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Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Black People Nodding At Other Black People Who Are Strangers (Article Excerpts & Comments)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents excerpts from four online articles about the custom of Black people nodding at other Black people who are strangers. Comments from some of those articles are including in this post.

This pancocojams post is part of an ongoing pancocojams series about the custom of Black people nodding at other Black people who are strangers. This custom is often referred to as "the nod" or "the Black nod".

Click the tag "video, articles, and comments about "the nod"" to find other pancocojams posts about this subject.

The content of this post is presented for socio-cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

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DEFINITION OF "THE NOD" [as used in this post]
From https://workinprogress.oowsection.org/2017/06/01/the-black-nod-what-a-simple-gesture-tell-us-about-congress/ "The “Black Nod”: What a simple gesture tell us about Congress" by Guest Contributor, June 1, 2017
..."The nod is a gesture of acknowledgment. The interaction begins with establishing eye contact and then is followed by a subtle lowering of the head. As many participants explained the nod was not a gesture that was unique to Capitol Hill, but that they regularly used to signal solidarity to other Black people in majority-white environments.
-snip-
According to a number of persons writing or commenting online about this custom, "the nod" can either be performed as a quick uplift of the chin or a quick lowering the head.
-snip-
A longer excerpt of this article is given as Excerpt #2 below.

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ARTICLE EXCERPTS & COMMENTS
These article excerpts and comments are given in no particular order and are numbered for referencing purposes only.

Excerpt #1

From https://www.beenaroundtheglobe.com/nod-black-person/ THE NOD (WHEN YOU’RE BLACK) BY ROOBENS, 07/01/2019
..."When you’re black and you find yourself in an area with almost no black people, you inevitably went through the famous black nod. A slight nod you do to another black person you see in the street. Very subtle, very quick. If you walk next to me and you look away just for a few seconds, you probably won’t see I just did the head nod to another black person I just passed by. Yeah, that’s how it is, traveling while black, we greet each other!

Generally, we do the nod furtively and quite fast. This is something we do naturally, but it causes confusion and bewillderment among the non-black people who saw me nodding to another black man. “Huh… Do you know him?“, asked an Austrian girl, after watching me greeting a black guy in Samarkand. “Nope, I don’t know him” “But… Why did you say hi to him then???“

[...]

In several areas in the world, you don’t expect at all to see another black person. You spend full days exploring a city/a region/a country, never bumping into a single black person! And all of a sudden, on a beautiful day, you finally spot one! You’re then overwhelmed with a feeling, a mix of surprise, acknowledgement, and support, and instinctively, you’re gonna greet each other. Implicitly, you’re happy to see “a brother, one of us”, in a place where you’re a very small minority. “Cool, I’m not alone!“. There’s some implied sense of “kinship”.

It’s a sign of acknowledgement, of camaraderie, a sign of a bond between us, and it’s also a way to say “I’m right there with you!” It’s a bit weird… In fact, it’s as if you were exploring an unknown territory, potentially hostile (I talked about it in my article about the fear of racism when traveling*), and just the fact to see another black person, makes you feel more comfortable.

[...]

I have to clarify one thing. It only happens when traveling -yeah you’re reading a travel blog- at least in my experience. I never nodded to a black guy -or got the nod- in a city full of black people. Never where I live in Paris, nor in London, in Western Europe in general, or in the US. It returns to and it reinforces what I said earlier : it usually only happens in areas where we’re a very small minority. When it happens, the reactions are different. As I said, usually, the chin rises up a little bit, and returns back to its regular position. Sometimes we shake hands (it happened in New Delhi), sometimes we even hug and we start having a conversation (it happened in Ella, Sri Lanka).

I noticed that usually, black people from the US are more inclined to nod and start a conversation than black people from Europe. It must be cultural, and Americans (in general, not just black people!) travel a lot less than Europeans. I guess they’re even more delighted to see a brother. But yeah, we also do the nod, black guys not from the US. I remember that black girl from the US, her face lit up when she saw me “My maaaaan!!! How are you? You’re on vacation! It’s so cool to see you here! etc…” We started talking as if we were two old friends running into each other and happy to meet up. Black Americans are more inclined to start a conversation “Hey! How you doin? Where you from? What are you doing here? Having fun?” Black Europeans will content themselves with a head nod, and they’ll keep walking.

[...]

However, I never do the nod first to a woman, it can be misinterpreted and I don’t want to get in trouble #metoo. If she does the black nod first, then I’ll respond with a head nod as well. Otherwise I don’t do it.

[...]

As I said, the black nod is mostly done in areas where we’re a very small minority. By the way, you can apply this rule to any minority group. I talked earlier about the white people in rural areas in India, the rare tourists in East Timor… To go further, the bikers and the cyclists also do the nod when they pass by each other (a minority group compared to the cars, and there’s a sense of belonging to a group)."....
-snip-
*Here's the link to the article that is mentioned in that excerpt: https://www.beenaroundtheglobe.com/fear-racism-travel/.
-snip-
Here's a comment from that article's discussion thread:
Teja says

11/01/2019
"Actually, I’ve noticed white expats always greet each other here. They will tend to nod or even say a greeting, and neither one necessarily knows the other. But they don’t do it to non-whites (like in an elevator, this is very noticeable). It always irritates me, especially when my American white colleague is greeted, and I’m like right next to her and ignored. But maybe it is the same thing as ‘the nod’.

Malaysians tend to be 50-50 – the delight in finding a countryman (and that the countryman was identified correctly and isn’t actually Filipino, for example) has to exceed the natural shyness we have with bothering strangers. But the best example has to be when I did my Masters degree in Wales, where there were very few Malaysians in a small and quite isolated Welsh town.

I was just registered into uni, walking down the hill with my parents, and suddenly a car stopped next to us on the road. Then a window rolled down, and the driver stuck his head out, calling out with a totally typical Malay phrasing, “Melayu ke?” (You Malay?) And that was how I got a surrogate family in Wales (along with the home-cooked meal benefits that come with it!)"

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Excerpt #2
From https://workinprogress.oowsection.org/2017/06/01/the-black-nod-what-a-simple-gesture-tell-us-about-congress/ "The “Black Nod”: What a simple gesture tell us about Congress" by Guest Contributor,
June 1, 2017
..."What does the “Black nod” mean?

