bah Bah]
Holler, holler, holler out
[Bah Bah]
Cry, cry, cry out
[Bah Bah]
Cry, cry, cry out

Let a shout because you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]
Holler out say you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]
Cry it out because you love Mandela
[Bah Bah]

Mandela Mandela Mandela you’re free [2]
Woah singing woah
sing woah
sing woah
-snip-
Transcription by Azizi Powell. Additions & corrections welcome.

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RELATED LINK
Click https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nelson_Mandela for information about Nelson Mandela (July 18, 1918).

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Thanks to Nelson Mandela for his positive role modeling & his life work. Thanks to Barrington Levy for composing & performing this song. Thanks also to the publisher of this sound file on YouTube.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Special AKA - "Free Nelson Mandela"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post is Part II of a series that showcases songs about South African activist, humanitarian, and former President of South Africa, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.

This post showcases the song "Free Nelson Mandela" by The Special AKA, a trio from the United Kingdom. The lyrics to that song are also included in this post.

Part I showcases two performances of Hugh Masekela's "Bring Him Home" (also known as "Bring Back Nelson Mandela"). Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/06/hugh-masekela-bring-him-home-bring-back.html for that post.

Part III of this series showcases the song "Mandela Free" by Barrington Levy. Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/06/barrington-levy-mandela-youre-free-with.html for that post.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, inspirational, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

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SHOWCASE SONG The Special AKA - Free Nelson Mandela - Formel 1 - 1983



mattervalley, Uploaded on Mar 21, 2011

The Special AKA - Free Nelson Mandela - Formel 1 - 1983

Music video by The Special AKA performing Nelson Mandela.
-snip-
Here's an excerpt of an article about this song from http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2013/06/nelson-mandela-and-the-most-potent-protest-song-ever-recorded/:
"To a generation of British kids who had never heard of him before “Free Nelson Mandela” is all they ever needed to know about the man. Fittingly, Jerry Dammers, who wrote the song, had no idea who he was until he attended an anti-apartheid concert in 1983. Had he then come up with something more hectoring or angry, it’s possible the anti-apartheid movement would have had a very different level of support throughout the 1980s. Certainly in South Africa the song was seized upon as an instant anthem for the African National Congress."

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LYRICS - "FREE NELSON MANDELA"
(Jerry Dammers)

Free Nelson Mandela
Free, free, free, free, free Nelson Mandela

Free Nelson Mandela
21 years in captivity
Shoes too small to fit his feet
His body abused but his mind is still free
Are you so blind that you cannot see? I said…
Free Nelson Mandela, I'm begging you
Free Nelson Mandela

Visited the causes at the AMC
Only one man in a large army
Are you so blind that you cannot see?
Are you so deaf that you cannot hear his plea?
Free Nelson Mandela, I'm begging you
Free Nelson Mandela

21 tears in captivity
Are you so blind that you cannot see?
Are you so deaf that you cannot hear?
Are you so dumb that you cannot speak? I said…
Free Nelson Mandela, I'm begging you
Free Nelson Mandela
Free Nelson Mandela, begging you, begging you please
Free Nelson Mandela, you got to, you got to, you got to free, you got to free, you got to free
Free Nelson Mandela
Free Nelson Mandela
Free
Free (I'm telling you, telling you, telling you)
Free (You've got to free, yeah, you've got to free)
Free (Yeah, you've got to free, yeah, you've got to free)
Free (Nelson Mandela)
Free
Free (I'm telling you, telling you, telling you)
Free (Free, yeah, you've got to free him now)
Free (You've got to free him now, you've got to free him)
Free (I'm telling you, telling you, telling you)
Free (You've got to free, yeah, yeah)
Free (You've got to free, yeah, yeah)
Free (I'm telling you, telling you, telling you)
Free (Begging you, begging you please)
Free (I'm telling you, you've got to free, yeah
Free (you've got to free)

Source: http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/s/specials/nelson_mandela.html

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RELATED LINK
Click https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nelson_Mandela for information about Nelson Mandela (July 18, 1918).

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Thanks to Nelson Mandela for his positive role modeling & his life work. Thanks to Jerry Dammers for composing this song and thanks to the members of Special AKA for performing this song. Thanks also to the publisher of this sound file on YouTube.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Hugh Masekela -"Bring Him Home" (Bring Back Nelson Mandela)"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post is Part I of a series that showcases songs about South African activist, humanitarian, and former President of South Africa, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.

This post showcases two performances of Hugh Masekela's "Bring Him Home" (also known as "Bring Back Nelson Mandela"). English lyrics to that song are also included in this post.

Part II of this series showcases the song "Free Nelson Mandela" by The Special AKA. Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/06/special-aka-free-nelson-mandela.html for that post.

Part III of this series showcases the song "Mandela Free" by Barrington Levy. Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/06/barrington-levy-mandela-youre-free-with.html for that post.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, inspirational, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

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SHOWCASE SONG

Example #1: Bring Him Back Home



axavild, Uploaded on Apr 15, 2009

A concert recorded live in Harare, Zimbabwe, Africa in 1987...

Paul Simon - Graceland (The African Concert )

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Example #2: Bring Back Nelson Mandela (Bring Him Home)



pounjabbi, Published on May 14, 2012

In 1987, Masekela released a tribute to Nelson Mandela even though the mere mention of the name 'Mandela' meant the song would be banned in his home country.

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LYRICS - BRING HIM HOME (BRING BACK NELSON MANDELA)
(Hugh Maskela)

Bring back Nelson Mandela,
Bring him back home to Soweto
I want to see him walking down the streets of South Africa Tomorrow!

Bring back Nelson Mandela,
Bring him back home to Soweto
I want to see him walking hand in hand with Winnie Mandela.

[instrumental]
-snip-
I don't know what the Xhosa [?] phrases are in this song.

****
RELATED LINK
Click https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nelson_Mandela for information about Nelson Mandela (July 18, 1918).

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Thanks to Nelson Mandela for his positive role modeling & his life work. Thanks to the South African musician, vocalist Hugh Masekela for composing this song and thanks to Hugh Masekela & the other performers who are featured in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these examples on YouTube.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Rise And Shine (The Lord Told Noah) with lyrics

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part series of songs that have the chorus "Rise, shine, give God the glory".

This post showcases the children's song that contains the chorus "Rise, shine, give God the glory" and tells the story about Noah & the ark. This song's title is usually given as "Rise And Shine" or "Rise And Shine And Give God The Glory". However, this song is also informally known as "The Lord Told Noah", and the "Arky Arky" song.


The children's song "Rise And Shine" is clearly based on the African American Gospel song "Rise, Shine, Give God The Glory".

Part I showcases examples of Gospel songs that contain Biblical texts or references to Heaven, but aren't composed specifically for children. Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/06/three-gospel-versions-of-rise-shine.html for a post about those songs.

The content of this post is presented for entertainment and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

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SHOWCASE EXAMPLES
Example #1: Cedarmont Kids - Rise & Shine (Arky,Arky)



CROSSPOZZURE, Uploaded on Aug 11, 2008

Cedarmont Kids: Platinum Collection DVD

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Example #2: 31 Arky, Arky



Uploaded on Jul 19, 2010

#31 of 72 songs with motions available at http://www.praiseinmotion.net . From DVD, PRAISE IN MOTION, featuring 72 songs with motions for young children. The concept of this song is a fun interpretation of the Bible story of Noah and the Ark. The message is communicated through hand motions. Simple and easy to learn with the lyrics on the screen. Happy children in a preschool classroom led by music teacher, Christina Cook Lee. Also comes on CD. Order with paypal. Kids love it! Download lyrics free at www.PraiseInMotion.net ...

