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Wednesday, May 18, 2022

How The Dancehall Dance "The Willie Bounce" Got Its Name (with a bonus video of Elephant Man Teaching His Top 10 Dances)



VP Records, Sept. 25, 2009

Music video by Elephant Man performing Willie Bounce.

**** Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part III of a five part pancocojams series about Jamaica's Dancehall Reggae dances. 

This post showcases a YouTube video of the Dancehall dance "Willie Bounce" and presents information and comments about how the Dancehall dance "Willie Bounce" got its name.

This post also presents information about the Dancehall recording artist Elephant Man who first recorded "Willie Bounce" in 2006.  

This pancocojams post also showcases a bonus video of Elephant Man teaching his top ten dances.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/jamaicas-dancehall-reggae-dances.html for Part I of this pancocojams series. This post presents some online excerpts about the history of Jamaica's Dancehall dances. A partial list of and descriptions of some of Dancehall dances are also included in this pancocojams post.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/information-about-jamaican-dancehall.html for Part II of this pancocojams series. That post presents information about legendary Jamaican dancer/choreographer "Mr. Bogle" ("Mr. Wacky") and showcases three YouTube videos that feature Mr Bogle.

Part IV showcases a YouTube video demonstration of some of the dances that were created by Dancehall  dancer/ creator "Mr. Bogle". Selected comments from that video's discussion thread is also included in that pancocojams post.

Part V showcases a YouTube video demonstration of various Dancehall dances. Selected comments from that video's discussion thread is also included in that pancocojams post. 

The content of this post is presented for history and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Mr. Bogle for his cultural legacy. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post nd thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.
-snip-
Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/excerpts-about-history-of-jamaicas.html for the closely related pancocojams post entitled "Excerpts About The History Of Jamaica's Dancehall Reggae Music".

Also,click the Dancehall Reggae tag below for other pancocojams post about that music and dances.

**** HOW "THE WILLIE BOUNCE DANCE" GOT ITS NAME Excerpt #1 From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willie_Haggart
"William Augustus Moore (14 March 1961 - 18 April 2001), also known as The Chief Of Staff, was believed to have been an underworld kingpin, and the reputed leader of the Black Roses Crew.[3] Because of his nature, as a young man he was given the nickname "Willie Haggart", a patois corruption of "hog-heart".[4]

[…]

Black Roses Crew

Around the early 1990s, Haggart was invited by Bogle to join his entertainment/party crew Roses which made him popular within the dancehall community worldwide. The 'Willie Bounce' dance move was created and named in his honour."...

****
Excerpt #2
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0sUSsEE4gh8 "Who was WILLIE HAGGART - William Moore? πŸ‡―πŸ‡²" published by Teach Dem,Dec 10, 2019  

1. Mark Clarke, 2019
"Willie Hogheart not Haggart, yes he had a vicious temper kicked elephant man in his backside one time. Dons usually stayed out of the limelight, but this don was overt. "...

**
Reply
Barrington Hall, 2019
"Teach his father was a butcher and he steal from him and they say he stole a hog's heart by mistake... So his name came about... Not by badness... Bless up"

****

INFORMATION ABOUT ELEPHANT MAN From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elephant_Man_(musician) "Oneal Bryan,[1] better known by his stage name Elephant Man is a Jamaican dancehall musician and singer.[Born 11 September 1975; Seaview Gardens, Kingston, Jamaica

Career

He started out his musical career in 1995 as a member of the Scare Dem Crew, later continuing as a solo artist. He was later characterised for several trademarks, such as his dyed yellow-orange hair, his unique low-key voice, and his stage performance, which included jumping and running, or even climbing on stage props and monitors.[citation needed] His acoustic trademark is a low, raspy grumble singing voice and light lisp.

Bryan had his first international recognition when he and Puma settled a contract for using his single "All Out" for its Olympics commercial campaign in 2004.

His song "Willie Bounce" appeared on several mixtapes in early 2006. It used the first few bars from "I Will Survive" by Gloria Gaynor. "Willie Bounce" has been described as one of Elephant Man's most recognizable songs, with the corresponding dance still enjoying popularity as of 2015.[2]"...