The nod is a gesture of acknowledgment. The interaction begins with establishing eye contact and then is followed by a subtle lowering of the head. As many participants explained the nod was not a gesture that was unique to Capitol Hill, but that they regularly used to signal solidarity to other Black people in majority-white environments.

As they put it, the nod meant “I see you.” The nod then became a tool that they used make to themselves and others like them visible. As many participants explained the nod was not a gesture that was unique to Capitol Hill, but that they regularly used to signal solidarity to other Black people in majority-white environments.

As they put it, the nod meant “I see you.” The nod then became a tool that they used make to themselves and others like them visible.

In Congress, the exchange of the nod became a moment in which Black staffers could convey and share, albeit briefly, the struggles and frustrations of working in a majority-white institution.

[...]

In some ways, the limited sample of White staffers interviewed who were unaware of the nodding practice before them confirms the invisibility of Black staffers. Encounters like this fed a general racial paranoia about the status of Black workers in Congress and distributions of power. These perceptions of race and power reaffirmed the importance of nodding.

Respondents said nodding was important, but not everyone nodded. An analysis of not nodding revealed important gender, class, and age distinctions and the performative elements of race.

While Black women participated in nodding, they almost never initiated the exchange as it could be misconstrued as a sexual advance.

In addition, respondents inferred class distinctions about those who did not nod, suggesting that their privileged positon meant they were “not down with the race”. Older and veteran Black staffers lamented that younger staffers did not nod and understand the importance of sticking together even as the size of group expanded in recent decades.

When respondents discussed moments in which a nod was not initiated or reciprocated they unknowingly expressed their thoughts about what the Black community on Capitol Hill should be.”...

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Excerpt #3
From https://www.247liveculture.com/the-nod-the-common-courtesy-every-black-man-needs-to-know/culture "The Nod: The Common Courtesy Every Black Man Needs To Know" By: Omar Cook
...”The nod is the common courtesy that every black man needs to know! I don't know how it came about but the simple fact is that if you're a black man in America, you need to have this as a tool. The act of nodding your heading up or down is a sure sign of acknowledgement, as if you're saying to that person, "I see you, we're in this together." The nod is the next best thing to dapping a person up and it literally takes one second and you go about your business.

There is a difference between the downward nod and the upward nod though. Usually, when you give the upward nod, it's to someone you know, someone of the same age, or you might just be at a considerable distance that nodding your head up is the best way that person might see the gesture. You usually nod your head down as a sign of respect to someone that is older than you or complete strangers. Either you can't go wrong, but you should never let a passing moment between two black men go by without acknowledging him.

Black men share the same struggles together in America and this simple sign of respect is just a small gesture of unity. IF a black ever walks by you, and doesn't look at you to acknowledge you with the nod, thats a red flag and there's a problem. Honestly, I almost feel disrespected if a black man doesn't look to make eye contact and give this universal sign of respect. That brother wasn't raised right! I'm writing this post not only to spread cultural awareness about this common courtesy, but to gather the attention of the black men out there who don't do this! It's 2018, and with racial tensions getting hotter, it's a MUST that black men respect each other, stick together, and at the very least acknowledge each other's presence.”...

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Excerpt #4
From https://medium.com/matter/the-nod-a-subtle-lowering-of-the-head-to-another-black-person-in-an-overwhelmingly-white-place-e12bfa0f833f
"The Nod: A Subtle Lowering of the Head You Give to Another Black Person in an Overwhelmingly White Place", Musa Okwonga, Oct 16, 2014
"If you’re a black person who has ever visited a place where there aren’t many other black people, then you will be familiar with The Nod. The Nod is just that: An almost imperceptible lowering of the head toward any other black person you might encounter on your travels through, say, Slovakia or Russia.

Yet The Nod is also so much more than that: It’s a swift yet intimate statement of ethnic solidarity. The Nod is saying, “Wow, well, I really didn’t expect to see another one of us out here, but you seem to be doing your thing just fine. More power to you, and all the very best."...
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Selected comments from this article's comment section:
a. A Jones, Nov 5, 2015 ·
What some of the people below that are saying that “The Nod” is not a black thing are ignoring the premise of this article. It is not making a statement that Black men created it and are the only people doing, it’s about the what “The Nod” means to us. It is a means of acknowledge of struggle and accomplishment. You might nod to say, “Hey how’s it going?” but it means a little bit more for us."
-snip-
This commenter doesn't have a screen photograph.

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REPLY
b. Chaveevah Cheryl Banks Ferguson, Nov 6, 2015
"I agree with A Jones. The author has not said that The Nod is EXCLUSIVE to Black people, that Black people ‘created’ it, etc — only that, amongst Black people, it has a special significance when you see another Black person in a place where you totally did not expect to see them. Why is that such a problem for non-Black people, that they have to generalize — and thereby, dismiss/devalue whatever specific meaning it might hold for the author? Okay, so you’ve also had this experience. Good. That STILL does not lessen the value/impact of what the author is trying to convey. It’s unfortunate, but unless ‘they’ are central to whatever story or example is being offered, some whites seem to be offended by tales of camaraderie that Black people experience with other Black people. One commenter, Jeremiah, was particularly ridiculous — to suggest that acknowledging another Black person in a foreign land, culturally homogeneous venue, etc, is somehow ‘segregating’ is the height of the “me-first” mindset that needs to be checked at the door. Acknowledging ANOTHER Black person doesn’t mean the author ONLY acknowledged other Black people. Get over yourself!"
-snip-
The commenter’s screen photo is of a Black woman.

**
c. Sigil, Nov 9, 2015
“The nod” is reassurance that you are not alone. That simple gesture can sustain, motivate and give peace to both. The intent of the nod is what is unique."
-snip-
This commenter doesn't have a screen photograph.

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d. Nomfundo Sarah Msomi, Dec 4, 2015
"I’m a South African in Hong Kong (via India, a small Liberal Arts college in New York, the Development Studies department at the University of Oxford, and the creative industries in London and New York). The nod — I’ve given it, I’ve received it, it’s very much a part of my life. Great piece."
-snip-
The commenter’s screen photo is of a Black woman.

