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Friday, September 19, 2014

Words For Father & Mother In Various African Languages (M-Z)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part series that provides an alphabetized listing of a small number of African languages and their word/s for "father" and "mother".

Part II provides entries for African languages from M-Z.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/09/words-for-father-mother-in-various.html Part I of the list. Part I includes entries for African languages from A-L.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

Additions and corrections are very welcome.

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WORDS FOR FATHER AND MOTHER in VARIOUS AFRICAN LANGUAGES, Part I
This small number of languages were selected somewhat at random from this listing of African language names http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/african_languages.htm "Official and Spoken Languages of African Countries" That website indicates that "Africa is a continent with a very high linguistic diversity, there are an estimated 1500-2000 African languages."

In this list, the nation in which the featured language is spoken is given in brackets after the language's name. The African word/s for the English language words "father" and "mother" are then given, followed by a citation of the online source where I retrieved that information. A quote from that source, or from Wikipedia, and/or from some other website may also be included for that entry.

M, N
Mandinka (also given as Manding) [Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea-Bissau and Chad;]
Father = baaba
Mother - naa
http://www.africanculture.dk/gambia/ftp/mandinka.pdf
-snip-
That dictionary also indicates that "mama" and "mamoo" means grandparent; "mamakee" means grandfather and "mamamusoo" means "grandmother".

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O, P
Oshiwambo (Namibia and Angola)
Father = Tate
Mother: Meme
-snip-
Citation for "Tate" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovambo_language
Citation for "Meme" https://worldpulse.com/node/2016 from comment written On January 27, 2010 by justina She also wrote "Grandmother is called Kuku."

Here's a quote from that Wikipedia page for Oshiwambo:
"Not to be confused with Ambo language (Zambia) or Ambo language (Nigeria). ... The language is generally called Ovambo, Ambo, or Oshiwambo in English. ..Ovambo, also known as Wambo or Ambo, is a dialect cluster in Angola and northern Namibia".

Here's more informaton from "Hai ti! – A Beginner's Guide to Oshikwanyama - wingolog" http://wingolog.org/pub/hai-ti/hai-ti.pdf
Ovaneumbo / Edimo:
My father Tate
Your father Xo
His/her father Xe
My mother Meme
Your mother Nyoko

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Q, R

S,T
Sethoso [South Africa]
Father – ntate
Mother - 'me
http://www.sesotho.web.za/greetlse.htm

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Setswana [Botswana, South Africa and Namibia (Southern Africa)]
father - ntate
Mother – mma
http://www.wordgumbo.com/nk/tsw/erengtsw.htm
-snip-
Here's a comment about the pronunciation of "mma" from https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090203213954AA0bMzk "How do you say mother in Setswana?"
“It's "mma". And be sure to lengthen the "m". The "m" sound is long, and the "a" sound is short.”

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Sheng [Kenya]
Dad (father) = mdosi, fathe, mbuyu, buda
Mum (mother) = masa, mathe, mnyaka, mokoro, moda
-snip-
Here's some information about "Sheng" from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheng_slang
"Sheng is a Swahili-based cant, perhaps a mixed language or creole, originating among the urban underclass of Nairobi, Kenya, and influenced by many of the languages spoken there. While primarily a language of urban youths, it has spread across social classes and geographically to neighbouring Tanzania and Uganda…
The word "Sheng" is coined from the two languages that it is mainly derived from: Swahili and English. The "h" was included from the middle of "Swahili because "Seng" would have sounded unusual...

Although the grammar, syntax, and much of the vocabulary are drawn from Swahili, Sheng borrows from English and from the languages of various ethnic groups in Kenya, including Luhya, Gĩkũyũ, Luo and Kamba. Words are also borrowed from languages that are neither a local language nor English – such as the Sheng word dame "lady" — which is a title of honour for a lady in English, or morgen "morning" – a Sheng word used in some areas with a similar meaning in German.

Sheng vocabulary can vary significantly within Kenya's various subdivisions and the larger African Great Lakes region, and even between neighbourhoods in Nairobi”...