****
BONUS VIDEO: Elephant Man Teaches His Top 10 Dance Moves
Boomshots TV, August 2, 2016
With Notting Hill Carnival coming up next weekend, it's time to brush up on your dance steps. If you don't know the "Willie Bounce" from the "Gangsta Rock," fret not thyself. Reshma B linked up with Di Energy God himself in Kingston, Jamaica, and Elephant Man taught The Reggae Girl About Town how to do his Top 10 Dance Moves. Subscribe to Boomshots TV for more crucial reggae and dancehall videos.
-snip- Here's a list of those dances with time stamps (posted as a comment in this video's discussion thread by Nimbleful, 2021

"Dance Move time stamps

1:11 Pon di River, Pon di Bank

1:51 Signal di Plane

2:29 Nuh Linga

3:26 Gully Creeper

4:25 Crazy Hype

5:10 Sweep

5:44 Gangsta Rock

6:06 Willie Bounce

6:30 Bogle Move

7:33 Jiggy" -snip- Here are two comments from that video's discussion thread:

1. Joel Ranglin, 2017 "Some of them, a lot of them were made by Mista Wacky, who died a few years back now, he was like a choreographer in Jamaica. When he died the dancehall “dance” music started to die also" -snip- "Mr. Wacky" is another name for dancehall icon "Mr Bogle" (Gerald Levy). Mr Wacy was killed January 2005.

** 2. africarib, 2021 "No he didnt create these dances.  Most Jamaican dances are created by other people or dancing crews then dancehall artists make them popular by singing about the moves to show everybody." -snip- "He" in this comment refers to Elephant Man.

**** This concludes Part III of this pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams. Visitor comments are welcome.

Information about Jamaican Dancehall Dancer/Dance Creator "Mr Bogle" (with three videos featuring Mr Bogle)




Brotherwhitelion, August 8, 2013

Gerald 'Bogle' Levy, aka 'Mr. Wacky', at Rose's Corner, Kingston Jamaica 2005. Bogle was the first to make a name for himself as a Dancehall Dancer/Choreographer, who created as many dance moves, as 'moving' as 'many' to dance. Bogle features on the video clip Weh Di Time, with Delly Ranks and Voicemail. Tragically Bogle was killed... "It Is Nice To Be Important... But It Is More Important To Be Nice" (Bogle 22 August 1964 -- 20 January 2005)

Keeping It Jiggy!' Ites! brotherwhitelion

**** 
Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a five part pancocojams series about Jamaica's Dancehall Reggae dances. 

This post presents information about legendary 
Jamaican dancer/choreographer "Mr. Bogle" ("Mr. Wacky") and showcases three YouTube videos that feature Mr Bogle. A few selected comments from the discussion threads of various Dancehall videos are also included in this post.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/jamaicas-dancehall-reggae-dances.html for Part I of this pancocojams series. This post presents some online excerpts about the history of Jamaica's Dancehall dances. A partial list of and descriptions of some of Dancehall dances are also included in this pancocojams post.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/how-dancehall-dance-willie-bounce-got.html for Part III of this pancocojams series. That post showcase a YouTube video of the Dancehall dance "Willie Bounce" and provides information & comments about that dance got its name. Information about Elephant Man who first recorded the "Willie Bounce" in 2006 is also included in that pancocojams post.

Part IV showcases a YouTube video demonstration of some of the dances that were created by Dancehall  dancer/ creator "Mr. Bogle". Selected comments from that video's discussion thread is also included in that pancocojams post.

Part V showcases a YouTube video demonstration of various Dancehall dances. 
Selected comments from that video's discussion thread is also included in that pancocojams post. 

The content of this post is presented for history and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Mr. Bogle for his cultural legacy. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post nd thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.
-snip-
Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/excerpts-about-history-of-jamaicas.html for the closely related pancocojams post entitled "Excerpts About The History Of Jamaica's Dancehall Reggae Music".

Also,click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2020/10/the-real-meaning-of-now-classic-2005.html for the 2020 pancocojams post entitled What The Jamaican Word "Weddy" ("Weh Di") REALLY Means. That post includes the lyrics to Voice mail's 2005 song "Weh Di Time".

And click the Dancehall Reggae tag below for other pancocojams post about that music and dances.

