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Thursday, June 4, 2020

Miriam Makeba - Hapo Zamani (information, video, lyrics)



Kilimanjaro Sounds, Jun 27, 2013

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides some information about South African singer/activist Miriam Makeba and showcases Makeba's performance of the song "Habo Zamani".

The lyrics of this song are also included in this post along with their English translation.

The content of this post is presented for cultural and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Miriam Makeba for her musical legacy and thanks to all those who are featured in this video. Thanks to the composer of this song and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

***
INFORMATION ABOUT MIRIAM MAKEBA
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miriam_Makeba
"Zenzile Miriam Makeba (4 March 1932 – 9 November 2008), nicknamed Mama Africa, was a South African singer, songwriter, actress, United Nations goodwill ambassador, and civil rights activist. Associated with musical genres including Afropop, jazz, and world music, she was an advocate against apartheid and white-minority government in South Africa.

Born in Johannesburg to Swazi and Xhosa parents, Makeba was forced to find employment as a child after the death of her father. She had a brief and allegedly abusive first marriage at the age of 17, gave birth to her only child in 1950, and survived breast cancer. Her vocal talent had been recognized when she was a child, and she began singing professionally in the 1950s, with the Cuban Brothers, the Manhattan Brothers, and an all-woman group, the Skylarks, performing a mixture of jazz, traditional African melodies, and Western popular music. In 1959, Makeba had a brief role in the anti-apartheid film Come Back, Africa, which brought her international attention, and led to her performing in Venice, London, and New York City. In London, she met the American singer Harry Belafonte, who became a mentor and colleague. She moved to New York City, where she became immediately popular, and recorded her first solo album in 1960. Her attempt to return to South Africa that year for her mother's funeral was prevented by the country's government.

Makeba's career flourished in the United States, and she released several albums and songs, her most popular being "Pata Pata" (1967). Along with Belafonte she received a Grammy Award for her 1965 album An Evening with Belafonte/Makeba. She testified against the South African government at the United Nations and became involved in the civil rights movement. She married Stokely Carmichael, a leader of the Black Panther Party, in 1968. As a result, she lost support among white Americans and faced hostility from the US government, leading her and Carmichael to move to Guinea. She continued to perform, mostly in African countries, including at several independence celebrations. She began to write and perform music more explicitly critical of apartheid; the 1977 song "Soweto Blues", written by her former husband Hugh Masekela, was about the Soweto uprising. After apartheid was dismantled in 1990, Makeba returned to South Africa. She continued recording and performing, including a 1991 album with Nina Simone and Dizzy Gillespie, and appeared in the 1992 film Sarafina!. She was named a UN goodwill ambassador in 1999, and campaigned for humanitarian causes. She died of a heart attack during a 2008 concert in Italy.

Makeba was among the first African musicians to receive worldwide recognition. She brought African music to a Western audience, and popularized the world music and Afropop genres. She also made popular several songs critical of apartheid, and became a symbol of opposition to the system, particularly after her right to return was revoked. Upon her death, former South African President Nelson Mandela said that "her music inspired a powerful sense of hope in all of us."

****
LYRICS - HABO ZAMANI

Hapo zamani, sikuya (sikuwa) hivi
Hapo zamani, shauri ya pombe

Nindibona ndilinxila nje kungenxa yamabhulu
(I am a drunk because of the Afrikaner white man)

Nindibona ndingenakhaya nje kungenxa yabelungu
(I am homeless because of the whites)

Nindibona ndizula nje kungenxa yabelungu
(I am a hobo because of the whites)

Baleka bhulu (Run white man)

Sizobuya (We'll come back)

Sizobuy' ekhaya (we'll come back home)
-snip-
Written By Dorothy Masuka
Arranger: Jerry Ragovoy, Luchi de Jesus, Jimmy Wisner & Severino Dias De Olivera
Release Date: 1967

https://genius.com/Miriam-makeba-ha-po-zamani-lyrics

Wednesday, June 3, 2020

#SayHerName Movement (information and videos)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents information about the #SayHerName movement.

Two videos of the #SayHerName movement are also included in this post.

The Addendum to this post showcases how the #sayhername" chant is changed and used for male victims of police brutality and/or other racist acts that result in the death of Black or Brown males.