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LYRICS - RISE AND SHINE (children's version)
Chorus:
Rise and shine and give God the glory, glory [3x]
Children of the Lord

Verse #1:
The Lord said to Noah "There's gonna be a floody, floody"
Lord said to Noah "There's gonna be a floody, floody"
"Get those animals out of the muddy muddy"
Children of the Lord

Chorus
[So] rise, shine, and give God the glory" etc.

Verse #2:
The Lord told Noah to build him an arky, arky
Lord told Noah to build him an arky, arky
Build it out of hickory barky, barky
Children of the Lord

Verse #3:
The animals they came by twosies, twosies [3x]**
Animals they came by twosies, twosies
The Elephants and kangaroosies, roosies
Children of the Lord

Verse #4:
It rained and poured for forty daysies, daysies
Rained and poured for forty daysies, daysies
Made those animals almost crazy crazy
Children of the Lord

Verse #5
Then the sun came out and dried up the landy, landy
Sun came out and dried up the landy landy
Everything was fine and dandy dandy
Children of the Lord

Chorus
-snip-
This is the version of this song that I sing. Lyrics to another version of this song [with the same tune & tempo] is found at http://www.metrolyrics.com/rise-and-shine-lyrics-children.html.

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Thanks to the composer/s of this song & thanks to all those who are showcased performing this song. Thanks for the online transcriber of this song who I quoted & thanks to the publishers of these examples on YouTube.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitors comments are welcome.

Three Gospel Versions Of "Rise, Shine, Give God The Glory" (with lyrics)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a two part series of songs that have the chorus "Rise, shine, give God the glory". This post showcases Gospel songs that contain Biblical texts or references to Heaven, but aren't composed specifically for children.

Part II of this series showcases the children's song that contains the chorus "Rise, shine, give God the glory" and tell the story about Noah & the ark. That song is clearly adapted from the African American Gospel song which is the focus of this post. Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/06/rise-and-shine-lord-told-noah-with.html for Part II of this series.

The content of this post is presented for religious, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

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SHOWCASE EXAMPLES
Example #1: Hall Johnson Choir - Rise, Shine, Give God The Glory



Herbert Dennard, Uploaded on Jul 10, 2008

from [the 1936] film "Green Pastures" performed by Hall Johnson Choir.
-snip-
Lyrics: Rise And Shine And Give God The Glory
[as sung by the Hall Johnson Choir in "Green Pastures"]

Rise, and shine, and give God the glory, glory [3x]
Come on and join our jubilee*

Come on mourners and get you ready, ready [3x]
Come on and join our jubilee*

Come on children and don't be weary, weary [3x]
Come on and join our jubilee*
-snip-
Italics means that I'm not completely certain about this transcription.
In the context of this song "jubilee" means a happy celebration. African Americans used the word "jubilee" to be the time when slavery was officially abolished in the United States.
-snip-
Click http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Green_Pastures_(film) for information about the movie "Green Pastures".

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Example #2: "Rise Shine And Give God The Glory" - Albertina Walker



Emmanuel Jones, Uploaded on Jun 30, 2011

Albertina Walker with West Point Mass Choir & The Trinity All Nations Choir

Rise Shine And Give God The Glory, Albertina Walker, Lead
Recorded, 1981

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Example #3: Georgia Mass Choir - "Rise Shine And Give God The Glory"

Rowoches, Uploaded on Dec 29, 2009

Why don't you come on and RISE, SHINE, and GIIIIIVE GOD THE GLORY with the Georgia Mass Choir!! This is dedicated to Marcell77! Enjoy, man!
-snip-
Here's a lyrical arrangement of "Rise, Shine, And Give God The Glory" that's similar to the arrangements that are used in Example 2 & Example #3:

All:
Rise, shine, give God (the) glory.
Rise, shine, give God (the) glory.
Rise, shine, give God (the) glory.
Soldiers of the cross.
(Repeat 2 times)
Do you - think I’d - make a soldier?
Do you - think I’d - make a soldier?
Do you - think I’d - make a soldier?
Soldiers of the cross.
(Repeat 2 times)
Sopranos: Do you
All: Do you
Sopranos: Think I’d
All: Think I’d
All: Make a soldier
Soldiers of the cross.
(Repeat 2 times)

Source: http://www.joyfulvoices.org/Lyrics%20Project/PDFs/Rise%20Shine%20Give%20God%20The%20Glory.pdf
-snip-
The first verse that is found in is
"We are climbing Jacob's ladder, ladder [3x]
Soldiers of the cross"
-snip-
The verse after that which I've often heard sung is
"Every round goes higher, higher [3x]
Soldiers of the cross"
-snip-
In the renditions that I've heard, the "Do you think I'll make a soldier" is sung as the third verse. The lyrics used in the arrangements for Example #2 & Example #3 are are combinations of these lyrics. Example #3 also includes a vamp to the words "Give Him the Glory".

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Thanks to the composer/s of this song & thanks to all those who are showcased performing this Gospel song. Thanks for the online transcriber of this song who I quoted & thanks to the publishers of these examples on YouTube.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitors comments are welcome.

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Mississippi John Hurt - "I Shall Not Be Moved" (with lyrics)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases Bluesman Mississippi John Hurt singing the early Gospel song "I Shall Not Be Moved". The lyrics to this version of this song is also included in this post.

The content of this post is presented for religious and aesthetic purposes.

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INFORMATION ABOUT THIS SONG
"I Shall Not Be Moved" is a late 19th century or early 20th century African American Gospel song. This song and other African American early Gospel songs & Spirituals have a words that can easily be exchanged which facilitate their use for multiple situations. These types of compositions are known as "zipper songs". Because of that characteristic, the title of the religious song "I Shall Not Be Moved" was changed to "We Shall Not Be Moved" and different adaptations of this song were sung at pro-union rallies and at civil rights rallies & marches.

Similarly, the religious song "I'll Overcome" was retitled "We Shall Overcome" and versions of that song were sung at union rallies & at civil rights marches & rallies. The tunes for those religious song were retained. But often the tempo of the religious song became faster for its secular adaptations.

Click https://austinbhebe.wordpress.com/2012/10/10/i-shall-not-i-shall-not-be-moved/ for more comments about the song "I Shall Not Be Moved". My only disagreement with the editor of that blog is that he or she describes "I Shall Not Be Moved" as an American folk song. That said, technically all African American Spirituals and early Gospel songs which have no known composers can be considered American folk songs.

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LYRICS - I SHALL NOT BE MOVED
(As sung by Mississippi John Hurt)

Chorus:
Oh I shall not, I shall not be moved.
I shall not, I shall not be moved.
Just like a tree that's planted by the water,
I shall not be moved.

Guitar instrumental

Verse: I’m on my way to heaven,
I shall not be moved.
On my way to heaven,
I shall not be moved.
Just like a tree that's planted by the water,
I shall not be moved.

Chorus

Verse: Oh preacher, I shall not be moved.
Oh preacher, I shall not be moved.
Just like a tree planted by the water,
I shall not be moved.

Guitar instrumental

Verse: I’m sanctified and holy I shall not be moved.
sanctified and holy I shall not be moved.
Just like a tree planted by the water,
I shall not be moved.

Chorus: Oh I [guitar completes this phrase], I shall not be moved.
I shall not, I shall not be moved.
Just like a tree planted by the water,
I shall not be moved.

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SHOWCASE EXAMPLE: i shall not be moved - Mississippi John Hurt



hirkyjerkyUploaded on Oct 9, 2009

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Thanks to the composers of this song & all those who have sung it for religious, civil rights, and workers rights reasons.