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO #2:  
Bogle Mr. Wacky The Jamaican Dancehall Legend



Lyric DVD, Sept 2, 2013

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO #3: 
TRIBUTE TO BOGLE AKA MR WACKY THE DANCER

video dave ja, June 20, 2021

****
INFORMATION ABOUT "MR BOGLE" (also known as "MR WACKY")
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bogle_(dancer) 
"Bogle (22 August 1964 – 20 January 2005), born Gerald Levy, and also known as Bogle Dancer, Mr Bogle, Father Bogle, and Mr Wacky, was a Jamaican dancehall star, dancer and choreographer. Beenie Man called Bogle "the greatest dancer of all time"[1] and he is recognised as "part of the foundation and as an icon inside of dancehall culture."[2] Bogle created more dancehall moves than any other figure, he is best known for creating the Bogle dance which is named after him.[3] His stage name, Bogle, is a reference to Paul Bogle a National Hero of Jamaica.

Early life

Gerald Levy was born on 22 August 1964 in Trenchtown, West Kingston in the capital of Jamaica. He was educated at Charlie Smith All Age and spent a brief period at St George's College. As a child in the 1970s he appeared on Louise Bennett's television show Ring Ding and in the 1980s he danced on the Saturday evening television programme Where It's At, both on the Jamaican Broadcasting Corporation.[3]

Career

Bogle was called the "Dancehall Master" and was best known for his dancing. He had the ability to seemingly create dances without effort and his dances would become extremely popular. Creator of the Willie Bounce (named after Bogle's friend and Black Roses Crew member Willie Haggart), Wacky Dip, Urkle Dance, Sesame Street, Bogle Dance, Pelper, LOY,[4] Jerry Springer, Zip It Up, Hotti Hotti Bogle, World Dance,[4] Pop Yuh Collar, Row di Boat, Out and Bad, Sweeper, Stuckie[citation needed], and many other popular dances.[2] He was also in Belly.[citation needed]

In the 1990s, Levy created the Bogle dance, the scene's first crossover dance move. He was also a major influence on breakout artists such as Elephant Man and Beenie Man, who gave shout-outs to Levy in songs like "Row Like a Boat": "Seh Mr. Bogle have di brand new style/Come get di style, come get di style."...
-snip-
Here's information about Paul Bogle 
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Bogle
"Paul Bogle (1820 – 24 October 1865)[2] was a Jamaican Baptist deacon and activist. He is a National Hero of Jamaica. He was a leader of the 1865 Morant Bay protesters, who marched for justice and fair treatment for all the people in Jamaica. After leading the Morant Bay rebellion, Bogle was captured by government troops, tried and convicted by British authorities under martial law, and hanged on 24 October 1865 in the Morant Bay court house.[3]"...

****
ARTICLE EXCERPT ABOUT MR BOGLE
From https://www.economist.com/1843/2020/01/16/dance-or-die-fighting-for-the-legacy-of-bogle-the-godfather-of-dancehall "Dance or die: fighting for the legacy of Bogle, the “Godfather of dancehall”

Gerald “Bogle” Levy is to dancehall what Bob Marley is to reggae. But 15 years after the legendary dancer was shot dead, Jamaica’s dancehall scene still craves recognition for its fallen hero. Hannah Moore heads to Kingston, by By hannah moore, Jan 16th 2020 (Updated Jan 20th 2020)

"It’s a warm Sunday afternoon in downtown Kingston and in the yard beside Lonsdale “Boysie” Guy’s house, a group of local women have set up a makeshift sound system for the neighbourhood. They lean on the subwoofer, chatting and teasing each other in quick-fire patois, as one aunty pours generous measures of white rum and cranberry into plastic cups. Aidonia’s braggadocious dancehall hit “Big Baller” thumps through the speaker, making the ground shake beneath our feet.

Wearing a white vest, slim-cut navy track pants and socks with pool sliders, Boysie (pictured above) pulls up a plastic chair and watches them while he waits to start his dance class. He is the last surviving member of the Black Roses crew, a legendary dance collective founded by Gerald “Bogle” Levy, the so-called “Godfather” of dancehall, who was shot dead at a gas station in January 2005. Bogle’s brutal murder shocked Jamaicans and dancehall fans across the world. Despite the national outcry, it remains unsolved."....