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Somali [Somalia]
Father - hooyo
Mother - aabbo
citation: Google translate

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Tigrinya -[Eritrea and Ethiopia]
Father = Abo
Mother -Ade
http://www.digob.com/Tigrinya-eritrea-ethiopia/Tigrinya-Dictionary-eritrea-ethiopia.php

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Twi [Ghana]
Father - Agya
Mother - Ɛna
http://www.nkyea.com/2010/10/twi-language-who-makes-up-your-family/
-snip-
That source also indicated that "Nana" is the Twi word for "Grandfather / Grandmother". Nana is also a Ghanaian title.
"Amongst the Akan clans of Ghana, the word Nana generally denotes social eminence derived from either nobility or advanced age. It is most often used as a pre-nominal honorific by individuals who are entitled to it due to the former of the two ( E.g. kings and chieftains such as Otumfuo Nana Osei Tutu II, the reigning Asantehene of Asanteman)". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nana_(title)
-snip-
Here are two other citations for the Twi word for father and mother (and grandparents):
From http://ghanamagazine.com/twidictionary/
Father – Papa
Mother – Maame
Grandparents – Nana

**
From http://www.interpals.net/note.php?nid=99757 "My African language short phrase book"
Twi (pronounced 'chwee')
Father = papa
Mother = maame

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W, X
Wolof [Senegal, The Gambia, and Mauritania]
Father – Baye
Mother - Yaye
http://livingroutes.goabroad.net/Anastasia!/journals/2711/mini-introduction-to-wolof-as-well-as-orientation-to-senegalese-politics

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Xhosa [South Africa]
Father – tata
Mother - mama
http://chelsea-riley.tumblr.com/Xhosa

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Y, Z
Yoruba [Nigeria]
Father baba
Mother - iya
citation: Google Translate

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Zulu [South Africa]
Father: ubaba
Mother:. umame
Citation: Google Tranlate

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This concludes Part II of this series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Words For Father & Mother In Various African Languages (A-L)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a two part series that provides an alphabetized listing of a small number of African languages and their word/s for "father" and "mother".

Part I provides entries for African languages from A-L.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/09/words-for-father-and-mother-in-various.html for Part II. Part II provide entries for languages from M-Z.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

Additions and corrections are very welcome.

****
WORDS FOR FATHER AND MOTHER in VARIOUS AFRICAN LANGUAGES, Part I
This small number of languages were selected somewhat at random from this listing of African language names http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/african_languages.htm "Official and Spoken Languages of African Countries" That website indicates that "Africa is a continent with a very high linguistic diversity, there are an estimated 1500-2000 African languages."

In this list, the nation in which the featured language is spoken is given in brackets after the language's name. The African word/s for the English language words "father" and "mother" are then given, followed by a citation of the online source where I retrieved that information. A quote from that source, or from Wikipedia, and/or from some other website may also be included for that entry.

A, B
Acholi [Uganda, Sudan]
Father, baba.
Mother, mama
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk%3AAcholi_language
-snip-
"The Acholi language is a Western Nilotic language, classified as Luo (or Lwo). It is mutually intelligible with Lango, Alur and other Luo languages" [Wikipedia page for "Acholi"]

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Amharic [Ethiopia]
Dad = abaye, abate, ababi
Mom = emaye a
http://www.answers.com/Q/How_do_you_say_dad_in_amharic

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Arabic [North Africa, parts of East Africa]
Father - ab
My Dad - abbi

Mother -umm
My Mom - ummi
https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080306202640AATTuqA "Arabic word for mom and dad?" (combined answers)

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C, D
Chichewa [Malawi]
father --- bambo
mother --- mayi
http://malawi.tripod.com/chichewa.html

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E, F
Fula (Gambia)
Father (also a respectful term of address to others) = ba : baaji
Father(s) = baaba; baabaaji
My father = ba am

Mother() = inna; innaaji
My mother = inna am
http://www.smcm.edu/gambia/documents/publications/gamble/Gamble%2012.pdf

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Fulani [Nigeria]
"Baaba (father, we say baabiraaɓe in plural)
Neene or inna or Yumma (mother, the plural is said neeniraaɓe and inniraaɓe"
https://www.facebook.com/fulanitube/posts/361159487312584 “Today we are going to study the Fulani family Fulfulde”

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G,H
Hausa [Nigeria, Niger]
father - uba
mother- uwa
http://archive.org/stream/grammarofhausala00migeiala/grammarofhausala00migeiala_djvu.txt

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I, J
Igbo [Nigeria]
Mother –nne
Father - nna
citation: Google translate

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K, L
Kikongo – [Democratic Republic of the Congo]
Father = papá , poppa
Mother = mama, mamá
http://www.kupsala.net/risto/kongo/kituba-english.html

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Kikuyu – [Kenya]
“Ithe, (plural) ma-ithe – father
This is an interesting word because it translates as ‘their father.’ You use it when you are referring to other peoples’ father. You never use it when you are referring to your own father, in which case you will say ‘Baba.’