Thanks to Mississippi John Hurt for his musicial legacy. Also, thanks to the publisher of this soundfile on YouTube.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitors comments are welcome.

A Video Of "Regina" by Angolan Singer Socorro & The Differences Between Traditional Angolan Dancing & Twerking

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases the Angolan singer Soccoro's song "Regina" and includes my comments about the dancing done by women in that video. This post also includes some information about Socorro.

The content of this post is provided for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

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INFORMATION ABOUT SOCCORO
From http://allafrica.com/stories/201201230199.html
"22 January 2012 Luanda — Angolan musician Kalayandi José Kabeya "Socorro" will this Sunday present, at the Independence Square, in Luanda, his third album entitled "Nzimbu (meaning money)" in the Kikongo vernacular language.

The album has 10 tracks sang in Kikongo and in the Kilapanga, Sungura and Semba music genres, as well as a mixture of Congolese rhythms.

The CD was recorded in Luanda and received its finishing touches in Germany, where 10,000 copies of the CD were edited.

The singer's music repertoire includes CDs such as "Meu Dever" (2007) and "Kuvata Dieto" (2009).

Born in the northern province of Uige, Socorro started singing gospel music in the late 80s with instruments like the traditional marimba and wood guitars."
-snip-
The same biographical information about Socorro is found in other allAfrica.com articles. Among those articles is one in which Socorro calls for more support of blind artists in Angola.

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SHOWCASE VIDEO
Example #1: socorro (regina) original



Paca Davis, Uploaded on Oct 29, 2009

Traditional Music of Angola; Ritimo quente do Quimbele
-snip-
I believe that Socorro's music is an example of Soukous music.
I'd love to know what this song means & what language/s it is sung in.

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RELATED LINK
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/05/cote-divoires-mapouka-dance-roots-of.html Cote D’Ivoire's Mapouka Dance - The Roots Of Twerking (information & videos)

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THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TRADITIONAL AFRICAN DANCING IN SOCCORO'S REGINA VIDEO & TWERKING DANCING
One of the dance movements that the women in Socorro's video "Regina" do* is similar to the contemporary -2013- dance that Americans call "twerking". However, in that 2009 video that twerking movement -when the women face backward, lean slightly forward & shake their butt - is combined with other dance movements. That face backward, lean forward. butt shaking movement doesn't last very long & thus isn't emphasized in that dance. As a result, it seems to me that that traditional butt shaking movement isn't as "raunchy"** as it would be if it were done by itself. Notice also that the women dancers' clothing isn't the short, form fitting butt emphasizing shorts or "tights" that are worn by American "twerker" dancers. Because their clothing is much less form fitting, the dance these women in Socorro's video do is much less sexually provocative than twerking is.

* For example, at 1:39/1:40 of this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FFDotPs77M

**"Raunchy" is an African American slang word which can mean the same thing as "nasty". The contemporary African American adjective "rachet" can mean the same as raunchy & nasty.

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Thanks to Soccoro for his music. Thanks also to the other singers, musicians, and dancers in these videos & the publishers of this exampls on YouTube.

Thank you for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Monday, June 24, 2013

Bobby "Blue" Bland - Further Up The Road (with lyrics & comments)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases performances of "Further Up The Road" by Bobby Blue Bland. Information about Bobby Blue Bland, lyrics & comments about this song are also included in this post.

The content of this post is provided for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

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INFORMATION ABOUT BOBBY "BLUE" BLAND
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Bland
"Robert Calvin "Bobby" Bland (January 27, 1930 – June 23, 2013), also known as Bobby "Blue" Bland, was an American singer of blues and soul. He was an original member of the Beale Streeters,[1] and was sometimes referred to as the "Lion of the Blues". Along with such artists as Sam Cooke, Ray Charles, and Junior Parker, Bland developed a sound that mixed gospel with the blues and R&B.[1] An imitator of Frank Sinatra, he was also known as the “Sinatra of the blues”, his music being influenced by Nat King Cole.[2]

Bobby Bland was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1981, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992, and received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997.[3]"

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE SONG "FURTHER UP THE ROAD"
From
""Farther Up the Road" is credited to Joe Medwick (born Joseph Medwick Veasey), a Houston-area independent songwriter/broker, and Duke Records owner Don Robey. In an interview, blues singer Johnny Copeland claimed he and Medwick wrote the song in one night; Medwick then sold it the next day to Robey, with Robey taking Copeland's songwriting credit.[2] According to Bobby Bland, Medwick wrote the song with no involvement by Robey.[2]

Farther Up the Road" is a mid-tempo twelve-bar blues that has been called a "seminal Texas shuffle".[3] It features Bland's vocals contrasted with the aggressive guitar sound of Pat Hare.[4] The backing arrangement is provided by the Bill Harvey Orchestra, who add a big band-influenced intro and outro as well as chord substitutions to the twelve-bar scheme. Part of the song's success may be due to Bland's "telling a convincing story, making brief lyrical vignettes highly believable with his conversational style".[5]

The song was Bland's first charting single after several years of recording for various record companies. It became a #1 hit during a fourteen-week stay in 1957 in the Billboard R&B chart as well as reaching #43 in the Billboard pop chart.[6] Bland enjoyed nearly uninterrupted chart success for the next twenty years."

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LYRICS - FURTHER UP THE ROAD

Further on up the road
Someone's gonna hurt you
Like you hurt me
Further on up the road
Someone's gonna hurt you
Like you hurt me

Further on up the road
Baby, you just wait and see

You got to reap
Just what you sow
That old saying is true
You got to reap
Just what you sow
That old saying is true

Like you mistreat someone
Someone's gonna mistreat you

Now you're laughing, pretty baby
Someday, you're gonna be crying
Now you're laughing, pretty baby
Someday, you're gonna be crying

Further on up the road
You found out I wasn't lying

Yeah, baby
Further on up the road, baby
You found out I wasn't lying

Further on up the road
When you're all alone and blue
Further on up the road
When you're all alone and blue

You're gonna ask me to
Take you back, baby
But I'll have somebody new

Mmm, baby
Further on up the road
Mmm, baby
Further on up the road
Mmm, you'll get yours

Source: http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/b/bobby_bland/farther_up_the_road.html


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SHOWCASE EXAMPLES
Example #1: Further up the road - Bobby bland



Deckswax,Uploaded on Nov 19, 2009

'Further up the road' by Bobby Bland.

A tale of what goes around comes around.
If ever a man had the wrong name it was Robert Bland 'cos bland he certainly wasn't.
-snip-
Here are three comments from this soundfile's viewer comment thread http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hq3cYcEfJtY:
"In Memphis in 1956 he was called Bobby ^" BLUE"^ Bland by no less than Dewey Phiilips on his radio show on Saturday night on WHBQ from the near condemned Chickasaw Hotel mezzeanaine floor { phonetically pronounced Chicksa] and on his tv show weekdays at 4:00pm His gorilla would just say Duh!

And BB King and Rufus Thomas at WDIA woud agree."
-ju2071944, 2013
**
"This wouldn't be the same without Pat Hare's amazing guitar work, a true blues guitar hero."
-ShotgunBuddha4698, 2012
**
"Oh Man!!! The original and still the best. He IS GREAT!!!