****
A FEW COMMENTS ABOUT "MR BOGLE" ("MR WACKY") FROM SEVERAL YOUTUBE VIDEO DISCUSSION THREADS

These comments are given in no particular order and are numbered for referencing purposes only.

Discussion thread #1
From 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXRnAG0Xn2U&t=131s Bogle Special & Bogle/Delly Ranks/Voicemail ~ Weh Di Time (Official Dancehall Video), published by Brotherwhitelion, August 8, 2013

1. DaPhlyymamee, 2017, 
"I first fell in love wit di style of Bogle as a teenager. I was like: Who is that man in the green pants????πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘ŒπŸ’ƒ I was introduced to Ice's style in a Voicemail video.  I miss these people that I never had to blessing to meet. I was so sad when they left this Earth. 😒Mr. Wacky your dancing will always live on through me! Selah Rest In Power...Respect Ulaghize!❤πŸ’›πŸ’š"

**
2. Colleth Reid, 2022
"The Man, the History  and the Dance!!!! Bogle legendary dancer.... best πŸ•Ί of all times..... dancer hall still cannot find one that is even close to the boss."

**
3. GhostXLeo, 2022
"πŸ™πŸΎπŸ™πŸΎπŸ™πŸΎ R.I.P The Greatest Dancer in The World 🌎 πŸ™πŸΎπŸ™πŸΎ Dancehall Legend πŸ‡―πŸ‡² Bogle πŸ‘πŸΎπŸ™ŒπŸΎ"

****
Discussion thread #2
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wh-8ReMr3Hw MR WACKY / BOGLE " DANCE - HALL LEGEND '' !!!, Big Stone Television, August 18 2011

1. Ryan Mcdonald, 2022
"S.i.p Mr wacky. Always in our nation people's❤️ heart."

****
Excerpt #3
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQRIYSRIouc A Jamaican Dance for every Genre by Orville Halls’ Dance Xpressionz, Reggae Month 2020

1. jabrown1978, 2021, 
"No mention of doing The Bogle??? EVERYONE, they mama, daddy, grandchildren, cousins, aunties, uncles, even the unborn was doing that dance in the 90's! πŸ˜‚πŸ˜πŸ˜‹ To me, it really became a pop culture reference, and it has to be one of the easiest ones to do."


****
This concludes Part II of this pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.




Tuesday, May 17, 2022

Jamaica's Dancehall Reggae Dances (History Of And Influences Upon Dancehall Dances & Descriptions Of Some Old School Examples Of Those Dances)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a five part pancocojams series about Jamaica's Dancehall Reggae dances. 

This post presents some online excerpts about the history of Jamaica's Dancehall dances. A partial list and descriptions of some Dancehall dances are also included in this pancocojams post.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/information-about-jamaican-dancehall.html for Part II of this pancocojams series. That post presents information about legendary 
Jamaican dancer/choreographer "Mr. Bogle" ("Mr. Wacky") and showcases three YouTube videos that feature Mr Bogle.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/how-dancehall-dance-willie-bounce-got.html for Part III of this pancocojams series. That post showcase a YouTube video of the Dancehall dance "Willie Bounce" and provides information & comments about that dance got its name. Information about Elephant Man who first recorded the "Willie Bounce" in 2006 is also included in that pancocojams post.

Part IV showcases a YouTube video demonstration of some of the dances that were created by Dancehall  dancer/ creator "Mr. Bogle". Selected comments from that video's discussion thread is also included in that pancocojams post.

Part V showcases a YouTube video demonstration of various Dancehall dances. 
Selected comments from that video's discussion thread is also included in that pancocojams post. 

The content of this post is presented for history and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those musical artists, choreographers and dancers who have contributed to Jamaica's Dancehall music and dance. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post.
-snip-
Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/excerpts-about-history-of-jamaicas.html for the closely related pancocojams post entitled "Excerpts About The History Of Jamaica's Dancehall Reggae Music".

Also, click the Dancehall Reggae tag below for other pancocojams post about that music and dances.