The content of this post is presented for socio-cultural and educational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

RIP all females who have lost their lives or have been injured as a result of racism and/or police brutality. Thanks to all those who created or are active in the #SayHerName movement.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT THE #SAYHERNAME MOVEMENT
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SayHerName
"#SayHerName is a social movement that seeks to raise awareness for black female victims of police brutality and anti-black violence in the United States.[1] #SayHerName aims to change the public perception that victims of police brutality and anti-Black violence are predominantly male by highlighting the gender-specific ways in which black women are disproportionately affected by fatal acts of racial injustice.[2] In an effort to create a large social media presence alongside existing racial justice campaigns, such as #BlackLivesMatter and #BlackGirlsMatter, the African American Policy Forum (AAPF) coined the hashtag #SayHerName in February 2015.[2]

[...]

Origins of the movement
Historical context
Black women have been common victims of police brutality for over a century, however, their stories are often left out of the mainstream narrative. The experiences of black women in regard to such brutality is unique to their male counterparts because their experiences often involve sexual assault. Women such as Hattie McCray and the girls of the Leesburg Stockade are mere examples of the police violence black women face. Although the "SayHerName campaign began in 2015, police brutality has been an issue for black women for much longer. [5]

Creation of the campaign
The #SayHerName movement is a response to the Black Lives Matter movement and the mainstream media's tendency to sideline the experiences of black women in the context of police brutality and anti-Black violence.[6][7] In recent years, the killings of unarmed black men like Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown have captured much more national attention and public outrage than the killings of black women such as Rekia Boyd and Shelly Frey.[8][9] According to Kimberlé Crenshaw, one of the founders of the AAPF, black women's continued exclusion from stories about police brutality, racism, and anti-Black violence contribute to an erroneous notion that black men are the chief victims of racism and state-sanctioned violence which underplay issues such as rape and sexual assault by police.[10] #SayHerName does not seek to replace Black Lives Matter or dilute its power, but aims to simply add perspectives and lived experiences to the conversation of racial injustice.

The movement actively considers how multiple social identities (including gender, sexual orientation, and class) influence an individual's experiences with police brutality and anti-Black violence, a concept known as intersectionality.[11]

Name of movement
The name of the movement seems to have two thrusts. It seems to advocate literally saying the names of black women, both among individuals and in the media, who the movement perceives to have been the victims of police violence. And the concept of saying the name is also a symbol or shorthand for learning and telling the stories of these women, again both between individuals and in media. Crenshaw has said, "If you say the name, you’re prompted to learn the story, and if you know the story, then you have a broader sense of all the ways Black bodies are made vulnerable to police violence.”[12]

[...]

#SayHerName as a movement is largely based on the concept of intersectionality in order to bring attention to all victims of systemic violence. Intersectionality is a term that Kimberlé Crenshaw was responsible for coining,[14] its earliest usage being dated to 1989. Since then it has become a key element of many modern feminist practices. Brittany Cooper explains how intersectionality provides an analytical frame originally designed to address the unique positions of women of color within rights movements. Its relevance to #SayHerName is highlighted by Crenshaw's founding position in both the concept of 'intersectionality' and the movement itself. The focus on the victimization of black women within the #SayHerName movement is dependent on the notion of intersectionality, which Kimberlé Crenshaw describes as "like a lazy Susan – you can subject race, sexuality, transgender identity or class to a feminist critique through intersectionality".[15]

Additional factors in an intersectional analysis within #SayHerName include cis or trans status, education, geographical location, and disability[15] – both on the parts of the victims being targeted and the officers responsible for the violence. Kimberlé Crenshaw especially highlights the role of both physical and mental disability as a factor that puts victims more at risk of being targeted as threatening or otherwise violent by police. This is exacerbated by stereotypes of aggressiveness and poor emotional control[15] attributed to black women and men in the United States of America.

Homa Kahleeli asserts that over seventy black women have died as a result of either police violence or police misconduct within the past three years.[15] In instances of police misconduct where firearms are discharged, both female and child victims of murder have been objectified with the label "collateral", which diminishes the violence of murder and erases responsibility of the officer.[15] #SayHerName highlights collateral treatment as a unique form of violence that these victims face in contrast with the black men addressed by the Black Lives Matter movement.

Andrea J. Ritchie argues that in addition to/included within this group of seventy black women is a larger category of people who have been targeted by police violence that #SayHerName addresses. This category includes the high rates of queer and transgender women of color who have been disproportionately targeted. These disparities emerge from gendered norms and stereotypes with roots in slavery and colonialism that have been further contextualized through the war on drugs and the legal debates surrounding LGBTQ rights.[13]

[...]