Why can't you hear this on the (free) radio? Clapton copies this and they play it to death-Bobby is the original and it doesn't get on. WTH."
-TommyMacDaddy1, 2010

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Example #2: "Further On Up The Road" - Bobby "Blue" Bland



malacomg, Uploaded on Feb 10, 2011
-snip-
Here's a comment from this video's viewer comment thread:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRZCdJ4n60Q
"Yes the tempo is a little fast but Bobby is doing 200+ shows a year when this show was taped. You are listening to one of the songs that Bobby did that's been covered by everybody. Listen closely and you have to agree Bobby does this song the best. Hell it was a song he sang first.Bobby Bland a well kept secret Bobby Bland like Elvis a good Memphis singer."
-"Thaddeus Youmans, 2012

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Thanks to Bobby Blue Bland for his musical legacy. Thanks also to the composers & the transcriber of these lyrics, and the publishers of this exampls on YouTube.

Thank you for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Sunday, June 23, 2013

Fred Hammond - This Is The Day (That The Lord Has Made)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases performances of "This Is The Day", a contemporary Gospel song by Fred Hammond.

The lyrics of this song are also included in this post.

The content of this post is provided for religious, inspirational, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

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LYRICS - THIS IS THE DAY
(Songwriter: Dolores Mary O'Riordan)

Yeah
Just clap yo hands like this
Just clap your hands like this

Yeah let's wake up the church with this old school jam
Shout to the lord in here
You know that he's good and his mercy endureth forever and the people of God said
They said what

And the people of God said yeah
And the people of God said yeah
And the people of God said yeah
And the people of God said yeah

Now we serve notice to depression, confusion
All maner of evil and every sickness
You can in to bind but you cannot stay
'cause the people of God we ani't havin' it
It's a good day, even though i cried last tuesday
And I was outter cash by friday
No matter what comes next, I'm gonna stand up
And give him the praise
'cause this is the day

This is the day, this is the day
That the lord has made, that the lord has made
I will rejoice,I will rejoice
And be glad in it, glad in it

This is the day that the lord has made
I will rejoice and be glad in it
This is the day, this is the day
That the lord has made

This is the day, this is the day
That the lord has made, that the lord has made
I will rejoice, I will rejoice
And be glad in it, glad in it

This is the day
That the lord has made
I will rejoice and be glad in it
This is the day
This is the day that the lord has made

This is the day
That the lord has made
I will rejoice and be glad in it
This is the day
This is the day that the lord has made

That the lord has made
That the lord has made
That the lord has made

As I look back over all the years that I made it through
Can't imagine (ooh ooh) where i'd be now (ooh ooh) if it wasn't for you (wasn't for you)
Why your favor rests upon me I could never explain Your favor is just what I needed
Why your favor rests upon me I could never explain Your favor is just what I needed
Why your favor rests upon me I could never explain Your favor is just what I needed
But I'm so glad that I can say
I will rejoice

And the peole of God said yeah

Source http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/f/fred_hammond/this_is_the_day_lyrics.html
-snip-
I reposted these lyrics as I found them, but usually the custom is to capitalize the first letter of every noun or pronoun that refers to God or Jesus.

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SHOWCASE EXAMPLES
Example #1: Fred Hammond - This Is the Day



BigE7Uploaded on Apr 29, 2008

From the project: Free to Worship 2006

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Example #2: Fred Hammond - This Is The Day at "The Experience"



Dedry Jones, Uploaded on Nov 28, 2009

Fred Hammond performs This Is The Day "Live at The Experience". The Experience event is created and hosted by Dedry Jones.

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Thanks to the composer of this song & thanks to Fred Hammond for his musical legacy. Thanks also to the transcriber of these lyrics, and the publishers of this exampls on YouTube.

Thank you for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Professor Longhair - Tipitina (with lyrics & comments)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases two versions of the 1954 song "Tipitina" performed by Professor Longhair. Information about Professor Longhair, lyrics to this song, and comments about the meaning of the song's title are also included in this post.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

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INFORMATION ABOUT PROFESSOR LONGHAIR
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Professor_Longhair
"Henry Roeland "Roy" Byrd (December 19, 1918 – January 30, 1980), better known as Professor Longhair, was a New Orleans blues singer and pianist. Professor Longhair is noteworthy for having been active in two distinct periods, both in the heyday of early rhythm and blues, and in the resurgence of interest in traditional jazz after the founding of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival...

He began his career in New Orleans in 1948, earning a gig at the Caldonia Club, where the owner, Mike Tessitore, bestowed Longhair with his stage name (due to Byrd's shaggy coiffure).[3] Longhair first recorded in 1949, creating four songs (including the first version of his signature song, "Mardi Gras in New Orleans," complete with whistled intro) for the Dallas, Texas based Star Talent label. His band was called the Shuffling Hungarians, for reasons lost to time. Union problems curtailed their release, but Longhair's next effort for Mercury Records the same year was a winner.[3] Throughout the 1950s, he recorded for Atlantic Records, Federal Records and other, local, labels. Professor Longhair had only one national commercial hit, "Bald Head" in 1950, credited to Roy Byrd & His Blues Jumpers.[3] He also recorded his pet numbers "Tipitina", "Big Chief" and "Go to the Mardi Gras".[1] However, he lacked the early crossover appeal of Fats Domino for white audiences.[1]"...

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE SONG "TIPITINA"
From http://tipsfoundation.blogspot.com/2010/07/my-search-for-tipitina.html "My Search For Tipitina- The Meaning of Tipitina" by Todd Souvignier, Tipitina Foundation, July 9, 2010
"Tipitina’s (the music club and associated Foundation) derives its name from the song “Tipitina” by Professor Longhair (Henry Roeland Byrd, aka Roy Byrd, “Fess” to his fans). Byrd wrote and recorded the song in 1953 for Atlantic Records. It featured a rumba-derived bass line and a right hand that careens from lilting tinkling to frenzied hammering. The song was a local hit in the 1950s, and eventually appeared on the 1972 “New Orleans Piano” LP.

At first glance the verses appear to be about a woman named Loberta who likes to party. The choruses seem nonsensical, with no obvious connection to the verses"...
-snip-
Read Part I & Part II of that post for more interesting information & speculation about the meaning of that song. For example, here are three speculative meanings from Part I & Part II of that post for the word "Tipitina":
1. [Some say that] "Tipitina" means [to give a] tip [to the female bartender named] Tina. The impication is that men may give Tina money for something else as well.

2. Tipitina was a woman with a physical disability which caused her to walk on her "tippy toes".

3. "Professor Longhair had all these apocryphal stories about where the name 'Tipitina" came from. One was that his neighborhood pot dealer was Tipitina. She had no feet, just two stumps. And she would hobble out to the car to bring the weed out, tipping over. Her name was Tina, so she was Tippy Tina."

4 [Professor Longhair indicated that] "Tipitina" was the name of a volcano that he read had erupted in Africa. [Speculation was that the actual name of the volcano was "Krakatoa" in Hawaii].

[The first & second speculative meanings are found in Part I of that post. The third & fourth speculative meanings of "Tipitina" are found in Part II of that post: http://tipsfoundation.blogspot.com/2010/07/my-search-for-tipitina-part-2-patricia.html

Click both of these links for more comments about Professor Longhair's song "Tipitina".

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LYRICS - TIPITINA
[Henry Roeland "Roy" Byrd]

Tipitina tra la la la
Whoa la la la-ah tra la la
Tipitina, oola malla walla dalla
Tra ma tra la la

Hey Loberta, oh poor Loberta
Girl you hear me calling you
Well you’re three times seven, baby
Knows what you want to do

Say Loberta, oh poor Loberta
Girl, you tell me where you been
When you come home this morning, honey
You had your belly full of gin

I'll say hurry, hurry, come on Loberta
Girl, you have company waiting for you at home
Why don't you hurry little Loberta girl, hurry
Don't leave that boy alone

Tipitina tra la la la
Whoa la la la-ah tra la la la
Tipitina, hoola malla walla dalla
Tra ma ti na na

Come on baby, we're going balling
We're gonna have ourselves a good time
We gonna hoola tralla walla malla dalla
Drink some mellow wine

©1954 word and music by Roy H. Byrd & Cosimo V. Matassa.