**
e. Elizabeth Wright, Feb 23, 2016
"Mexican people do a nod here. I think it’s more like lifting the chin to acknowledge someone from the same background. The same motion can mean a string of other things depending on context, but the acknowledgement gesture is pretty consistent."
-snip-
The commenter's screen photo is difficult to decipher.

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Michael Jackson In Children's Rhymes: "I Don't Want To Go To Hollywood No More More More"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents some information and six examples of the children's hand clap rhyme "I Don't Want To Go To Hollywood No More More More" (also given as "I Don't Want To Go To Hollywood") that mention pop star Michael Jackson.

These are the only examples of this rhyme that I have found as of this date.*

Information about the source rhyme "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico" is also given in this post and in the comment section below.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, cultural, and recreational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.
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Click the "Michael Jackson in children's rhymes" tag for more pancocojams posts on that subject. This is the last post that I plan to publish in that pancocojams series.

Also, click the "children's rhyme" tag and other tags below for more pancocojams posts about hand clap rhymes and other children's recreational rhymes.

*It's possible that other versions of "I Don't Want To Go To Hollywood No More More More" (with or without mentioning Michael Jackson) were posted to comment threads of YouTube videos that featured children under 13 years of age. However, all of the comments to these videos were deleted in accordance with the February 28, 2019 policy that disallowed comments on those YouTube videos. As a community folklorist, I deeply regret that all of those comments were deleted as those comment threads were rich sources of contemporary examples of children's hand clap rhymes that are seldom found elsewhere online or offline.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/11/my-comments-about-youtubes-policy.html for a pancocojams post entitled "YouTube Information & My Comments About YouTube's Policy Enacted February 2019 Which Disallows Comments For Most YouTube Children's Videos"

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
By "children's rhymes" I mean recreational rhymes that are may or may not have been composed by children, but are documented as being chanted by children while playing hand clap games, jumping rope, or recited as taunting rhymes or parodies, or used as counting out strategies.

Most of the examples that are included in this post contain no information about how the rhyme is performed. However, my guess is that all of these examples are hand clap rhymes.

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE RHYMES "I DON'T WANT TO GO TO MEXICO" & "I DON'T WANT TO GO TO HOLLYWOOD NO MORE MORE MORE"
Here's a portion of my notes from http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/09/the-real-origin-of-i-dont-to-go-to.htmlThe REAL Origin Of "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico" Rhymes (also known as "Shame")
..."Judging from the number of online examples of this rhyme, including the number of YouTube videos, "I Don’t Want To Go To Mexico” appears to be a widely known hand clap rhyme in the United States.

[...]

"I Don't Want To Go To Hollywood" is a (probably purposely) folk processed form of the widely known (in the United States) hand clap rhyme "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico". The source for "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico" is the jump rope rhyme “I Don’t Want To Go To Macy’s.” Roger Abraham notes in his collection Jump-Rope Dictionary that "I Don't Want To Go To Macy's" is documented as being performed by American children in 1938. “Macy’s” is the name of a chain of department stores. The most famous Macy's store is located in New York City.

My theory is that the word "Mexico" was substituted "Mexico" for "Macys" since children weren't familiar with the "Macy's" store or the word “Macy’s”. This is an example of “folk etymology”. Folk etymology occurs when people change foreign words or unfamiliar words into familiar words or sounds that are similar to the word they don’t know.

[...]

Since at least the 2000s, it appears that in the United States the rhyme "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico No More" is usually known as "Shame". That title comes from the introductory words "Shame Shame Shame" that are said before the rhyme's hand clapping pattern and the words for that rhyme actually began. The word "Shame!" is also usually said at the end of many examples of "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico". In the context of these rhymes, "Shame" means "Aren't you ashamed?" or "You should be ashamed". The title "Shame" for "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico" rhymes (including other versions in this rhyme family such as "I Don't Want To Go To Hollywood") originated with African Americans.

It should be noted that there are other children's hand clap rhymes that also begin with the words "Shame Shame Shame".* However, usually when African American girls say that they are going to do [the rhyme] "Shame", they mean "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico".
*In this video, the rhyme "Brick Wall Waterfall" that is performed by two African American girls begins with the introductory phrase "Shame, Shame, Shame": in https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=br9fAi7HdDk.

**
Since at least the 1990, in many versions of "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico", the word "Mexico" is replaced with some other place that the chanters don't want to go- i.e. "I don't want to go to Hollywood", "I Don't Want To Go To College", or "I don't want to go to school". However, one example that I found replaced "Mexico" with "Disney World", which is usually a place where children want to go. (As a reminder, the word "Mexico" in this rhyme is a folk processed form of the store name "Macys").

If the word "Hollywood" in those rhymes represents a place that people don't want to go to, it may reflect many Americans' dislike of trashy films, and egotistic rich people who flaunt their wealth and lord it over other people.
**

In some contemporary rhymes, the "policeman" is replaced by "Michael Jackson" (i.e. there's a big fat Michael Jackson at the door", or "there's a skinny Michael Jackson at the door" or "there's a fake Michael Jackson at the door"). Some examples replace "policeman" with "a cute boy" or "two cute boys", or "a tall man" etc. Usually in those rhymes, the person or persons at the door takes the girl by the hips and kisses her on her lips. In other versions, the person takes the girl by the pants and makes her do a dance.

As of the date of this post's publication, I have only found one folk processed version of "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico" that mentions another celebrity except Michael Jackson. That celebrity is Elvis Presley, although his name is misspelled in that example:
Sham,sham,sham
I don't want to go Tennisee
No more,more,more
there is a big fat Elves
at my door,door,door
He'll grab me by the wrist
Make me do the twist
I don't want to go Tennisee
No more,more,more
-Anonymous on Sunday, November 19, 2000 [www. streetplay.com- This website is no longer available.

A risque (1990s or later?) version of "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico" that appears to be quite widely chanted has the person or persons at the door (policeman, Michael Jackson, cute boy etc) peeing on the floor. (Notice that "door" and "floor" rhyme), suggesting that "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico" or, at least, this version of that rhyme is chanted by children as a way to challenge society's rules and experience being a little bit bad (i.e. not good) in a safe, relatively consequences free way.