****
ONLINE EXCERPTS ABOUT  JAMAICA'S DANCEHALL REGGAE DANCES
These excerpts are numbered for referencing purposes only.

Excerpt #1
From https://tabankadance.com/dancehall-lecture-noted/ [no publishing date cited]
"Dancehall is a popular dance genre springing out of English speaking Caribbean, and spearheaded from Jamaica. It is the mix and coming together of African retention dances of the region and Jamaica in particular, with popular culture, and youthful “innovation”.  Dancehall has in the later years been used to package and sell Jamaican and Caribbean culture. It has for that purpose been restructured in order to sell more on the international market. Dancehall is one of the larges industries in Jamaica.

Dancehall has informed several other Dancestyles, predates Hip Hop culture, and has enjoyed several rounds of mainstreaming and crossover since the 1960s. The movements that inform Dancehall come predominantly from Jamaican traditional dance retentions. Reggae however is in itself also a fusion of these styles although not allowing for the same rhythmical diversity as Dancehall has. Dancehall springing out of Reggae and still being considered as a reggae sub-genre always adhers to the Reggae “feel” or “pulse”. This predominantly drawing from Kumina, nyabinghi (Rastafari), and Maroon roots. The 16 rhythmic genres of dance that Dancehall predominantly draws upon are the following: 

[Pancocojams Editor's Note: This article lists and then provides an overview of 16 dance forms, all of which are African or -less often-African/European dances.]

The majority of these are considered to be religious dances, and have evolved considerably over the years. One of the few to not be associated with faith, the Junkanoo dances, still exist today in their original style. As well as the characters of the Junkanoo is very much what has informed the different styles of Dancehall.

[Pancocojams Editor's Note: This article continues with the following descriptions of Jonkannu and of Tambu.]

JONKONNU
A strong dance and musical tradition in Jamaica, Jonkonnu has been preserved the most accurately through the years, recognized as the oldest dance style on the island. A fusion of African mime and European folk theater, Jonkonnu always tells a story, and is often cast like a play with each dancer receiving a specific character to portray. Much of the humor and play, very much used by for example “Les Twins”, involving theatrics, dancers forming together to make bikes, horses and saddle etc etc comes from this form.

Traditionally-assigned characters, each with their own choreography, include:

Pitchy Patchy – a lively character with small and rapid steps. He also moves in circular patterns that take up much of the dance space, and includes basic acrobatics like cartwheels into his movements.

Devil – though the title sounds ominous, Devil is actually charming and entertaining, with an alternation of small and bouncy steps with long and fluid ones. Combined with turns and jabs with a pitchfork, this character is noted in many Jonkonnu

Cow Head – low to the ground and sticking to bucking movements, this dancer moves much like an actual cow head.

Belly Woman – performs belly movements in sync with the rhythmic beats of the music

Set Girls – costumed groups of female dancers who fill out what can be considered the ensemble or chorus line of Jonkonnu

TAMBU
The tambu dance takes its name from the drum referred to as “tambu” and is performed mainly for entertainment with couples facing and moving towards each other using the Shay-shay, Saleone and Mabumba sequence. The shay-shay features rotating action of the hips, shuffling along with one foot on the ball."....

****
Excerpt #2
From https://www.my-island-jamaica.com/jamaican_dance_steps.html Jamaican Dance Steps, contributed by Tracie Blake. Originally posted: 8/7/08, updated 7/5/2014
…."The early stages of Jamaican Dance Moves started with the Dinki Mini and Bruckins Parties which are now mainly practiced at Independence/Emancipation time.

These are processional dances where all participants dress up in costumes and the dance moves are performed in a uniformed way depicting naturally exhumed choreography. Over the years, these foundations have remained but evolved and progressed into new dances which are a graze worldwide.

After these dances came the ska (fast movements of the hips and flailing of the arms between the legs) and rock steady (slow movements of the hips and arms being held close to the body) which has culminated into dance hall moves consisting of a vast combination of movements.

 Here are a few of today's contemporary Jamaican dance hall moves:

The Bogle
Well, although not to 'new' anymore, it is still a favourite. The dancer points the hands toward the air in a flailing steady motion while moving the body back and forth in a snake-like movement.

Heel-And-Toe
This dance involves jumping slightly off the ground and landing with your right foot directly in front of your left foot with one foot landing on the heel and the other on the toe and pivoting in a circle with the arms and upper torso moving to the rhythm of the music.