Source: http://tipsfoundation.blogspot.com/2010/07/my-search-for-tipitina.html
"Hoola malla walla dalla" is usually interpreted as "Give a girl a dollar".
-snip-
"Balling" may mean "partying" (going to "balls"/dances, or where dancing occurs i.e "clubbing" (going to one or more nightclubs)AND/OR "balling" means "having sex".

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SHOWCASE EXAMPLE
Example #1: Professor Longhair - Tipitina



gugu gumbo, Uploaded on Jan 31, 2007 [video]

Professor Longhair & The Meters
-snip-
Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UBSN7WOPkQ0 for an interesting discussion about this performance. WARNING: As is the case with many YouTube video viewer comment threads, some comments contain profanity.

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Example #2: Tipitina - Professor Longhair



TinkNorman, Uploaded on Feb 18, 2011 [soundfile]
-snip-
Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzFwJq1BdYs for comments about this soundfile.

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RELATED LINK
Click http://www.coldbacon.com/music/fess.html additional information about Professor Longhair. That link automatically plays the soundfile of this song that is given above.

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Thanks to Professor Longhair for his musical legacy. Thanks also to the other musicians who are featured on this video. My thanks to those who I have quoted in this post, and to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Friday, June 21, 2013

Chris Tomlin - "I Will Follow You" & Gloria Muliro - "Follow You"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases a video of American contemporary Gospel singer Chris Tomlin's original composition "I Will Follow You". This post also showcases a video of Kenyan Gospel singer Gloria Muliro's version of this song which is entitled "Follow You". Links to the complete lyrics of both of these songs are given in this post.

The content of this post is presented for religious, inspirational, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

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FEATURED VIDEOS
Chris Tomlin - I Will Follow - Lyrics



JakeSD19, Uploaded on Sep 19, 2010
-snip-
Here are the lyrics to the song that are also found in Gloria Muliro's recording:

"Where You go, I'll go
Where You stay, I'll stay
When You move, I'll move
I will follow You"
-snip-
Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ODe4sGCKxc for the complete [English language] lyrics to this song as found in the summary of this video.

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Gloria Muliro - Follow You

.

Johni Celeb, Published on Dec 19, 2012

The Latest video by Gloria muliro who brought the hits songs Sitolia feat Willy Paul and Kando. Feel free to write your comments below.
-snip-
Click http://www.ulizalinks.co.ke/follow-you-lyrics-by-gloria-muliro-in-detail/ for the complete lyrics to this song.
-snip-
There are a number of comments in this video's viewer comment thread critizing Gloria Muliro for recording a song that was originally recorded by Chris Tomlin. Here's one response to that criticism:
"Congrats Muliro.. It is a blessing for those who does not know English if you do more of the hillsongs in Swahili. There is no copy paste when i comes to Gospel... Look at the song above all, chris tomlin, lenny le blank, women of faith, michael smith, don moen... all sung. In fact all version in Enlish... Thanks to God Gloria did it and added a Swahili version.. It is a way of spreading the Gospel in all Languages"
-Linderson Johns, 2013
-snip-
I think "hillsongs" is a typo for "hit songs".
-snip-
Many of those who questioned Gloria Muliro's use of this chorus indicated that they wouldn't have any problem with that if she had credited Chris Tomlin, the original composer on her record notes. I don't know if she did so or not, but I agree that there's nothing wrong with performers singing another person's song as long as they don't take the credit for that composition.

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Thanks to Chris Tomlin and Gloria Muliro for their musical legacy.
Thanks also to the producers of these videos & their publishers on YouTube.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitors comments are welcome.

Eunice Njeri - Nimekubali (with partial Swahili & English lyrics)

Edited by Azizi Powell

Update: with full lyrics: March 3, 2018

This post showcases a video of the 2011 Kenyan Gospel song "Nimekubali" recorded by Eunice Njeri. Partial lyrics to this song are also included in this post.

Eunice Njeri is an award winning Kenyan Gospel singer who is known for her popular Gospel hits "Umeniweza" and "Bwana Yesu" among others. For more information about Eunice Njeri click http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/?articleID=2000075862&story_title=EUNICE-NJERI:-Budding-with-every-new-hit.

The content of this post is presented for religious, inspirational, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

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SHOWCASE VIDEO : Eunice Njeri - Nimekubali {OFFICIAL VIDEO}



Eunice Njeri, Published on Aug 16, 2015

-snip-
This information and lyrics were included in the summary for the no longer available YouTube video that I had embedded in this post:
-Kenyan Urban Christian Music-
Music video by Eunice Njeri performing Nimekubali.
© 2011 Eunice Njeri. Album: Nimekubali.
Produced by Robert 'Rkay' Kamanzi/Moja Entertainment.
Video directed by Kennedy Heman/Eagles Films [2012].

HOOK:
Nimekubali, nasema ndio
(I surrender, I say Yes)
Kwako ni salama, nasema ndio
(I'm safe in You, I say Yes)
Nimekubali, nasema ndio Bwana
(I surrender, I say Yes Lord)
Najitoa dhabihu iliyo hai, Bwana nitumie
(I give myself as a living sacrifice, Lord use me)

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PARTIAL LYRICS - NIMEKUBALI*
[Notice that the "hook"/chorus is given in the video summary found above.]

Lord i have accepted and agreed to be yours.
I agree that i am safe in your arms,
Lord i agree to what you say Lord...
i give myself a living sacrifice, Lord use me.
-graca2410, 2013
-snip-
This comment was posted in response to a request for lyrics of this song from Swahili speakers.
-snip-
*In the English translation of the hook that is given in this video's summary, the Kiswahili word "nimekubali" is translated as "I surrender".

An English translation of the Swahili word "Nimekubali" as "I Agree" is found at http://www.ghafla.co.ke/news/music/item/1280-the-best-worship-song-by-eunice-njeri

An online Swahili to English translation feature gave the "agree" as the meaning for "nimekubali".

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UPDATE: FULL LYRICS
NIMEKUBALI

Nimekubali, nasema ndio (I accept, I say yes)
Kwako ni salama, nasema ndio (It is safe in you, I say yes)
Nimekubali, nasema ndio Bwana (I accept, I say yes Lord)

Najitoa dhabihu iliyo hai Bwana nitumie(I give myself as a living sacrifice, Lord use me)

Bwana watafuta watakao kuabudu kwa roho na kweli
(Lord you look for those who worship in spirit and truth)
Na wakati ndio huu naamini umefika Baba (And I believe that the time is now father)
Nisaidie kutenda kulingana na mapenzi yako yahweh (Help me to do your will)
Kutembea na maagizo yako moyoni mwangu (To walk with your instructions in my heart)

(Refrain)

Mimi ni chombo mikononi mwako Yahweh (I am a vessel in your hands Yahweh)
Tena ni udongo na wewe mfinyanzi Baba (And clay, while you are the potter)
Nifinyange, nitengeneze (Mold me and make me)
Uishe nafsi yangu, chochote mimi nitatenda (Use my life, I follow


Online Source: https://www.musixmatch.com/lyrics/Eunice-Njeri/Nimekubali

****
Thanks to Eunice Njeri for her musical legacy. Thanks also to those who are quoted in this post & thanks to the producer of this video & its publisher on YouTube.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

How Biggie Smalls "Killed It" On Supercat's "Dolly Me Baby" Remix

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part series on the African American derived slang meanings & uses of the phrases "killing it" and "killed it".