The [#SayHerName] hashtag is mostly active on Twitter. Of its many uses, the #SayHerName hashtag has principally served to highlight recent incidents of black women's fatal encounters with police and anti-Black violence as well as advertise upcoming events.[18] An analysis of Twitter activity found that a third of Tweets using the hashtag were in conjunction with the name of a black woman who was a victim of police violence.[19] Other content using the hashtag included links to blogs written by black women, such as The Huffington Post's Black Voices column, Blavity, and BlackGirlTragic.com. Second most frequent were academics, particularly black feminist scholars, though the largest number of retweets came from a white male entertainer.[19]”...

****
SHOWCASE VIDEOS:
Video #1: #SayHerName at the Women's March on Washington (AAPF)



African American Policy Forum, Apr 7, 2017

On January 21, 2017, family members of Black women who have been killed by the police participated in the Women's March on Washington alongside AAPF, 1 Billion Rising and more. Listen to their stories and #SayHerName. "For so long we as women were not allowed to have anything to do with battle, protecting our communities, protecting our country - we didn't have a voice. I refuse. I refuse as a woman, I refuse as a Black woman, I refuse as a human to shut up any longer. I'm not just a soldier for India Beaty, I'm a solider for every one of our children who has been unjustifiably taken away from us." -Vicki McAdory, Auntie-Mama of India Beaty

****
Video #2: Four Years of #SayHerName



African American Policy Forum, Dec 13, 2018

December 14th, 2018 marks the fourth anniversary of the #SayHerName campaign, a movement launched by AAPF to raise awareness of Black women, girls and femmes impacted by police violence. Over the past four years, it has grown into a global call to uplift the stories of Black women, girls and femmes who have been victimized by state violence, and to demand justice for them and their families.

The video highlights the campaign and some of the remarkable women who form the Say Her Name Mothers Network, a group of mothers who have lost their daughters to police violence. Since its first convening in 2015, the Say Her Name Mothers Network has joined together with AAPF on a number of occasions, marching together at the Women’s March in 2017, lobbying for police reform on Capitol Hill, and joining together in several focus groups and planning sessions to strategize around the initiative and to assess the needs of new family members who have lost their daughters to police violence.

On this anniversary, we reiterate the urgency of fighting for a gender-inclusive narrative in the movement for Black lives and broader social justice reform.

Learn more about the campaign by visiting our website (aapf.org) and social media pages (@aapolicyforum)
#SayHerName at the Women's March on Washington (AAPF)

****
ADDENDUM -See scenes from Sacramento's Black Lives Matter protest over George Floyd police death



Sacramento Bee, May 30, 2020
-snip-
Notice in this video that "No Justice No Peace" is chanted in a call & response pattern-
a caller chants "No justice" and the other marchers respond "No peace." "No justice, No peace" has also been chanted in unison.

Notice also that "Say his name" is also chanted in a call & response pattern- a caller chants "say his name" (or "say her name") and the other marchers respond with the name of the latest victim who lost his or her life as a result of police brutality or racist actions. In this embedded video, the group chants the name "George Floyd".

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Monday, June 1, 2020

Comments About Igbo Culture From The YouTube Discussion Thread For Jidenna - "Chief Don't Run"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part pancocojams series on Nigerian American rapper Jideena's song/video "Chief Don't Run". Part II showcases the official video of "Chief Don't Run".

Part II also provides some information about Igbos and presents some of the comments from that video's discussion thread which refer to Igbo (Nigerian) culture or are from Igbo people or are from other people from the continent of Africa.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2020/06/jidenna-chief-dont-run-information.html for Part I of this series. Part I provides information about Jideena and showcases the official YouTube video of his 2016 song "Chief Don't Run". The lyrics for that track are also included in this post.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Jideena for his musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are associated with this showcase video and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post. Thanks also to the publisher of this video on YouTube.
-snip-
WARNING: Some scenes from Jideena's official 2016 video "Chief Don't Run" show Jideena and another Black man being arrested by the police. These scenes are very similar to the tragic deaths of Eric Garner and George Floyd. Consequently, these scenes may trigger some viewers.

RIP to Eric Garner, George Floyd, Breoona Taylor, and all others who have dead as a result of police brutality.

****
SOME INFORMATION ABOUT IGBOS
Excerpt #1
"The Igbo people ... also spelled Ibo[7][8] and formerly also Iboe, Ebo, Eboe,[9] Eboans,[10] Heebo;[11] natively Ṇ́dị́ Ìgbò [ìɡ͡bò]... are an ethnic group native to the present-day south-central and southeastern Nigeria...[12] Geographically, the Igbo homeland is divided into two unequal sections by the Niger River – an eastern (which is the larger of the two) and a western section.[13][14] The Igbo people are one of the largest ethnic groups in Africa.[15]

[...]