Pon the River, Pon the Bank
This dance includes jumping to the music and tilting from the heel to the toe from one invisible line to the other while focusing on the rhythm of the music.

 jamaican dance steps

Signal the Plane
In this dance style, the dancer stands in one position and waves his/her arms toward the sky as if signaling to a plane to land. This is repeated to the rhythm of the music and the body is thrust in a back and forth rocking motion.

Hot Wuk
This dance is done by women and involves the “whining” or gyrating of the hips and buttocks while flashing the fingers in an outward motion and bearing an expression of pain/discomfort on the face.

Tek Weh Yuself
In this dance, the dancer makes small tapping movements with the feet while bouncing to the music and moving from side to side pointing in the direction they are going (left to right).

Beyonce Wine
This is another dance ideally done by women where she stands in one position and gyrates the buttocks while looking “sassy”.

Dutty Wine
This dance is mainly done by women and involves standing or kneeling firmly on the floor while swinging the head vigorously in a circular motion while rotating the buttocks.

Of course, there is the latest dance, called the Gully Creeper, but more to come on that.

These are just a few of the popular Jamaican Dance Steps from old to new and the beat plays on"….
-snip-
Here's a list of "the latest" Dancehall dances noted in that article without descriptions, presumable as part of its 2014 update.

"-Flairy

-Lebeh Lebeh

-Fling You Shoulder

-Genna Bounce

-Tip

-Skip

-One Drop

-Kotch

-Bruk It Dung

-NoLinga"

****
Excerpt #3
From https://jamaicans.com/jamaicanstreetdancehistory/ Jamaican Street Dance History by Martinoaka Breakboy NRG, 2012
"Jamaica’s street dance culture dates back to the late 50’s early 60’s. In anticipation of Jamaica gaining independence from Britain, the late 50’s brought about a new found spirit of nationalism. Inspired by this, local jazz musician and pioneering producer “Coxsone” Dodd was driven to create a uniquely Jamaican dance sound. This music was called Ska and fused American jazz and R&B with Jamaican mento, and featured a strong bass and drum rhythm section, guitars, keyboards and brass. Rocksteady, and later, reggae eventually evolved from ska in the late 1960’s.

In response to ska, a dance called “the ska” was created and then later the more popular “skanking”, these were Jamaica’s first urban dance moves. “Ronnie and Jeanette” a popular local dance team visited the 1964 World’s Fair in New York along with renowned Jamaican musicians in order to demonstrate the phenomenal music and dance innovations.

By the late 60’s early 70’s, “Teenage Dance Party” a popular weekly radio program which showcased the most popular North American music along with the emergence of reggae, made the regular creation of new dance moves essential. These urban dance moves were to become a vital component in defining Jamaican dancehall culture. The innovative dancers in every community prided themselves as being pacesetters by how successful they were in creating and spreading their moves through parties or “dances.” These dancers would eventually form dance troupes, troupes such as Blacker Spades, GQ, and LTD added the element of theatrics and acrobatic moves to popular moves and took their act to the stage. By performing at talent shows, school barbeques, high school parties and entering dance competitions, these troupes would expose the greater public to the amazing dance culture emerging from the ghettos in Kingston. In addition, to the many stage shows showcasing the skills of the talented dancers, television also played a major part.

In 1971, a young cameraman for the local TV station JBC (Jamaica Broadcasting Corporation, now TVJ) named Alphonso Walker created a program aimed at young people. This TV show had two segments one which was geared to promoting and showcasing local talent in a party like atmosphere (not unlike Soul Train) and the other a forum where issues affecting young people in the society were discussed. The Show was called Where It’s At, and would take Jamaican urban culture into almost every Jamaican home. Eventually the show was overhauled, according to Alphonso ‘the show did not have the right type of energy, it was too bland”. He decided then to take out the forum, and replace the “uptown” dancers with dancers from the inner city, which included members of the Funky Phonics who he thought was more energetic and creative. He was right, the result was a more potent show, and appealed to a greater audience. The show lasted for 15 years. People would tune in weekly to find out what the new dance was, as a result the Where It’s At dancers became very popular, and you could see their influence on the dance floors of Jamaica. The mid to late 70’s brought a wave of R&B and funk music to dance floors, dancers would now need a new repertoire of dance moves to respond to this music. Their affiliation with JBC allowed the Where It’s At dancers access to satellite transmissions of U.S TV programs, one program of particular interest to them was Soul Train. Soul Train gave the dancers an inside track to what was going on in urban dance in America and allowed them to be up to date on the new music and dances that went with them.”…
-snip-
This article is reformatted to enhance its readability.