Part II provides examples of "killing it"/"killed it" and its synonyms that are used in selected YouTube comments about Hip-Hop artist Notorious Big's (Biggie Smalls)' performance on Jamaican Dancehall Reggae artist Supercat's 1993 remix
of his song "Dolly Me Baby".

Part I provides definitions for the American slang phrases "killing it" and "killed it". Synonyms & antonyms are given for these phrases and and I share my speculations about why "killing it" and its synonyms came to be used that way.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/06/what-killing-it-means-how-it-got-those.html for Part I of this series.

****
The content of this post is presented for folkloric & cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Disclaimer- I'm not a linguist. Nevertheless, I'm interested in how words & phrases have different meanings among populations in the same country. I'm also interested in how the meanings of words & phrases may change over a period of time and how clusters of slang terms may have the same or similar meanings.

I welcome comments about the conclusions that I've presented in this post.

****
Part II

SUMMARY OF THE SLANG DEFINITION FOR "KILLING IT" (in the context of this post)
"Killing it"/"killed it" and its synonyms mean "to do something very very well."

****
NOTORIOUS BIG (BIGGIE SMALLS) -"I LOVE IT WHEN THEY CALL ME BIG POPPA" RAP*
i love it when you call me Big Poppa,

the show stoppa, the rhyme droppa

Supercat pass the glock, UH, I see you shivering

check the flavor Biggie Smalls is delivering

lyrical lyrics that's blowing lyrics out my larynx

chubby competitor, quick to kick a chump in the chest

yes, it's Bad Boy, hard to the core

LAAAAWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWD, me can't take it no more!
-transcribed by kimeBaksh, 2012 [from video link found below]

*This rap is not the same as the Biggie Smalls song "Big Poppa".

WARNING: Supercat's "Dolly Me Baby" and Biggie Smalls' "Big Poppa" contain language and references that may not be appropriate for children.

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THE YOUTUBE VIDEO VIEWER COMMENT THREAD
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-u5m_LfiXzM
Supercat - "Dolly Me Baby" remix

These reposted comments refer to Notorious Big [Biggie Smalls]' rap which begins at 3:18 of that video.

None of the comments posted in this post include any profanity.
However, a considerable amount of profanity is found on that YouTube comment thread.

I've refrained from adding any editorial comments about these postings, except for my comment below about "killed them" and
my comment about the difference between "ripped it" and "R.I.P.".

KILLED IT
biggie killed it."
-CJThaSavage, 2010

"Someone needs to edit Sean 'Dirty Dummy' out of this; Meth should have had a verse on this, he would have KILT it...yeah, KILT with a 'T'....
-Ghettoscott, 2010

**
"Biggie had only 30 seconds of flow but he killed it more than Puff or Super Cat"
-Markan269, 2011

**
"dis song was hot...everyone killed it except pUFF"
-TreRell71, 2011

**
"classic joint right here....puff, the other dude and biggie killed it...yes even puff, (i said it)"
-Monarch730, 2011

**
"too short for biggie smalls should of had more time
killed it tho"
-Sam Clue, 2012

**
"Biggie killz it!"
-flthomas33, 2012
**
"Biggies verse was short because he said "Lord me can't take it no more" he knew he killed it R.I.P. The Notorious B.I.G. best rapper ever p.s. diddys hat is pretty hot"
-adrian subia, 2012

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KILLING THEM
"They should have just let biggie carry the rap portion on his own and diddy and the other guy shouldn't have said one word. biggie was killng them with his lyrics!!!"
-JDAVIS4LIFE, 2011
-snip-
"killing them = "besting his collaborators/competitors" because of the quality of his rap.

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RIPPED IT
"Biggie ripped it"
-bobbgee1, 2010

**
na biggie ripped his verse lol.
-Walt Poitevien, 2010

**
"biggie ripped it as usual"
-royalnash1, 2011

**
"Big ripped it. There are no growing pains with his style or delivery. Hit the ground spittin' fire until he he was buried back in it."
-subtletiger. 2013
**
"BIG RIP IT"
-Tyrone Hill, 2011
-snip-
["RIP" = Rest In Peace [written in commemoration of someone who is deceaseed]. This is not the same as "ripped it" which means did so well he or she tore the performance up. Read more on "rip it" in Part I of this series.

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MURDERS
"biggie smalls murders this beat. the best rapper ever!"
-nene12989, 2010

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CRUSHED
"biggie crushed his verse"

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WRECKED
"Puff Daddy was wack on this song and I thought he was garbage back then. Notorious BIG wrecked it once again! RIP to the great one!"
-patattacprod1, 2011

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ASSAULTED
"big assaulted this track"
-Caveman1006, 2010

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TWO RELATED SLANG TERMS
RAW
"Biggie's tiny verse was raw!"
-BabatundeW, 2011

****
BEAST
"BIGGIE, what a BEAST!!!"
-kostadino29, 2010

****
Thanks to all of the performers on this record. Special thanks to Notorious Big [Biggie Smalls].

Thanks to all the commenters who are quoted in this post.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

African American Vernacular English: What "Killing It" Means & How It Got Those Slang Meanings

Edited by Azizi Powell

Latest Revision -September 12, 2017

This is Part I of a two part series on the African American derived slang meanings & uses of the phrases "killing it" and "killed it".

Part I provides definitions for the American slang phrases "killing it" and "killed it". Synonyms & antonyms are given for these phrases and I share my speculations about why "killing it" and its synonyms came to be used that way.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/06/how-biggie-smalls-killed-it-on.html for Part II.

Part II provides examples of "killing it"/"killed it" and its synonyms that are used in selected YouTube comments about Hip-Hop artist Notorious Big's (Biggie Smalls)' performance on Jamaican Dancehall Reggae artist Supercat's 1993 remix of his song "Dolly Me Baby".

Disclaimer- I'm not a linguist. Nevertheless, I'm interested in how words & phrases have different meanings among populations in the same country or in among different populations throughout the world during the same period of time. I'm also interested in how the meanings of words & phrases may change over a period of time and how clusters of slang terms may have the same or similar meanings.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric & cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

****
PART I
WHAT "KILLING IT" MEANS
"Killing it" = doing something very very well

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SYNONYMS & ANTONYMS FOR THE SLANG MEANING OF "KILLED IT"
Synonyms = murdered [it], ripped [it], assaulted [it], crushed [it]
(as exemplified in selected YouTube comments that are found in Part II of this series).

Also, "tore it up", "nailed it", "aced it"

Antonyms = "ruined", "destroyed", "really messed up"

However, note that the antonym "destroyed" can also be used to convey that a person "killed it" (did something very very well).

****
ONLINE SOURCES FOR THIS DEFINITION OF "KILLING IT"
[Given in no preferential order]

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100108184342AApmSCm What does "killin it" mean?

Best Answer - Chosen by Asker
"it depends on what they're talking about. but it often means the are doing a good job. he's killling it means he's doing great."
Hamlet , 2010

**
"it means like he's beast at whatever he's doing"
- ooooooh SNAP! , 2010

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http://onlineslangdictionary.com/meaning-definition-of/kill-it
“verb - to generally be high performing or do a task well.”
-snip-
The other definitions for "kill it" that are given on that page don't apply to the particular slang usage that is the focus of this post.

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http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=killin%20it
“verb: Killin it
1.to be doing something very good
john was killin it all day long in the competition"
byalexJul 16, 2004
-snip-
The other definitions for "kill it" that are given on that page don't apply to the particular slang usage that is the focus of this post.