Before British colonial rule in the 20th century, the Igbo were a politically fragmented group, with a number of centralized chiefdoms such as Nri, Aro Confederacy, Agbor and Onitsha.[19] Frederick Lugard introduced the Eze system of "Warrant Chiefs".[20] Unaffected by the Fulani War and the resulting spread of Islam in Nigeria in the 19th century, they became overwhelmingly Christian under colonization. In the wake of decolonisation, the Igbo developed a strong sense of ethnic identity.[18] During the Nigerian Civil War of 1967–1970 the Igbo territories seceded as the short-lived Republic of Biafra.[21] MASSOB, a sectarian organization formed in 1999, continues a non-violent struggle for an independent Igbo state.[22]

Large ethnic Igbo populations are found in Cameroon[23] Gabon and Equatorial Guinea,[24] as well as outside Africa."...

****
Excerpt #2
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Igbo_culture
"Igbo culture ([1]Igbo: Ọmenala ndị Igbo) are the customs, practices and traditions of the Igbo people[1] of southeastern[2] Nigeria. It comprises archaic practices as well as new concepts added into the Igbo culture either by cultural evolution or by outside influence. These customs and traditions include the Igbo people's visual art, music and dance forms, as well as their attire, cuisine and language dialects.[3] Because of their various subgroups, the variety of their culture is heightened further.

[...]

Yam
The yam is very important to the Igbo as it is their staple crop. There are celebrations such as the New yam festival (Igbo: Iri Ji) which are held for the harvesting of the yam.[12]

The New Yam festival (Igbo: Iri ji) is celebrated annually to secure a good harvest of the staple crop. The festival is practiced primarily in Nigeria and other countries in West Africa.[13]

[...]

Chieftaincy Title
Main article: Nze na Ozo

An Igbo man with Ichi marks, a sign of rank as an Ozo[17]
Highly accomplished men and women are admitted into their noble orders for people of title such as Ndi Ozo or Ndi Nze. These people receive insignia to show their stature. Membership is highly exclusive, and to qualify an individual need to be highly regarded and well-spoken of in the community."...

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: Jidenna - Chief Don't Run



Jideena, Aug 18, 2016

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS VIDEO'S DISCUSSION THREAD
(with numbers added for referencing purposes only. I've added some brief quotes and/or explanatory notes for some of these comments. Notice that the screen names of some of these commenters have changed.

2016
1. Ngeri Nnachi
"Wow, this is so artistically fruitful. The imagery and narratives are incredibly insightful. I love this movement. Thank you for this contribution to our collective identity Jidenna! Thank you for repping us well well. #Naijaproud #IgboAmaka"

**
2. Elizabeth osondu
"he still represents the Igbo tribe he never withholds where he came from Nigerian American"

**
3. Nayy Barbiee
"Love that he embraces his African culture"

**
REPLY
4. The Elite, 2017
"Yeah respect to him, I hate how some American African people (especially most rappers) disregard their African roots and culture and made their culture of gangs, drugs and guns. You don't see American East Asian, American South Asian, American Hispanic, etc disregard their roots and culture. I'm glad African British people embrace their African roots and culture compared to African Americans"

**
REPLY
5. Widg3t's Widgets
"Naomi Amu what the actual f--king f—k* are you talking about? dude is straight American. nothing but."
-snip-
*This word is fully spelled out in this comment.

**
REPLY
6. Nayy Barbiee
"He's Nigerian too so do your research before you come in here with some nonsense."

**
REPLY
7. Tas D. Amour
"His daddy is Nigerian!!! He spent years in Nigeria! Check it out!!!"

**
REPLY
8. Kaneng Botsha
"Naomi Amu he is not just embracing his African culture ...he is mixing the two cultures...he is more than one personality"

**
REPLY
9. Giulia's Mode, 2017
"I love that embraces both sides of his existence, in reference to depicting his mother as caucasian and also representing his African culture. I appreciate it more when people recognize both sides of who they are....its true to the self. Amen to that !"