For the record, when I was collecting examples of children's rhymes and cheers in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (beginning in 1985, but most actively from 1997-2008), the only examples of "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico" that I collected had the words that referenced "Mexico" and "policeman" and the words of those examples didn't include any peeing on the floor.

**
Although it wasn't an element in early examples of this rhyme, by at least the 1980s, a competitive and aggressive, if not violent, ending was added to "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico" rhymes (whatever their titles/words). For instance, both partners doing the hand clap routine shout "Shame!" (or shout "Shut the door!") and try to be the first person to tap, poke, or hit their partner on the forehead. The person who is the first one to complete that action "wins" that hand clapping "contest".
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*Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/11/information-about-examples-of-hand-clap.html for this pancocojams post entitled Information About & Examples Of The Hand Clap Rhyme "Michael Jackson Went To Town".

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EXAMPLES OF THE HAND CLAP RHYME "I DON'T WANT TO GO TO MEXICO" THAT MENTION MICHAEL JACKSON
These examples are given in chronological order with the oldest dated example given first. Note that that date doesn't mean that that is the earliest example of "I Don't Want To Go To Hollywood" that mentions Michael Jackson. It just means that it is the earliest example of that rhyme that I've collected as of this date.

Note that I haven't found any examples of this rhyme that is combined with other verses, such as verses of "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky", "I Pledge Allegiance To Flag", or "Coca Cola Went To Town" (or its variant form "Michael Jackson Went To Town".

1. Sham,sham,sham
I don't want to go hollywood
No more,more,more
there is a big fat Michel jackson
At my door,door,door
he'll grab me by the hips
Make me kiss his lips
I don't want to go hollywood
No more,more,more
-Anonymous on Sunday, November 19, 2000, http://www.streetplay.com/discus/
Streetplay.com Discussion: Girl Games: Singing: Silly songs, theme songs, etc.: Archive through November 27, 2000 [This website is no longer be available.]

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2. Shame Shame Shame
I don't want to go to Hollywood no more, more, more
There's a Michael Jackson at the door, door door
He grabbed me by my hips
Made me kiss his lips
I don't want to go to Mexico
No more, more, more.
-from The Man who Adores the Negro: Race and American Folklore by Patrick B. Mullen [University of Illinois Press, 2008, page 161, 162]

The analysis that Patrick B. Mullen wrote of this rhyme in quoted in the comment section for this pancocojams post.

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3. shame shame shame,
i don’t wanna go to hollywood no more more more,
theres a fat michale jackson
at the door door door,
he grabbed me by the hips,
kissed me on the lips,
i don’t wanna go to hollywood no more more more
-Shasta, http://losemyway.wordpress.com/2008/02/06/hand-clapping-games/ No More 3x5's Hand Clapping Games; August 12, 2010

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4. i dont wanna go to hollywood no more more more theres a skiny micheal jackson ant the door door door so he grabbed me by my hips kissed me on the lips i dont wanna go to hollywood no more more more
-Ja’ Kayla Jasmine, 2013 https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=26&v=e0KMFSj-FrQ [comment]

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5. Shame, shame, shame, I don't want to go to Hollywood no more, more, more. There's a fake Michael Jackson at the door, door, door. Grabbed me by the hips, kissed me on the lips, I don't want to go to Hollywood no more, more, more SHAME! — Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.194.118.238 (talk) 04:39, 27 July 2014 (UTC)"
-snip-
This example was given as an "alternative lyrics" for a version of "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico"

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6. i dont wanna go to hollywood no more more more theres a skiny micheal jackson ant the door door door so he grabbed me by my hips kissed me on the lips i dont wanna go to hollywood no more more more
-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0KMFSj-FrQ [comment in Fun hand games, fatcat123455Dec 24, 2011; no commenter's name or date retrieved

That video's comment section is still open as it's not affected by the February 28, 2019 ban on comments for videos that feature children ages 13 years and older as it features two young women.

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Monday, November 11, 2019

Information About & Examples Of The Hand Clap Rhyme "Michael Jackson Went To Town"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents some information about pop star Michael Jackson and presents information about and some examples of the children's hand clap rhyme "Michael Jackson Went To Town" (also found as "Michael Jackson Came To Town".

The Addendum to this post presents two examples of "Michael Jordan Went To Town" rhymes.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, cultural, and recreational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.
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Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/11/information-about-some-examples-of-hand.html for the closely related pancocojams post entitled "Information About & Some Examples Of The Hand Clap Rhymes "Coca Cola Went To Town"

Also, click the "children's rhyme" tag and other tags below for more pancocojams posts about hand clap rhymes and other children's recreational rhymes.

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
By "children's rhymes" I mean recreational rhymes that are may or may not have been composed by children, but are documented as being chanted by children while playing hand clap games, jumping rope, or recited as taunting rhymes or parodies, or used as counting out strategies.

Most of the examples that are included in this post contain no information about how the rhyme is performed. However, my guess is that all of these examples are hand clap rhymes.

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INFORMATION ABOUT MICHAEL JACKSON
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Jackson
Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958 – June 25, 2009) was an American singer, songwriter, and dancer. Dubbed the "King of Pop", he is regarded as one of the most significant cultural figures of the 20th century and one of the greatest entertainers. Jackson's contributions to music, dance, and fashion, along with his publicized personal life, made him a global figure in popular culture for over four decades.

[...]

The eighth child of the Jackson family, Michael made his professional debut in 1964 with his elder brothers Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, and Marlon as a member of the Jackson 5. He began his solo career in 1971 while at Motown Records, and in the early 1980s, became a dominant figure in popular music. His music videos, including those for "Beat It", "Billie Jean", and "Thriller" from his 1982 album Thriller, are credited with breaking racial barriers and transforming the medium into an art form and promotional tool. Their popularity helped bring the television channel MTV to fame. Bad (1987) was the first album to produce five US Billboard Hot 100 number-one singles."...