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http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20101227122313AAuhDvd
Question: "What does "killed it" mean?

Like in youtube videos in the comments people would say "Lil' Wayne killed it" or "Drake killed this song". I wasnt sure if it was a good thing or a bad thing. Thanks so much!"
Emma, 2010

Responses:
1. "Definitley is a good thing :) Killed it, kinda like, Nailed it or did it perfectly.
Jennifer, 2010
**
2."I think it depends on the rest of the sentence before deciding if it's good or bad. Like for example, "I'm my opinion they killed the cartoons when they made the Avatar the last air bender movies." That would be a bad 'killed it'. I'm saying that they ruined the cartoon with the movie. But if I said, "Dude I totally killed that test!" That would be good, because I'm saying that I did great on the test or I think I killed it. Hope this helps!"
-SemiFrug, 2010
**
3. "It can mean 2 different meanings. One meaning is to have ruined something and the other means to have done something really well.
Example 1:
Person 1: Wow this song is sick!
Person 2: Yeah, the artist KILLED it!

Example 2:
Person 1: I did a cover for the song Beat It by Michael Jackson. Do you like it?
Person 2: Wow, …. You killed the song man...
?- 2010
-snip-
The sentences given in the first example used the positive, highly complimentary meaning of "killed it" which is the focus of this post.

*****
SYNONYMS FOR THE TERM "KILLED IT" [Updated: November 24, 2015]
From Standard American English:
PERFECTED IT - doing something flawlessly, impeccably

NAILED IT - same as above

**
From African American English
MURDERED IT:
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=murder
"to completely destroy and embarrass someone lyrically in a freestyle battle or on a track."

Whyte Out murdered his competition on 106th and Park's Freestyle Fridays
by Nick D Jun 4, 2003
-snip-
However, it should be noted that in the YouTube video comments about Biggie Smalls' "I Love It When You Call Me Big Poppa" rap [which is the focus of Part II of this series, the lyrics & Biggie's performance are the subject of the infinitive phrase "killed it" and not Biggie's competitors or collaborators [the other persons who are heard in that remix].

It's almost as if that performance art [or that athletic task]
is anthropomorphized and challenges the performer or the athlete to "bring it" [do the best that he or she can in a competition to see who has what it takes to win out in the end.] When the performer or the athlete succeeds in wringing all he or she can from that performance or that athletic competition, he or she can be said to have "killed it" [with "it" being the performance or the athletic competition, or any other challenging task].

Perhaps, the word "murder" is also used because if something is done flawlessly, there's nothing left to do. The performer has taken that art to the highest level it can go. After that it explodes or implodes on itself, and then exist no more -or exist in another form or forms. In doing so, that performer can be said to have "murdered" or "killed" that performance.

**
RIPPED IT UP, RIPPED IT
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=rip%20it

1. "going all out during a party, so hard that you literally rip it."
-jimmy dean's eggs Dec 28, 2010
-snip-
This definition isn't clear since the word being defined is used.

The other definitions given on that page don't apply to the slang usage which is the focus of this page.

**
http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=13723
1. It's meaning is that everyone involved has done everything possible to guarantee that nothing goes wrong, but no one is completely sure what will happen and the only way to find out is to activate the process. There is always a measure of uncertainty prior to "let it rip."

There is a saw blade called a rip saw that is used to cut wood with the grain. Perhaps that is where the expression "let it rip" came from.
-Bruce, 3rd February 2005, 10:58 PM

**
"I Googled and apparently it has something to do with moving at such great speed that clothing becomes ripped". [link given is no longer viable].
-Kevin R, 23rd September 2007, 11:20 AM
-snip-
The word being defined is again used in the definition. However, I think it's clear that the meaning for the word "ripped" in that sentence is "torn".

The African American/Hip Hop slang phrase "ripped it" can refer to "ripping something into shreds" and in so doing "killing it". "Ripping a performance [into shreds]" could mean that you "broke it down" to its very core. Because that performance was taken apart [and put together] to its very essense, it can be said to be killed, and -at the same time-said to be at thee hight of its "aliveness". the most 0erbrokibeeIn so doing, you "killed" what you broke

It also occurs to me that "rip it" is an updated form of "let it rip". "Let it rip"/"rip it" carry the connotation of "going all out [going "hard"]. Because the performer "went hard", (was intense but cool & in control; put himself or herself at risk, put himself or herself wholely in that performance, he or she "nailed" ("killed") that performance.
-snip-
For what it's worth, I haven't found any uses of the term "ripped it" as a synonym to "killed it" in several 2015 YouTube video discussion threads in which numerous commenters use the term "killed it", a few commenters use the term "slayed it" and "murdered it" and a few commenters describe the person as "a beast".

**
SLAYED IT
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=slayed
slayed

a word used when you dominate or do really well on something. also used when you defeat an opponent.

-Dude, I slayed that history test!

-How'd you do in that Madden game against Gavin?
--I totally slayed him, it wasn't even close.

by chicken man1212 September 07, 2007
-snip-

The other definitions given on that page don't apply to the slang usage which is the focus of this page.

****
SAYING THAT SOMEONE IS A MONSTER OR A BEAST
Origin 1990s ? = a person who is exceptionally good at what he or she does; someone who "kills" [does a very good job] at what he or she does.

****
MY SPECULATIONS AS TO WHY THESE VIOLENT SLANG PHRASES MEAN "DOING SOMETHING VERY WELL"
[Revised 09/15/2017]

In the initial publication of this post I guessed that the vernacular use of the word "killed" to mean doing something very very well"* dates from the 1990s. However, I don't have any documentation for that guess.

It occurs to me that the meaning of the "killing it" idiom is very similar to meaning of "mic drop" - i.e. that someone does something so well that there is no need for anyone else to try to do better. The challenge or the competition is over because what was done can't be beat. In that sense, the word "it" refers to "the competition".

However, in the idiom "She's killing it", He murdered it", or "They nailed it", the word "it" refers to whatever action or performance that is being done or that was done so well.

I can't speculate on how this idiom started, but my guess is that the vernacular idioms that mean "did something very very well" such as "tore the house down"; "tore it up", "nailed it", and "aced it" were used before "killed it".

Over time, African Americans changed what vernacular terms were popular with us for conveying excellence. While we changed which vernacular superlatives were "in" with us, mainstream society i.e. White folks retrained the old African American originated terms longer. Although we changed the words, we kept the same connotations: i.e. We went from something or someone being "hot", to "smokin", to "dynamite", to "the bomb", to "fire!" (which was also represented by a flame icon on certain YouTube discussion threads). All these vernacular terms and images conveyed/convey excellence. And I believe that all of these "hot"/"dynamite" terms greatly influenced the vernacular "killed it" ("murdered", "slayed") idioms.
-snip-
Here's some thoughts that I had on this subject which were written for the initial 2013 publication of this post:

1. The United States is a violent nation.
Given the nature of this nation, the complimentary use of violent terms shouldn't be unexpected.

2. Being "hard" (tough, cool but in control) and being a risk taker (adventurer, high stakes gambler) are highly valued in African American/Caribbean originated Hip-Hop Culture and in American culture in general.

Given the high value that is placed on "being hard", it's not surprising that there is a preference in those cultures for violent terminology and terminology that praises success which is achieved during high stakes, risky circumstances.

3. African American Vernacular English has a tradition of applying counter-culture (opposite) definitions for certain standard English words (such as the word "bad" meaning "very good).
"Sick" or "ill" are two other examples from Hip Hop culture of two standard English words that have been given counter culture definitions. Since at least the 1990s, something that is very good is "sick". The word "ill" seems to be used now more frequently than "sick" but carries that same counter cultural meaning.