**
10. Simz
"Song should be called Igwe dont run"

**
REPLY
11. doe nil
"u ryt bro"

**
REPLY
12. OCHI VICTOR
"lol"

**
REPLY
13. Fed up
"Igbo Kwenu"
-snip-
From http://www.bookdrum.com/books/things-fall-apart/1657/bookmark/184718.html by brpsaplit
"The Ibo people have a culture to which community, solidarity, and unity are important. Their phrase “Igbo kwenu” most literally means, “We the Ibo people stand together in agreement and collective will.” It is also a shortened form of a longer phrase, “Igbo kwere na ihe ha kwuru” which means roughly, “The Igbo believe in what they have agreed upon to think, say, and do."
-snip-
Click in http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/10/excerpts-of-articles-that-explain-what.html for more information about and examples of the saying "Igbo Kwenu".

**
REPLY
14. JAY HAWT!!
"exactly nwanne!"
-snip-
Google translate from Igbo to English- "nwanne" = "brother"

**
REPLY
15. Daniel Bergin
"Igwe don't run cause he's just there 😂

**
REPLY
16. Lisa Scott
"Doreen Selly Igwe is King in Igbo language....that's why."

**
REPLY
17. coldlightning14, 2017
"very few people will get this"

**
REPLY
18. Emmanuella Engee, 2017
"in Igbo culture, the Igwe answers to his Chiefs. The Chiefs are the Kingmakers."

**
19. Vision
"good stuff jiddena making Igbo Nigerians all over proud"

**
20. *ThinkFarther*
"The chief thing is not just an Igbo custom Ifeanyi. In Cameroon we also have chiefs and even friends I have from Kenya and other countries have chief systems established in their villages."

**
REPLY
21. OCHI VICTOR
"+ThinkFarther you're right. I guess he is just being specific here."

**
REPLY
22. Dual Purpose
"@*ThinkFarther* I know but I'm being specific as us igbos wear the red hate you've seen Jidenna wear along with having the cane"

**
REPLY
23. TheSupineSmokey13
"And I know your aware the Yoruba refer to them as Oloye"

**
REPLY
24. Dual Purpose
"@TheSupinesmokey13 I know Yorouba people gave chiefs too...I just didn't know the name lol"

**
REPLY
25. Dual Purpose
"@AIRG01 I know about the moors you just lack the knowledge of igbos culture. Bro I'm from Nigeria and I've lived there. He's definitely doing that as Igbo himself. The moors had a few with a tassel smh. Why do dudes assume you don't know what you talking bout when they clearly have no clue what they ate talking about themselves"
-snip-
This comment appears to be in response to one comparing the Igbo fitted cap to a fez. However, that comment doesn't appear to be available anymore.

**
REPLY
26. OCHI VICTOR
"@Ifeanyi Morka Do they know that you also an Igbo man just like Jidenna? Hey Ify, my middle name is also Ifeanyichukwu. Great to meet brothers here. African cultures are similar but not the same."

**
27. Azizi Powell, 2020
"@Dual Purpose, three years later, but here's so information that explains your comment about Igbos and red hats.
From https://newafrikan77.wordpress.com/2018/02/07/the-truth-behind-the-igbo-red-cap-red-ozo-ichie-okpu-ogbuefis-opu-meaning-and-sacred-tradition/ "The Truth Behind The Igbo Red Cap ( Red Ozo , Ichie Okpu, Ogbuefis, Opu ) Meaning And Sacred Tradition" Posted by Newafrikan77Feb 2018
"In Igboland the red is for chiefs, while ordinary person can wear black, brown, green or white.” It is often called the Red Ozo or Ichie Okpu….

The ‘red cap’ worn by chiefs in Igboland symbolizes authority, tradition, and culture; and it also represents the entire institution of leadership, authority, and power in Igbo culture….

Putting on the red cap is not an all-comers affair in Igboland as there are always a select number of individuals who are entitled to wear this special cap (especially with eagle feather which in its own right signifies prominence)."

I quoted in this in a post in my cultural blog https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/11/fila-red-ozos-kufis-and-some-other.html/

That quote doesn't mention carrying a cane, but that was/is also an Igbo custom signifying status if not authority. Carrying a cane was probably a custom that was lifted from White people, but the red cap wasn't.

**
28. Aderinsola Adesida
"Sooo Jidenna when are you bringing the palm wine to my father's house?"

**
REPLY
29. Oluwaseun Adeniyi
"Hahhahahaha. And the Yams right????"

**
REPLY
30. britt harmony
"Lol :)"

**
REPLY
31. t33mc
"Chei!! The thirst is real in these streets tho. lol"

**
REPLY
32. Aderinsola Adesida
"@t33mc Abeg leave me. I'm schooling in Missouri; I can't find my Naija boys here😭"

**
REPLY
33. t33mc
"Naija boys are overrated, oyinbo is the way to go, better yet a mix of both... oh wow, I think I just went full circle and recommended Jidena, lol"

**
REPLY
34. Aderinsola Adesida
"@t33mc 😅. You can't get away from that Naija chocolate, eh? 😋😉"

**
REPLY
35. t33mc
"I am a guy oh, so as long as the Naija chocolate is packaged in a dress (minus Jenna and his/her ppl) I am down to sample. But yes, ain't nothing like a Naija girl."