Nyina, (Plural) Manyina – mother
Like ‘Ithe’ this word translates as ‘their mother’. When you are referring to your own mother you use the word ‘Maitũ.’”
http://emmanuelkariuki.hubpages.com/hub/The-Kikuyu-Language

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Kirundi [Burundi]
adopted father
umu-rezi

father
(my, our) dāta, dāwe
(your) so
(his, her, their) se
(~-in-law) sebukwe
(~ of twins) sebabiri

Mother
mother
(dearly loved) māma w'umukōndo
(my, our) māma, māwe
(your) nyōko (sometimes with negative implication)
(his, her, their) nyina
http://amajambo.ijuru.com/

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KiSwahili (also known as Swahili) [Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda]
father = baba
Mother = mama
-snip-
Read the comment in the entry on Luo below, and also read the entry about Sheng in Part II.

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Lingala (Democratic Republic of the Congo)
dad, father = papá, -
mama, noun, pl. bamama = mom, mother, Mrs.
http://dic.lingala.be/en/tag/family

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Luganda [Uganda]
Father = Taata
Mother = Maama
http://www.joaoleitao.com/travel/uganda/learn-luganda-language/ "Easy Luganda language"

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Luo (Dholuo) [Kenya, Uganda, South Sudan]
"Father, baba (ABO says, wuoro. Baba is Kiswahili.)
Mother, mama (ABO says, dhako or miyo as well. Mama is Kiswahili.)
http://economics.ozier.com/language/dholuo.html "Luo (Dholuo) Phrases and Basics"
-snip-
I’m not sure what "ABO" means in this quote. I wondered if "ABO" meant the words that Luos used for "mother" and "father" before that language was influenced by Swahili. I decided to look up what Wikipedia said the Luo words for "mother" and "father" are. Here's the information from that site:
Father wuor [Dinka] wur
Mother min [Dinka] mor
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dholuo_language

Here's a comment that I found by googling this subject:
https://worldpulse.com/node/2016 "How do I say mother or grandmother in your language?
by Jennifer Ruwart | May 17, 2008 at 9:51 PM

"On May 17, 2008, Leila wrote:
In my language Luo,mother is called 'mama' and in Kiswahili too.
Grandmother in Luo is 'dani'
Grandmother in Kiswahili is 'nyanya'.In Kikuyu,another Kenyan language,grandmother is cucu,with a puctuation like this ~ on top of the u.It is pronounced shosho.

In kiswahili 'sheng' a different Kiswhili used by young people,mother is 'masa' or 'madhe'. Grandmother in Kiswahili sheng is 'nyanye'.”

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This concludes Part I.

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Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Peter Tosh - Equal Rights & Justice (Examples & Lyrics)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases two videos of Peter Tosh's song "Equal Rights & Justice".

This post is presented for cultural, inspirational, and aesthetic purposes.

Thanks to Peter Tosh for his musical legacy. Thanks also to all who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of these examples on YouTube.

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INFORMATION ABOUT PETER TOSH'S SONG "EQUAL RIGHTS AND JUSTICE"
From http://thequietus.com/articles/08468-peter-tosh-equal-rights
..."In 1977 Peter Tosh released Equal Rights, a rallying cry ... his declaration of rage against the injustices he had seen all around him.

It was his finest studio album, cementing his position as one of the most outspoken artists of the 70s. And although he’d suffered at the hands of the ‘shitstem’ many times before, the album notably called not for revenge but for justice. Revenge is personal, justice is political.

Setting out his stall with a version of 'Get Up, Stand Up', Tosh makes it clear that equal rights will not come without a fight. He follows this call to arms with 'Downpressor Man', a warning to any and all oppressors of him and his brethren. “You can run but you can’t hide” Tosh sings, ominously...

He sings on the title track of the album that he doesn’t want peace, but that he needs “equal rights and justice”. It’s here that he asserts his message most powerfully. By dismissing peace so easily, he maintains that what’s needed won’t come without a fight...

But as much as the album is informed by Tosh’s struggle for justice, it is influenced equally by his faith. Tosh had been exposed to the teachings and way of life of the Rastafari as far back as 1963, and by the time he released Equal Rights he was a convert. Both 'African' and 'Jah Guide' make music of his beliefs. Dealing with identity in the former track, Tosh makes clear that to be black is be African; one of Marcus Garvey’s key teachings. In 'Jah Guide' Tosh delivers a rousing justification for the upcoming fight for equal rights: “Jah guide I through this valley.” His path was righteous.

Every form of victimisation is universal, not only in Jamaica.
-Peter Tosh

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FEATURED EXAMPLES
These examples are presented in chronological order based on their publishing date on YouTube, with the oldest example given first.