****
Excerpt #4
From 
https://jamaicansmusic.com/learn/origins/dancehall Origin Of Dancehall [no author of publishing date cited]
"Some would consider Dancehall to the most popular music in Jamaica. It began in the late 1970s and has now impacted all different types of musical genres worldwide. Initially Dancehall was a more sparse version of Reggae than the roots style, which had dominated much of the 1970s. In the mid-1980s, digital instrumentation became more prevalent, changing the sound considerably, with digital Dancehall becoming increasingly characterized by faster rhythms.

The popularity of Dancehall has spawned dance moves that help to make parties and stage performances more energetic. Many dance moves seen in Hip Hop videos are actually variations of Dancehall dances. Examples of such dances are: "Like Glue", "Bogle", "Wine & Dip", "Tek Weh Yuhself", "Whine Up", "Boosie Bounce", "Drive By", "Shovel It", "To Di World", "Dutty Wine", "Sweep", "Nuh Behavior", "Nuh Linga", "Skip to My Lou", "Gully Creepa", "Bad Man Forward Bad Man Pull Up", "Keeping it Jiggy", "Pon Di River", "Willie Bounce", "Wacky Dip", "Screetchie" and "Daggering.”

With so much more to come, Dancehall has changed the face of music. It is one of the most versatile genres out there and so many artistes all over the world collaborate on tracks that feature Dancehall riddims or try to cut it close to the musicality if its uniqueness. With world renowned artistes such as Beenie Man, Mavado, Vybz Kartel, Busy Signal, Aidonia, and Konshens; Dancehall music has produced some of the most charismatic and energetic artistes with massive sounds. "...

****
This concludes Part I of this pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Sunday, May 15, 2022

Dancehall Reggae Memories (Part IV: from Africa)



DJ Alkazed, Aug 17, 2019

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part IV of a five part pancocojams series on Jamaica's Dancehall Reggae music.

This post presents comments from various YouTube discussion threads about memories of Dancehall Reggae that were shared by people from various African nations.  

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/dancehall-reggae-memories-part-i.html for Part I of this pancocojams series. That post presents comments from various YouTube discussion threads about memories of Dancehall Reggae that were shared by people from the Caribbean. 

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/dancehall-reggae-memories-part-ii-from.html for Part II of this pancocojams series. That post presents comments from various YouTube discussion threads about memories of Dancehall Reggae that were shared by people in United States or in Canada. 

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/dancehall-reggae-memories-part-iii-from.html for Part III of this pancocojams series. That post presents comments from various YouTube discussion threads about memories of Dancehall Reggae that were shared by people in South America or in Central America.  

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/dancehall-reggae-memories-part-v-from.html for Part V of this pancocojams series. That post presents comments from various YouTube discussion threads about memories of Dancehall Reggae that were shared by people in the United Kingdom or shared by people in various other nations around the world.

All of these comments include geographic information (neighborhood, city, state, and/ or nation that the commenter comes from). Each of these posts features a sound file of video of  a Dancehall mix. Each of these posts also include links to the YouTube sound files/videos that the comments came from.

The content of this post is presented for historical, cultural, and entertainment purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all past and present Dancehall artists. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to reggae Vibes Media for the Dancehall mix that is embedded in this post. Thanks also to all of the DJs whose mixes are featured as hyperlinks in this post.
-snip-
Also, click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/excerpts-about-history-of-jamaicas.html . That post presents some information about the history of Dancehall music. 

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DISCLAIMER:
Since people visit different countries and/or emigrate to other countries, some of these comments may be from people who were not born in the nation that is mentioned in the comment.

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SELECTED COMMENTS: DANCEHALL REGGAE MEMORIES FROM VARIOUS AFRICAN NATIONS 
  
There are a number of other comments from Africans in the YouTube Dancehall Reggae discussion threads that I've read. However, these are the only comments that I've come  across which mention a geographic location in those nations and also refers to Dancehall Reggae memories. 