**
REPLY
36. Aderinsola Adesida
"@t33mc No worries, I feel you."

**
REPLY
37. gilo
"Rofl... palm wine ffs, bring some gardening work"

**
REPLY
38. Claris Besong
"Chaaaa only Palm wine?? What about the goats, fufu, and yam?"

**
REPLY
39. gilo
"Fried plantin, rum and coke, a great girl and some gardening work.... Paradise- for a bit"

**
REPLY
40. Loreen Gwion
"When he brings the palm wine give me some oo..I beg"

**
REPLY
41. Aderinsola Adesida
"@Reen N I know right? Palm wine is life 😍"

****
2017
42. TOCHUKWU Mboma
"Mehnnn..
This dude is so cultural..

He reps Igbo , Nigeria and the Entire Africa..

I don't believe an igbo could go back to roots. Wowww!

Thank God it's Amazing!!!
⭐️"

**
43. elle marie
"Omg the african tribute almost made me cry yassss jidenna"

**
44. Onyii Ilo
"He knows who he is. He is an Igbo chief.
The title of this song in Igbo:
"Ichie adighi agba oso" "

**
REPLY
45. Iloh chifomma
"Gbam!!"
-snip-
Google translate from Igbo to English is "mine!", but I'm guessing that "gbam" has another colloquial meaning.

****
2018
46. Chiamaka E
"Jidenna my baby keep representing 🇳🇬 Nigeria. Igbo kwenu!! Long live the Chief!
P.S abu m lolo gi. Nani m😘"

**
47. Drumminz22
"igbo man reppin... been dat deal since he came out #salute"

**
49. Ebizzill
"when the african ancestors are coming back about to tack full force. Ge ready y'all."

****
2019
50. ashley peek
"When I was in Ethiopia they would play this song like 25 times a day on tv."

****
2020
51, Oduwa Richard
"I salute you my high chief.. 9ja is proud of u"

****
This concludes Part II of this two part pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Jidenna - Chief Don't Run (information, video, & lyrics)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a two part pancocojams series on Nigerian American Hip Hop artist Jideena's 2016 Hip Hop track "Chief Don't Run".

Part I provides information about Jideena and showcases the official YouTube video of his 2016 song "Chief Don't Run". The lyrics for that track are also included in this post.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2020/06/comments-about-igbo-culture-from.html for Part II of this pancocojams series. Part II showcases the official video of "Chief Don't Run". Part II also provides some information about Igbos and presents some of the comments from that video's discussion thread which refer to Igbo (Nigerian) culture or are from Igbo people or are from other people from the continent of Africa.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Jideena for his musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are associated with this showcase video and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post. Thanks also to the publisher of this video on YouTube.
-snip-
WARNING: Some scenes from Jideena's official 2016 video "Chief Don't Run" show Jideena and another Black man being arrested by the police. These scenes are very similar to the tragic deaths of Eric Garner and George Floyd. Consequently, these scenes may trigger some viewers.

RIP to Eric Garner, George Floyd and all others who have dead as a result of police brutality.

**
WARNING - Jideena's "Chief Don't Run" includes a form of what is commonly known as "the n word". Because pancocojams is a family friendly blog, I've used a modified spelling of that referent in the lyric section.

****
Jidenna - Chief Don't Run



Jidenna, Aug 18, 2016
-snip-
Statistics as of June 1, 2020 at 1:58 AM EDT
Total # of views- 14,467,057
Total # of likes- 135K
Total # of dislikes - 4.9K
Total # of comments -5,231

****
INFORMATION ABOUT JIDEENA
Excerpt #1:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jidenna
Jidenna Theodore Mobisson (born May 4, 1985), better known mononymously as Jidenna, is a Nigerian-American rapper, singer, songwriter and record producer.[2][3] In 2015, Jidenna released two singles, "Classic Man" and "Yoga", promoting Janelle Monáe's label Wondaland Records' compilation EP The Eephus with Epic Records.[4] His debut album, The Chief was released on February 17, 2017 and peaked at number 38 on the Billboard 200.[5]

Early life and education
Jidenna Theodore Mobisson was born on May 4, 1985 in Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin,[6][7] to Tama Mobisson, a Caucasian accountant, and Oliver Mobisson, a Nigerian Igbo academic. Jidenna grew up partially in Nigeria, where his father was working as a professor of computer science at Enugu State University.[3] When Jidenna was 6 years old, the family moved back to the United States.[3] In 1995, the family moved to Norwood, Massachusetts, and then to Milton, Massachusetts, in 2000.[8] His father died in 2010.[3]"...