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE HAND CLAP RHYMES "COCA COLA CAME TO TOWN" & "MICHAEL JACKSON WENT TO TOWN"
"Coca Cola Went To Town" and its variant form "Michael Jackson Went To Town" are composed using a similar format to what I call "trading rhymes". (Probably the most well known example of a "trading rhyme" is "Hush Little Baby")*. In trading rhymes one item is found to be somehow defective and is traded for another item which itself is found to be defective, and this pattern continues again and again.

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hush,_Little_Baby

In the two rhymes that are the focus of this post, one beverage comes into town only to be beaten up by another beverage. Another beverage either beats up that second beverage or other circumstances cause it to be replaced by yet another beverage. This pattern continues again and again (usually) until the first beverage again becomes the beverage of choice.

"Coca Cola Went To Town" and "Michael Jackson Went To Town" obliquely refer to people's experiences with or perceptions about what has been called "the cola wars" in the United States. Here's information about "the cola wars" from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cola_wars
"The long-time rival soft drink producers The Coca-Cola Company and PepsiCo have engaged mutually-targeted marketing campaigns for the direct competition between each company's product lines, especially their flagship colas, Coca-Cola and Pepsi. Beginning in the late 1970s and into the 1980s, the intensity of these campaigns have led to them, and the competition in general, being known as the cola wars.[1]

[...]

During the peak of the cola wars, as Coca-Cola saw its flagship product losing market share to Pepsi, as well as to Diet Coke and competitors' products, the company considered a change to the beverage's formula and flavor. In April 1985, The Coca-Cola Company introduced its new formula for Coca-Cola, which became popularly known as "New Coke". Consumer backlash to the change led to the company making a strategic retreat on July 11, 1985, announcing its plans to bring back the previous formula under the name "Coca-Cola Classic".[2]"...
-snip-
Some examples of "Coca Cola Went To Town" feature other cola products such as "Diet Pepsi" as the lead cola in that rhyme. Read #5 given below as an example of this.

****
****
My guess is that examples of "Coca Cola Went To Town" rhymes may have been first chanted in the early 1980s. It's likely that a number of versions of "Coca Cola Went To Town" were composed shortly after 1984 as they obliquely refer to Michael Jackson and his song "Billy Jean". In 1984 pop star Micheal Jackson's hair caught on fire when a fire works exploded while he filmed a Pepsi commercial singing a re-worked version of his hit song "Billy Jean".

Michael Jackson’s superstar status and the fact that he was filming a Pepsi commercial explains why many children started chanting versions of "Coca Cola Went To Town" that used his name instead of that original title. The details about that incident also explain why the girl's name "Billie Jean" (or some folk processed version of that name such as "jelly beans") is a part of many versions of that "Michael Jackson Went To Town" rhyme.

However, the fact that most examples of that rhyme end with a line such as "now we're back to Coke" suggests that those versions of that rhyme weren't composed until 1985 when Coca Cola brought back the original formula for Coke (as per the Wikipedia article quoted above). Read the example of "Coca Cola Went To Town" that is given in the comment section for the pancocojams post about "Coca Cola Went To Town" [link iven above]. That comment mentions 1985 as the date that that commenter chanted a "Coca Cola Went To Town" rhyme that includes the name "Michael Jackson."

****
The "Coca Cola Went To Town" (and the "Michael Jackson Went To Town") rhyme can be chanted alone or in combination with other hand clap rhymes, for instance, as part of long versions of the hand clap rhyme "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky". Versions of "Coca Cola Went To Town" that mention Michael Jackson were very likely composed after that pop star's hair caught on fire accident.

It's doubtful that many children who recite/d "Coca Cola Went To Town" or Michael Jackson Went To Town" are/were aware of the background for the words for those rhymes. And it's probably doubtful that a child composed the original "Coca Cola Went To Town" rhyme.

****
EXAMPLES OF THE HAND CLAP RHYME "MICHAEL JACKSON WENT TO TOWN"
These examples are given in no particular order with their source given after the rhyme. When the "Coca Cola Went To Town" verse is combined with other verses, I'v written it in italics to highlight it. Numbers are added for referencing purposes only.

1. "Down by the river near the hankey pank
where the bullfrogs jump from bank, to bank,
and they say E I O U,
your momma stinks and so do you
so ping pong ding dong
your daddy smells like king kong.
Ask your teacher what she wears,
polka dotted underwear.
Not too big and not too small,
just the size of city hall.
Michael Jackson went to town,
coca-cola brought him down.
Coca-cola brought him up,
now he's drinking 7up.
7up with no cafiene, now he's seein' belgain (pronounced beligene).
Belgain is outta sight,
now we're talking dynamite.

10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, BAM!"
-Veggie, August 21, 2006, cocojams.com [Tis website is no longer available]

****
2. "Down by the river
To the hanky pank
Where the bullfrog jumps
from bank to bank
saying E I O U
Your mama stinks and so do you
So ding dong ping pong
Your daddy smells like king kong.
Michael Jackson went to town
Dr. Pepper brought him down
Coca Cola brought him up
Now he's drinking 7-Up
7-Up with no caffine
Now we're talking Billy Jean

Inky Binky Bonky, Daddy had a Donkey
Donkey died
Daddy cried
Inky Binky Bonkey
-Guest ,ME!,6/25/2008, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034 "Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky"

****
3. "downon by the river side hanky panky
were the bullfrogs jump from bank
saying a-e-i-o-u bamboo
a-e-i-o-u bamboo
michel jakson came to town
coca cola shot hem down
dr.pepper fixed him
up now were talking 7-up
7-up has no cafene
now were talking bilajean
bilajean has no caffeine
no caffene no caffeine

1234 shut the door enless u ant to here more
-Guest, maeson A., June 27, 2008, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034 "Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky"

****
4. "Down by the bank by the hanky pank
where the bullfrog jumped from bank to bank
singing eeeps ops ohps ooops
listen to the rythym of the ding dang dong
michael jackson went to town
pepsi cola shot him down
dr. pepper fixed him up
now we're talking 7up
7up has no caffiene
now we're billie jean

billie jean went down the street singing
dooo waaah diddy didy dum diddy dooo
-Guest; Mudcat: November 6, 2009; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034 "Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky"