These YouTube discussion threads excerpts are given in no particular order. 

Numbers are added for referencing purposes only.

Excerpt #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1Ek7U8j5Jg DANCEHALL LEGENDS MIX PT 1 - Super Cat, Shabba Ranks, Chaka Demus, Cutty Ranks, Road Ready Mix, Mar 22, 2015 

1. Anthony Mendy, 2016
"good vibes, love it. Reminds me of the music  back the days in Gambia. Big up them Gambia youths... reggae massive!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! boooom!!!!!!!!!!"

**
2. St. Peterson, 2021
"Am from Nigeria but we jammed all this dubs way back then in the 90's. , playing it  now in 2021 brings back sweet old memories. We call it rub-a-dub jam back home in Nigeria.Thanks to the dj. One love bro"

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Excerpt #2
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7ccW_ocVj4 Bam Bam Riddim (Murder She Wrote) Garnett Silk, Cutty Ranks, Nardo Ranks πŸ‡―πŸ‡², Aug 17, 2019

1. Stephen Adol, 2022
"Every Kenyan kid had their own version of BamBam and Murder She Wrote in the early 90s."

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Excerpt #3 
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PfEQTBrlJU Old School Dancehall Mix 2020 by Subsonic Squad. Dec 18, 2020

1. AwemanyFit, 2022
"Any Nigerian hereπŸ˜πŸ‡³πŸ‡¬

Remember these old school songs they play in parties when we were much younger😍. Wow time passes"

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Excerpt #4
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PfEQTBrlJU Old School Dancehall Mix 2020 by Subsonic Squad, Dec 18, 2020

1. Linda Mpofu, 2021
"this mix is fire..took me back to afternoon clubbing sessions back home in Zimbabwe. I was 15/16 cant believe they let us in them clubs grinding on grown ass men..hahahaha"

**
2. Shaz Isbusy, 2021
"High school vibes during entertainment....Kenyan style......πŸ‘"

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Excerpt #5
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJdxv_L-iCc&t=1144s Dancehall old school back to the 90s mix by djeasy, Sep 16, 2015

1. prime business solutions, 2019
"that was music revolution, Big up music makers Big up black giant and silverstone in zimbabwe big up all Tafara high 1 1993-96 massive'n crew"

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Excerpt #6
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4jM_cpFy60 PEPPER SEED RIDDIM (MIXED BY TWALA), published by TWALA876, Mar 17, 2012

1. ras Tyger Marufu, 2018
"This is da baddest reminds me of the Agony Centre Harare Zimbabwe in the 90s"

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Excerpt #7
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvQsXWgIAxE 90s & 2000s DANCEHALL PARTY MIX ~ MIXED BY DJ XCLUSIVE G2B ~ Beenie Man, Shabba Ranks, Buju & More, publiahed by Xclusive Music, Sep 5, 2019  

1. Sir Abdull, 2020
"Nairobi was the best place to be around that era

Damn Dj,you toook me back to good all days

Club florida 2000 was the place to be every sunday from 2pm"
-snip-
Nairobi is the capital of Kenya.

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Excerpt #8
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkwHH8INaQ4 90's Old School Dancehall Mix-Buju Banton,Spragga Benz,Beenie Man, Lady Saw,Baby Sham, Wayne Wonder, published by DJ Dalvy876, May 15, 2020 

1. OFORI MEDIAP, 2020
"I am a Nigerian, this are the songs I grew up with. Massive boncrew to my legends here, earthstrong to y'all. Lucky Okri say so"

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Reply
2. Zayd Kcoppel Muzic, 2020
"Ofari mediap.. Its massive and crew..."

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3. JΓΊnia FogΓ£o, 2020
"Wauuuuu I remember when I was form 3 in Zim. Yeeee dancehall that's my favorite. Hmmmmm I LIKE IT"

**
4. Lamin Fatty, 2021
"Nuff respect, best lineups of our youth ages, from GAMBIA πŸ‡¬πŸ‡²,"

**
5. Tafadzwa Tagarira, 2022
"Brings back high school memories & also Circus nite club in Gweru Zimbabwe πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡Ό"

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This concludes Part IV of this pancocojams series.

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