Example #1: Peter Tosh - Equal Rights



Xraymusicdotcodotuk, Uploaded on May 25, 2007

Audio available on the "Equal Rights" LP/CD
-snip-
LYRICS FOR "EQUAL RIGHTS"
(Peter Tosh)

Everyone is crying out for peace, yes
None is crying out for justice
Everyone is crying out for peace, yes
None is crying out for justice

I don't want no peace
I need equal rights and justice
I need equal rights and justice
I need equal rights and justice
Got to get it, equal rights and justice

Everybody want to go to heaven
But nobody want to die, Father of the Jesus
Everybody want to go up to heaven
But none of them, none of them want to die

I don't want no peace
I man need equal rights and justice
I got to get it, equal rights and justice
I really need it, equal rights and justice
Just give me my share, equal rights and justice

What is due to Caesar
You better give it all to Caesar, yeah, yeah, yeah
And what belong to I and I
You better, you better give it up to I

'Cause I don't want no peace
I need equal rights and justice
I need equal rights and justice
I have got to get it, equal rights and justice
I'm a fighting for it, equal rights and justice

Everyone is heading for the top
But tell me how far is it from the bottom
Nobody knows but everyone fighting for the top
How far is it from the bottom

I don't want no peace
I need equal rights and justice
I need equal rights and justice
I have got to get it, equal rights and justice
I really need it, equal rights and justice

Everyone is talking about crime
Tell me who are the criminals
I said everyone is talking about crime, crime
Tell me who, who are the criminals
I really don't see them

I don't want no peace
I need equal rights and justice
We got to get equal rights and justice
And there will be no crime, equal rights and justice
There will be no criminals, equal rights and justice

Everyone is fighting for equal rights and justice
Palestinians are fighting for equal rights and justice
Down in Angola, equal rights and justice
Down in Botswana, equal rights and justice
Down in Zimbabwe, equal rights and justice
Down in Rhodesia, equal rights and justice

Source: http://www.metrolyrics.com/equal-rights-lyrics-peter-tosh.html

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Examples #2: Peter Tosh - Equal Rights & Justice for Haiti



Welcome2 Haiti, Published on Jul 7, 2012
-snip-
The lyrics that are provided with this video are the standard lyrice for this song. Those lyrics are given after thee videeo given above as Example #1. However, in this performance of "Equal Rights", Peter Tosh combines that song with his song "Downpressor Man". The lyrics to that song begin at 2:44 in the video.

Here's my transcription of that song as sung in that video: (Additions and corrections welcome.)

Everyone is cryin' out for peace (Yes)
None is cryin' out for justice
Everyone is cryin' out for peace
None is cryin' out for Justice
I don't want no peace
I need equal rights and Justice (3x)
Got to get it
Equal rights and lustice

Everybody wants to go to heaven
Nobody wants to die (background singers: "for the rest of Jesus")
Everybody want to go up to heaven but none of them, none of them want to die
I don't want no peace
I want equal rights and justice
Yeah, gotta get equal rights and justice
Oh, we need equal rights and justice
We need equal rights, equal rights and justice

Downpressor* man, where you gonna run to
Tell me
Downpressor, man where you gonna run to
Downpressor man, where you gonna run to
All on that day

You gonna run to the rocks
They gonna be melting
You gonna run to the rocks
The rocks will be melting, man
All on that day

And when you run to the sea,
The sea will be boiling
When you run to the sea,
the sea will be boiling
You run to the sea
The sea will be boiling
I say all on that day.

So tell me, downpressor man
Where you gonna run
Tell me downpressor man
Where you gonna run to
Downpressor man
Where you gonna run to
All on that day

I wouldn't like to be a flea under your collar man
I wouldn't like to be a flea underneath your collar man
I wouldn't like to be a flea underneath your collar man
All on that day

You can run but you can’t hide
You can run but you can’t hide
You can run but you can’t hide,
All on that day

Tell me downpressor man
Tell me downpressor man
Down, down downpressor man
I said downpressor man
I don’t know where you gonna run
All on that day

I said downpressorman
I said downpressorman
I don’t know where you gonna run
All on that day
-snip-
*downpressor is Rastafarian vernacular for "oppressor". A "downpressor" is someone who is pressing you down (with injustices).

The verses in that song that begin with the "downpressor man" reference to the end of that song (except for the "flea under the collar verse) are lifted from the African American Spiritual "Oh Sinner Man". Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/07/nina-simone-sinnerman-with-lyrics.html for a pancocojams post about that song as sung by Nina Simone.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/07/the-wailers-downpressor-man-and-peter.html for a pancocojams post about this song as sung by the Wailers and as sung by Peter Tosh.