Something or someone who is "ill" can die. However, "killed", "murdered", "assaulted", "crushed" refer to willful acts and not something that happens naturally. People have to exert themself to kill, and the use of that term & similar terms as high compliments imply that the person whose performance "killed" ("murdered"; "assaulted") (or who killed his performance) didn't do so without exerting some effort to "nail" (perfect) that performance, even though it might have looked easy to do.

4. "Killing it" may be a progression that comes from the African American English meanings given to "dynamite" and "the bomb".

The slang meaning of both of those terms -something is "dynamite" or "the bomb" - refers to something that is very good. However, in standard English, dynamite & a bomb can kill.

5. The use of the words "monster" and "beast" as referents for people who go beyond what ordinary humans do (such as people who excel in their artistic or athletic performances.

There are very clear connections between a monster or beast & killing something or someone.

****
This completes Part I of this series.

Thank you for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Beat em Bust em Cheerleading Routines (videos, words, & comments)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases various cheerleader routines for the "Beat em Bust em" chant. Brief comments about these featured routines & the words to these versions of that cheer are also included in this post.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, recreational, and entertainment purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

****
GENERAL COMMENT ABOUT "BEAT EM BUST EM"
"Beat em Bust em" is a cheerleader chant. "Chants" are shorter and more repetitious than cheers. However, cheerleader chants are usually referred to as "cheers".

****
THE INFLUENCE OF NEW STYLES OF CHEERLEADING ON THESE FEATURED CHEER ROUTINES
The inclusion of hip shaking, foot stomping, body rolls & other urban dance movements in many of these videos documents the influence that foot stomping cheers, [urban] dance cheerleading, and stomp & shake cheerleading are having on the choreography of "mainstream" ["Go team Go"] children's & youth cheerleading. Mainstream cheerleading prohibited & what appears to be a large extent still prohibits hip shaking & other such movements as indicated above.

Click http://cocojams.com/content/childrens-cheerleader-cheers for more comments about mainstream cheerleading, modified cheerleading, foot stomping cheerleading, and stomp & shake cheerleading.

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FEATURED EXAMPLES
{These examples are posted in chronological order by their publishing dates with the oldest video published first.]

Example #1: Cheerleading Dad



Deborah B., Uploaded on Sep 10, 2008

PSA for Fatherhood.gov
-snip-
"PSA" = public service announcement
This video of this ad is given with captions. A man & his daughter practice cheerleader cheers outside of their apartment.
Oh those boys are much too much
those boys are much too much!
We got the spirit, we’re hot
We can’t be stopped.
We got the spirit, we’re hot
We can’t be stopped
We’re gonna beat’em and bust ‘em
Beat ‘em and bust ‘em
That’s our custom.
-snip-
This is actually a combination of three cheers. "Those boys are much too much" is the first cheer. The second cheer begins with the line "we've got the spirit" & "Beat em bust em" is the third cheer.

"Those boys are much too much" refers to the athletic team that the cheerleading squad is cheering for as that squad wouldn't be praising boys in general or the members of the other team. (Saying that people are "much too much" or something is "much too much" is a colloquial form of high praise).

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Example #2: we got the spirit were hot we cant be stopped (fatherhood)


thermdiggy• Uploaded on Mar 31, 2009
Diggy and his daughter havin fun
Them boys them boys are much too much
them boys are much too much!
We got the spirit, we’re hot
We can’t be stopped.
We got the spirit, we’re hot
We can’t be stopped
We gotta beat’em and bust ‘em
We gotta beat ‘em beat em bust ‘em
bust em
And beat ‘em, beat ‘em,
bust ‘em bust’em
-snip-
This video was almost certainly inspired from the fatherhood video that is given as Example #1 above. Notice the change from "those boys" to "them boys".

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Example #3: Delta Valley Wolfpack : Beat em bust em Cheerleading Chant



DeltaValleyWolfpack, Uploaded on Jul 21, 2009
-snip-
Beat em
Say*
Beat ‘em and bust ‘em
That’s our custom
And roll ‘em. Roll’em.

[repeat entire chant]
*I'm not if this transcription is correct.

One commenter wrote that this cheer was "kinda ghetto". It's offensive to refer to cheer routines that include Black originated dance movements as "ghetto".

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Example #4: Beat em Bust em



Allie Thrailkill, Uploaded on Mar 3, 2010
one of our cheers
-snip-
Beat’em. Bust ‘em
Beat ‘em bust ‘em
Come on [team name]
Let’s go beat ‘em.

[repeat entire chant]
-snip-
This routine shows the influence of the African American orginated performance art of foot stomping on the choreography of children/youth cheerleading cheers. The routine used in the cheerleader movie Bring It On All Or Nothing for the cheer "Shabooya Roll Call" is an example of the foot stomping style of cheerleading, although in my opinion, that "Shabooya Roll Call" foot stomping in that movie was very exaggerated, and therefore not true to how that steppin-like movement art is usually done.

Click http://cocojams.com/content/foot-stomping-cheers-0 for information about foot stomping cheers.

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Example #5: Beat 'Em Bust 'Em

.

CheerCMSVipers,Uploaded on Mar 7, 2010

New Project 8
-snip-
Beat ‘em bust ‘em
Beat’em. Bust ‘em
Beat ‘em bust ‘em
Go, Vipers
-snip-
This routine shows the influences of the African American performance arts of foot stomping & stomp & shake cheerleading on children/youth cheerleading routines.

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Example 6: Beat Em Bust Em Demo



Rrpwcheer, Uploaded on Sep 25, 2011
-snip-
Beat ‘em Bust ‘em
Cheerleaders ready?
Okay.

Beat ‘em [clap clap]
Bust ‘em [clap clap]
Beat ‘em and bust ‘em
That’s our custom
Go Colts go!
[repeat entire chant]
-snip-
This routine is an example of the mainstream style of cheerleading.
Notice that the cheerleaders don't swing their hips or do any foot stomping & body patting movements in styles that are associated with African American orginated foot stomping/fraternity & sorority steppin.

****
Example #7: Cheers (Part II)



Jenica Smithee, Published on Apr 14, 2012
-snip-
B-E-A-T Beat 'em, beat 'em
B-U-S-T Bust 'em, bust 'em
Beat 'em, bust 'em that's our custom go GCA!
-snip-
The words to the other cheers that were performed can be found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qcQzQAs_ok
-snip-
This Beet em Bust em routine is an example of the mainstream style of cheerleading. There's only a very minimal amount of hip swinging in the first chant routine & these routines show no traces of foot stomping cheerleading movements.

****
Example #8: beat em bust em, we've got the G, paws, and hey hey



nicole russell, Published on Jun 27, 2012
-snip-
(.02-.27)

Beat em Bust em
Set
Ready?

B-e-a-t Beat em
B-u-s-t Bust em
Beat ‘em and bust ‘em
That’s our custom
That’s how we are gonna crush em
Come on
[repeat entire chant]
-snip-
The cheer routines that are shown in this video are examples of mainstream cheerleading with a [minimal] addition of the African American originated stomp & shake cheerleading movements (as shown in the cheerleader's slight hip shaking).

The words to the other cheers are found in the Cocojams cheerleading cheers page whose link is found below. Click http://cocojams.com/content/stomp-and-shake-cheerleader-cheers for information about & examples of stomp & shake cheerleading cheers.

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RELATED LINK
Click http://cocojams.com/content/childrens-cheerleader-cheers for more examples of children's cheerleader cheers & chants.

****
Thanks to all those who are featured in these videos.

Thank you for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.