****
5. "at my school it goes like this. (some lyrics are missing, though)

Down by the river of the hanky panky
where bullfrogs jump from bank to banky
say a,e,i,o,u
old lady said "ding dong"
Yo mama smell like king kong
michael jackson came to town
coca cola brought him down (note: him is michael jackson)
coca cola brought him up
now we're talkin' seven up
seven up has no caffiene
now we're talking billie jean

billie jean (is) insane at night
now we're talkin' dynamite
dynamite blew up the school
now we're talkin' really cool

and that's all I know. :)
-GUEST,hiroko, 05 Apr 09; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034 "Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky"

****
6. "this is how it go:down by the riverside siad a hanky panky said bull frog jump frog yo mama stanky said a A-E-I-O-U BAM BOO micheal jackson went to town coke cola shot him down 7 up a doulbe these now im talkin beligue 7up a double threes i said i do i didnt didnt dong didnt do i said i do i didnt didnt dong didnt do 1,2,3 base on me
-GUEST,345; 28 Apr 09, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034 "Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky"

****
7. "down by the banks of the Hanky Panky
where the bull frogs jump from bank to banky
With the epps
ipps
ohpps
opps
chilly willy ding dong
your mother smells like king kong
micheal jackson came to town
coke cola shot him down
docter pepper brought him up
now were talkin 7up
7up with no caffine
now were takin billie jean
bille jean is out of sight
now were takin' dinamite

10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1
boom!

A friend taught me that and afew
other things awhile ago...."
- GUEST,Alicia, 06 Jan 10; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034 "Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky"

****
8. "Down by the banks of the hanky pank,
where the bullfrogs jump from bank 2 bank,
sayin eeps, ipes, opes, oops,
listen to the rhythm of the ding dang dong.
Micheal Jackson went to town,
pepsi cola shot im down
Dr Pepper fixed im up,
now were talkin 7up
7up has no caffine,
now were talkin billy jean.

billy jean was walking down the street singin,
Ooh, I diddy diddy dum diddy doo.
Lincoln, Lincoln I been thinkin.
what on earth have you been drinkin
is it whiskey is it wine
OMG its turpentine 123...9
-MufinCat123, http://www.youtube.com/all_comments?v=ZC8INeM0w5A, 2011

****
9. "Where the bullfrogs jump from bank to bank saying pies ipes opes epes Listen to the rythem of the sing dang song Michael Jackson went to town Coco Cola shot him down Dr Pepper fixed him up Now we are talking seven Up Seven up has no caffeine now we are talking Billy Jean Billie Jean was walking down the street singing oh I diddly diddly doo Lincoln Lincoln I been thinking what on earth have you been drinking is it whiskey is wine oh my gosh it's turbinetine 123 9"
skyetf, 2013; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4_3DRn049g&feature=emb_logo; "Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky - Clap Game", Jenny Rice, Oct 10, 2012

****
ADDENDUM: "MICHAEL JORDAN WENT TO TOWN" RHYMES
Pancocojams Editor's Note:
I've found two examples of "[other celebrity's name] Went To Town" that use the name of basketball star Michael Jordan. I believe that these chanters confused "Michael Jordan" for Michael Jackson, as both of these celebrities have the name "Michael" and both of these last name begin with the letter "m". Also, both of these last names begin with the letter "J".
Here's a biography of Michael Jordan:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Jordan
"Michael Jeffrey Jordan (born February 17, 1963), also known by his initials MJ,[5] is an American former professional basketball player and the principal owner of the Charlotte Hornets of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played 15 seasons in the NBA, winning six championships with the Chicago Bulls. His biography on the official NBA website states: "By acclamation, Michael Jordan is the greatest basketball player of all time."[6] He was one of the most effectively marketed athletes of his generation and was considered instrumental in popularizing the NBA around the world in the 1980s and 1990s.[7]"...

Here are those two examples that I've found as of this date:

1."Here is the one
I know:

Down by the banks of the hanky Panky
where the bullfrogs jump from bank to bank
with an a e i o u
Michael jordan went to town
coca cola shot him down
Mountain dew shot him up
now were talkin 7 up
7 up has no cafene
now were talkin billie jean

billie jean went down the street singin
doo a dilly dilly dum dilly do
singin do a dilly dily dum dilly do"
-Guest,Jenny, 08 Apr 09; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034 "Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky"

****
2. "Down by the banks of the hanky panky
where the bullfrogs jump from bank to bank
with an a, e, i, o, u. bang bang
micheal jordan went to town
coca cola shot him down
now were talkin 7up
7up with no caffein
now were talking billy jean

billy jean went down the street singin
do wah diddy diddy dum diddy do
singin do wah diddy diddy dum diddy do
-GUEST,SaeraLove, 03 Nov 09, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034 "Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky"

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Sunday, November 10, 2019

Information About & Some Examples Of The Hand Clap Rhymes "Coca Cola Went To Town"

Edited by Azizi Powell

Latest Revision: November 11, 2019

WARNING: This pancocojams post's comment section includes the pejorative word "fag".

This pancocojams post presents some information about pop star Michael Jackson and presents information about and some examples of the children's hand clap rhyme "Coca Cola Went To Town".

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, cultural, and recreational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks for the publisher of the YouTube videos that are embedded in this post.
-snip-
Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/11/information-about-examples-of-hand-clap.html for the closely related pancocojams post entitled "Information About & Examples Of The Hand Clap Rhyme "Michael Jackson Went To Town".

Click the "children's rhyme" tag and other tags below for more pancocojams posts about hand clap rhymes and other children's recreational rhymes.

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
By "children's rhymes" I mean recreational rhymes that are may or may not have been composed by children, but are documented as being chanted by children while playing hand clap games, jumping rope, or recited as taunting rhymes or parodies, or used as counting out strategies.

Most of the examples that are included in this post contain no information about how the rhyme is performed. However, my guess is that all of these examples are hand clap rhymes.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT MICHAEL JACKSON
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Jackson
Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958 – June 25, 2009) was an American singer, songwriter, and dancer. Dubbed the "King of Pop", he is regarded as one of the most significant cultural figures of the 20th century and one of the greatest entertainers. Jackson's contributions to music, dance, and fashion, along with his publicized personal life, made him a global figure in popular culture for over four decades.

[...]