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Excerpt #2
From https://www.allmusic.com/artist/jidenna-mn0003397779/biography
Artist Biography by Andy Kellman
"A sharp dresser, singer, and rapper with geographic connections ranging from Nigeria to U.S. cities like Oakland, Atlanta, and New York, Jidenna Mobisson arrived in 2015 with a hybrid R&B/rap sound he called swank. The son of pioneering Nigerian scientist and educator Oliver Mobisson, he cited Nat King Cole, James Brown, and OutKast among his many inspirations. The Stanford graduate signed to Janelle Monáe's Wondaland label and debuted with "Classic Man," where he delivered boastful, foul-mouthed rhymes and a neat vocal hook over a sparse, street-level beat. Released in February 2015, the single took a while to gain traction, possibly receiving a nudge from Monáe's March-issued "Yoga" (which featured her new signing) and reached the Billboard Hot 100 three months later. It eventually went double platinum.

The Eephus, a six-track showcase for the Wondaland crew, was released in August 2015 with the original "Classic Man" and a version featuring Kendrick Lamar. Mobisson gained further exposure performing his song "Long Live the Chief" on a season one episode of the Netflix Marvel series Luke Cage in 2016. A Grammy nomination for "Classic Man" and several stylistically varied singles, including "Little Bit More," "The Let Out," and "Bambi," led to the February 2017 release of The Chief, Mobisson's first album. The well-received album debuted at number 38 on the Billboard 200 and peaked at number 16 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart. July 2019 saw Mobisson issue the singles "Tribe" and "Sufi Woman" ahead of the release of his sophomore full-length effort 85 to Africa, which arrived later that August."

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Excerpt #3
From https://www.npr.org/2017/03/23/521079614/jidenna-on-what-it-means-to-be-the-chief
Jidenna On What It Means To Be 'The Chief'; by Christina Cala, March 23, 2017
"The 2015 hit "Classic Man" introduced the world to Jidenna. His look matched his sound: three-piece suits, polka-dotted ascots and red hair slicked down in a wave that would've made Nat King Cole jealous. At one point, a friend's manager took him aside and said he thought Jidenna had a ton of potential as an artist — but there was just one problem.

"He said, 'You're too perfect,' " Jidenna says. "And man, that stuck with me."

So for his first full-length album, the singer and rapper found himself drawn back to his roots: Nigerian highlife singers and the story of his father, who passed away seven years ago.

With his Nigerian dad and Bostonian mother, Jidenna spent his childhood moving across cities, continents and boundaries. Now, he's released his debut album, The Chief.

"The chief is really my father and my grandfather," he explains. "It's also my highest self — the best parts of them in me."...

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Excerpt #4
https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/jidenna-the-remarkable-rise-and-grand-visions-of-a-classic-man-113548/
..."In February [2017], he [Jideena] finally dropped The Chief, a debut album that more than justifies his confidence. Standouts range from the Nineties-style banger “Long Live the Chief” – which went is-that-really-the-“Classic Man”-dude? viral last year after Jidenna performed it on an episode of Netflix’s Luke Cage – to the Magic City–ready “The Let Out” (with Quavo of Migos), all the way to the gorgeous single “Bambi” (it’s Sam Cooke meets the Wailers with trap high-hats, and it’s 2017’s best song so far)."...
-snip-
Although I didn't note the source, I remember reading somewhere that Jideena's father was an Igbo chief. However, "Chief" is only one of Jideena's nicknames, Another nickname for Jideena is "Classic man", a reference to his hit track with that name and also to his fashion style in 2015. By 2019, if not sooner, Jideena changed his looks as evident in his video for his track "Sufi Woman" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7_Yg2BHVpU.