The eighth child of the Jackson family, Michael made his professional debut in 1964 with his elder brothers Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, and Marlon as a member of the Jackson 5. He began his solo career in 1971 while at Motown Records, and in the early 1980s, became a dominant figure in popular music. His music videos, including those for "Beat It", "Billie Jean", and "Thriller" from his 1982 album Thriller, are credited with breaking racial barriers and transforming the medium into an art form and promotional tool. Their popularity helped bring the television channel MTV to fame. Bad (1987) was the first album to produce five US Billboard Hot 100 number-one singles."...

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE HAND CLAP RHYMES "COCA COLA WENT TO TOWN" & "MICHAEL JACKSON WENT TO TOWN"
"Coca Cola Went To Town" and its variant form "Michael Jackson Went To Town" are composed using a similar format to what I call "trading rhymes". (Probably the most well known example of a "trading rhyme" is "Hush Little Baby")*. In trading rhymes one item is found to be somehow defective and is traded for another item which itself is found to be defective, and this pattern continues again and again.

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hush,_Little_Baby

In the two rhymes that are the focus of this post, one beverage comes into town only to be beaten up by another beverage. Another beverage either beats up that second beverage or other circumstances cause it to be replaced by yet another beverage. This pattern continues again and again (usually) until the first beverage again becomes the beverage of choice.

"Coca Cola Went To Town" and "Michael Jackson Went To Town" obliquely refer to people's experiences with or perceptions about what has been called "the cola wars" in the United States. Here's information about "the cola wars" from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cola_wars
"The long-time rival soft drink producers The Coca-Cola Company and PepsiCo have engaged mutually-targeted marketing campaigns for the direct competition between each company's product lines, especially their flagship colas, Coca-Cola and Pepsi. Beginning in the late 1970s and into the 1980s, the intensity of these campaigns have led to them, and the competition in general, being known as the cola wars.[1]

[...]

During the peak of the cola wars, as Coca-Cola saw its flagship product losing market share to Pepsi, as well as to Diet Coke and competitors' products, the company considered a change to the beverage's formula and flavor. In April 1985, The Coca-Cola Company introduced its new formula for Coca-Cola, which became popularly known as "New Coke". Consumer backlash to the change led to the company making a strategic retreat on July 11, 1985, announcing its plans to bring back the previous formula under the name "Coca-Cola Classic".[2]"...
-snip-
Some examples of "Coca Cola Went To Town" feature other cola products such as "Diet Pepsi" as the lead cola in that rhyme. Read #5 given below as an example of this.

****
My guess is that examples of "Coca Cola Went To Town" rhymes may have been first chanted in the early 1980s. It's likely that a number of versions of "Coca Cola Went To Town" were composed shortly after 1984 as they obliquely refer to Michael Jackson and his song "Billy Jean". In 1984 pop star Micheal Jackson's hair caught on fire when a fire works exploded while he filmed a Pepsi commercial singing a re-worked version of his hit song "Billy Jean".

Michael Jackson’s superstar status and the fact that he was filming a Pepsi commercial explains why many children started chanting versions of "Coca Cola Went To Town" that used his name instead of that original title. The details about that incident also explain why the girl's name "Billie Jean" (or some folk processed version of that name such as "jelly beans") is a part of many versions of that "Michael Jackson Went To Town" rhyme.

However, the fact that most examples of that rhyme end with a line such as "now we're back to Coke" suggests that those versions of that rhyme weren't composed until 1985 when Coca Cola brought back the original formula for Coke (as per the Wikipedia article quoted above). Read the comment given in this pancocojams' comment section that mentions 1985 as the date that that commenter chanted a "Coca Cola Went To Town" rhyme that includes the name "Michael Jackson."

****
The "Coca Cola Went To Town" (and the "Michael Jackson Went To Town") rhyme can be chanted alone or in combination with other hand clap rhymes, for instance, as part of long versions of the hand clap rhyme "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky". Versions of "Coca Cola Went To Town" that mention Michael Jackson were very likely composed after that pop star's hair caught on fire accident.

It's doubtful that many children who recite/d "Coca Cola Went To Town" or Michael Jackson Went To Town" are/were aware of the background for the words for those rhymes. And it's probably doubtful that a child composed the original "Coca Cola Went To Town" rhyme.

****
EXAMPLES OF THE HAND CLAP RHYME "COCA COLA WENT TO TOWN"
These examples are given in no particular order with their source given after the rhyme. When the "Coca Cola Went To Town" verse is combined with other verses, I'v written it in italics to highlight it. Numbers are added for referencing purposes only.

1. coca cola went to town



MrRigby666, Jul 30, 2011

coca cola went to town
Pepsi cola shot him down
Dr pepper fixed him up
now were drinking 7 up
7 up got the flu
now were drinking mountain dew
mountain dew fell of the mountain
now were drinking cherry fountain
cherry fountain had a stroke
now were back to drinking coke


Comments are turned off
-snip-
*Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/11/my-comments-about-youtubes-policy.html for a pancocojams post on this subject that is entitled "Information & My Comments About YouTube's Policy Enacted February 2019 Which Disallows Comments For Most YouTube Children's Videos".

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2. HOW2 SING Coca Cola | SCOUTADELIC #CampfireSong



Scoutadelic, May 27, 2019

In our #HOW2 Campfire Song series, Tayler & T show us how to sing the repeat after me song, Coca Cola. #CampfireSongs

Lyrics
Coca Cola came to town [repeat]
Diet Pepsi shot him down [repeat]
Dr. Pepper picked him up [repeat]
Now we all drink 7-Up [repeat]

7-Up got knocked down too [repeat]
Now we’re drinking Irn Bru [repeat]
Irn Bru fell down the mountain [repeat]
Now we’re drinking from the fountain [repeat]

Oh no, the fountain broke [repeat]
Now we’ve all gone back to Coke [repeat]
Coca Cola's lost it's fizz [repeat]
Now we all drink Fanta Whizz [repeat]
-snip-
"Coca Cola Came To Town" (as sung in the video example given as #2 below) is sung in call & response pattern and sounds like the military cadence "Sound Off". This version of "Coca Cola Came To Town" has a different tune than the version which is chanted by the two girls in version #1 above. The way the girls chanted this song is the way that I've usually heard it performed online (Note: I've never heard this rhyme during the years that I engaged in face to face collecting of children's rhymes, mostly in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area from 1985 to 2008.) Nevertheless, it's possible that the call & response pattern and military cadence tune was the earliest way this rhyme was chanted.

Also, note that the example of "Coca Cola Came To Town" which is given in this pancocojams comment thread includes the information that the rhyme uses the same tune as "Yankee Doodle Came To Town". That old American song is undoubtedly the inspiration for the first line of "Coca Cola Went [or "Came"] To Town" and "Michael Jackson Came To Town" rhymes.
-snip-
Because this video features two women chanting this rhyme, the video's comment section wasn't affected by the February 28, 2019 YouTube ban on comments for videos featuring children under 13 years of age.

****
3. "We sang it but me and my friend made another part of the song
Coca Cola came to town
Diet Pepsi shot it down
Doctor pepper picked him up
Now we all drink 7up
7up caught the flu
Now we all drink iron bru
Iron bru fell down the mountain
Now we’re drinking from the fountain
Oh no the fountain broke
Now we all drink cherry coke
Cherry coke got in a muddle
Now we’re drinking from a puddle
Oh no the puddle dried up
Now we’re drinking from a cup
Oh no the cup broke
Again we’re back to plain old coke
Plain old coke is so last year
Now we’re drinking ginger beer
Ginger beer needed first aid
Now we’re drinking lemonade
Lemonade had war on sprite
Things are getting really tight
The sink is what we’re drinking from
The sink is running out of water
Our drinking supply is getting shorter
Oh no the sink broke
I guess we’re back to plain old coke"
-Crazy Chix, 2019, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHTs7DJwcqw HOW2 SING Coca Cola | SCOUTADELIC #CampfireSong [video given as #2 above]

****
4. This is how I learnt it:

Coca cola went to town
Pepsi cola shot him down
Dr.pepper fixed him up now we're drinking 7up
7up got the flu
Now we're drinking mountain dew
Mountain dew fell off a mountain
Now we're drinking from a fountain
Fountain broke
People choked
Now we're back to drinking coke!
Lol bye
-Angela Smith, 2019, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHTs7DJwcqw HOW2 SING Coca Cola | SCOUTADELIC #CampfireSong [video given as #2 above]

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5. Down by the river with the hanky bankys
Where the bullfrogs jump from bank to banky
say an
epp
opp
epp
bop
bop
Skittle dittle curly pop
I pledge allegence to the flag
That Micheal jackson makes me gag
Diet Pepsi came to town
Coca-Cola pushed him down
Orange soda picked him up
Now I'm drinking 7 up
7up caught the flu
Now I'm drinking Moutain Dew
Moutain Dew fell off the moutain
Now I'm drinking from a fountian
Foutain Broke
Now I'm drinking plain old Coke

-Guest, July 15, 2007 http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034 "Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky"

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6. "Coca Cola went to town
Diet Pepsi shot him down
Dr. Pepper fixed him up
Now we all drink 7up
7up got the flu
Now we all drink Mountain Dew
Mountain Dew fell down a mountain
Now we drink from a fountain
Fountain broke, people choke,
now we're back to drinking coke"
-Nadia Smalling, Mar 31, 2010, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6Cw-Awwm_M Coca Cola went to town rhyme (lyrics)
-snip-
This video focuses on the sax instrumental music and provides the words but no audio of the rhyme itself. The comment thread for this video remains open (as of November 10, 2019). There are 254 comments to that discussion as of that date at 5:12 PM.

****
7. "Mine is cherry soda went to town orange soda knocked him down doctor peper fixed him up now im drinking 7 up. 7 up had no cafeen now im drinking gas a leen. Gas a leen gave me the flew now im drinking moutain dew. Moutain dew fell off the moutain. Now im drinking from the fountain FINALLY the foutain broke now im drinking plane oh coak!😇✌"
-China Gamer, 2018, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6Cw-Awwm_M Coca Cola went to town rhyme (lyrics)

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8. "thats not how it goes

Coca Cola came to town
Diet Pepsi shot him down

Dr Pepper picked him up
Now we all drink seven up

Seven up caught the flu
now we all drink iron brew

iron brew got split in two
now we all drink Mountain Dew

Mountain Dew fell down a mountain
Now we all drink from a fountain

Oh no, the fountain broke
now we all drink cherry coke

cherry coke was so last year
now we all drink ginger beer

ginger beer got in a muddle
now we all drink from a puddle

Oh no, the puddle dried up
now we all drink from a cup

oh no, the cup broke
now were back to plain old coke"
The Ravagers Of The Lost, 2018, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6Cw-Awwm_M Coca Cola went to town rhyme (lyrics)

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9. "THIS IS MA VERSION!

Coca cola came to town

diet pepsi shot him down

dr pepper fixed him up

now were drinkin 7-Up

7-Up got the flu

now were drinkin mountain dew

mountain dew fell off the mountain

now were drinkin from the fountain

fountain broke had a stroke

now were drinkin cherry coke

cherry coke lost it's cherry

now were drinkin logan berry

logan berry, lost in sea

now were drinkin iced tea

ice tea died and chocked

now were back to drinkin COKE!

TAADAAA!!!
"
THATS MA VERSION!
-Ro M, 2009, https://malaysia.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091002185754AAMGvg7

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10. "coca cola came to town
pepsi cola shot him down
dr. pepper stiched him up
now we all drink 7-up"
-bendergoonie1985, 09/01/05, bendergoonie1985">http://www.inthe00s.com/archive/inthe80s/smf/1109960765.shtml">bendergoonie1985

****
[added November 11, 2019]
11. "I used to sing it:

Down by the river by the hanky panky
where the bull frogs jumped from bank to banky
sayin east side west side east side west side
dilly dang dong!


and i have been trying to figure out the soda song... i know it is like this but i cant remember the end!

pepsi-cola went to town
big red shot 'em down
dr. pepper fix 'em up
now we're drinking 7-up
7-up fell down the mountain
now we're drinking from a fountain
fountain broke, no more coke...

and i know there is more i just don't know what comes after that..?"
-GUEST,Kristen, 18 Feb 10; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034 "Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky"

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Visitor comments are welcome.