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LYRICS -CHIEF DON'T RUN

[Intro]
Olualuweaway
Uweaway
No the chief don't run
The chief don't
No the chief don't run

[Hook]
Oh the chief don't run
Oh the chief don't run
Oh the chief don't run
Oh the chief don't run

[Verse 1]
Before the red cups and the backwoods smoke
Me and mom in the shack in the woods, bro
I was sleepin' on the floor with the oven door open
While I dreamt about the places that I would go
We would go door to door to door all day
We were begging 'em to lay up in the foyer
I was sittin' with the hookers in a motel hallway
Waiting onna blind audition like it's Broadway
Now these Madams looking like a fleet of foxes
Rat Pack chief of staff like Sinatra
Eat, drink, swank, ni--a* that's the mantra
Betta stand when I speak, ni--a*, fix your posture
Chief don't run, baby, word to poppa
Wanted me to-be-a lawyer, engineer or doctor
The new Godfather, keep your old mobsters
Matter fact, you can keep your old Oscars
It's tomorrow never dies now
I'm on yacht with a prince in Dubai now
I'm with the Dalai Lama's homies in the sky lounge
Cocktails got me loosenin' my tie now
They say a prophet never honored in his homeland
That's fine, I'd rather have my own land
Gotta plan for a hundred Roman numerals
Long live the chief, ni--a, welcome to your funeral

[Hook]
Oh the chief don't run
Oh the chief don't run
Oh the chief don't run
Oh the chief don't run

[Verse 2]
It's my time, hit the gong out here
They gon' need to build a bigger wall out here
I live a different set of laws out here
Know my rights even when I'm in the wrong out here
Look what we did with one song out here
Like a locksmith opened every door out here
Ya dealing with a king, not a kong out here
You a pawn, but we can get along out here
You in my house actin' too free though
We know you foul—ni--a, two free throws
Chiefy, chiefy in a new chief cloak
I ain't even said a word, but my suit bespoke
I got a new agenda that gotta carry through
When your father's enemies are tryna bury you
And the royal families are tryna marry you
Long live the chief, ni--a
Welcome to your burial

[Hook]
Oh the chief don't run
Oh the chief don't run
Oh the chief don't run
Oh the chief don't run

[Post-Hook]
Everybody wanna run, they don't want it like us
Paid my dues, but they still tryna Wesley Snipe-us
Tell me why we gon' still win tonight
Breakin' bread, we got everybody right


Source-https://genius.com/Jidenna-chief-dont-run-lyrics
-snip-
*This form of the "n word" is fully spelled out in these lyrics.

Among the information about this song that is found on that genius.com page is that "Chief Don't Run" was written by the following people:
Spree Wilson, Mark Williams, Milan Wiley, Nana Kwabena, Roman GianArthur, Nate “Rocket” Wonder, Andrew Horowitz, Leslie Gray, Raul Cubina, Nana Afriyie & Jidenna.
-snip-
The beginning word "Olualuweaway" is quite similar to the Yoruba (Nigeria) Orisha "Babalu-Aye"
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babal%C3%BA-Ay%C3%A9
Babalú-Ayé , (also Omolu, Obaluaye, or Obaluaê) (Yoruba: Ọbalúayé, lit. 'Father, Lord of the Earth'[1]) is an Orisha strongly associated with infectious disease and healing in the Yoruba religion, including the body, wealth, and physical possessions. In West Africa, he was strongly associated with epidemics of smallpox, leprosy, influenza, ebola, and HIV/AIDS.[2] Although strongly associated with illness and disease, Babalú-Ayé is also the spirit that cures these ailments. Both feared and loved, Babalú-Ayé is sometimes referred to as the “Wrath of the supreme god” because he punishes people for their transgressions.[3] People hold Babalú-Ayé in great respect and avoid calling his actual name, because they do not wish to invoke epidemics.[4].

Yoruba
Venerated by the Yoruba, O̩balúayé is usually called Sopona (Shopona) and said to have dominion over the Earth and smallpox. He demands respect and even gratitude when he claims a victim, and so people sometimes honor him with the praise name Alápa-dúpé, meaning “One who kills and is thanked for it"...
-snip-
If this Orisha is suggested by the beginning word Olualuweaway in Jideena's song "Chief Don't Run", that name may have been evoked to represent how "bad" (worthy to be feared and respected) this Chief is.

Alternatively, the word "Olualuweaway" may (also) have been coined to represent the Yoruba Orisha "Oluwu". which is another name for Olorun, the most powerful Orisha and leader of the Yoruba pantheon.
From https://www.godsmonsters.com/Game/Divine/3/8/
"Olorun, Oba-Orun, Olodumare, Orisha-Oke, Eleda, Oluwa, Orisa Nla
Sobriquets: Owner of the Sky, King of the Sky, Owner of Endless Space, Creator"...

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