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Tofo Tofo (Mozambican Dance Group)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases the ddance group Tofo Tofo from Mozambique, Southeast Africa. Information about Mozambique is included in this post along with information about Tofo Tofo and their South African style of dancing which is known as "pantsula."

The Tofo Tofo group is best known for their collaboration with African American R&B/Pop singer Beyonce in her video "Who Runs The World" (Girls). That video is included as a bonus in this post.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Tofo Tofo for their dance expertise and thanks to Beyonce for her collaboration with this group. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post, and thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

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INFORMATION ABOUT MOZAMBIQUUE
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mozambique
"Mozambique, officially the Republic of Mozambique (Portuguese: Moçambique or República de Moçambique,.. is a country in Southeast Africa bordered by the Indian Ocean to the east, Tanzania to the north, Malawi and Zambia to the northwest, Zimbabwe to the west, and Swaziland and South Africa to the southwest. It is separated from Madagascar by the Mozambique Channel to the east. The capital and largest city is Maputo (previously called Lourenço Marques before independence)."..

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INFORMATION ABOUT TOFO TOFO
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tofo_Tofo_Dance_group
"Tofo Tofo Dance Group is made up of three Mozambican men who integrated Kwaito music and Pantsula dance to create their own unique type of dance that has become internationally celebrated. This new form of movement has brought local African dance onto a global stage.

The word "tofo" means body shaking in the local Mozambique language [in]* Maputo, the area the members of this group are from. The group creates this expression of movement through their combination of dance and music. Both the Kwaito music and Pantsula dance originated in South Africa as ways of expression during the time of Apartheid."
-snip-
EDIIOR'S NOTE*
I substituted the word "in" for the word "of" that was in this article because the sentence stating that "tofo means body changing in the local Mozambique language of Maputo" can be read to infer that "Maputo" is a local language. Actually, there's no language called "Maputo". Maputo is the capitol of Mozambique. I'm not sure which "local Mozambique language" is spoken in Maputo. (As there may be more than one local language spoken in that city, I should have written I'm not sure what local language spoken in Maputo the phrase "tofo tofo" comes from.

At .031 in the video given as Example #2 below, the spokesperson for the group responds to the question what does "tofo tofo" mean by saying "body shaking" and that's from a local langaguage in Mozambique. He also gives a demonstration of that body shaking which is more rhythmic butt shaking from side to side than the overall "shimmy" like body shaking.
-snip-
[return to Wikipedia excerpt]

"Kwaito
The music genre that the Tofo Tofo dance troupe dances to is called Kwaito music, a form of South African house music. This genre started developing in the 1990s. The term Kwaito is derived from the Afrikaans word kwaii, which means strict or angry, although in more common and contemporary use the word is a loose translation of the English term cool...

Pantsula
The type of dance that the Tofo Tofo dance troupe use in their movements is called the Pantsula dance. Pantsula became a popular form of dance in the 1980s when it was used as a means of expression during violent Apartheid times in South African townships, starting mainly in the streets of Soweto...

Pantsula is an energetic and spontaneous expression of the lives of people in the townships. It is described as a flat-footed African tap-and-glide style of dance. The term Pantsula means to waddle like a duck or alternatively to walk with protruded buttocks, which is a characteristic of the dance.[8] In many ways, Pantsula is akin to modern day hip-hop. It is similar to Western-style break dancing for the people in South Africa. They would dance using props, such as brooms, cans or sticks, musical instruments such as large bass drums and dance theatrically as if they were performing on Broadway.[8] The competitive spirits of Pantsula footwork, rhythm and beat were revealed in the streets- characterised by competitions of who could perform the most creative dance of Pantsula.

The evolution of Pantsula is shown through the transition from a township thug dance to the fame of the Tofo Tofo dance troupe...

Rise to fame
World super-star Beyoncé Knowles came across a YouTube video of this group performing. After five months of searching for these men with help from the US Embassy in Maputo, the Tofo Tofo Dance Group was found and flown out to Los Angeles, California to introduce and instruct Beyoncé and her dancers their native dance moves as well as be a part of Beyoncé’s hit music video, Run the World (Girls)...

Where they are now
After their big break with Beyoncé, the men of Tofo Tofo have continued their performances with stars. They have performed opening acts for Fat Joe and Ciara, however this time, it was in Mozambique, their native land. They have continued to perform locally at weddings and other private events."

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FEATURED VIDEOS
These videos are presented in chronological order based on their publishing date on YouTube, with the oldest video given first.

Example #1: Tofo Tofo (Beyoncé - Run the world)



uffeman77 Uploaded on Aug 2, 2009

Mozambican kwaito dance group Tofo Tofo dancing at my wedding
Music: Nisho Njalo by DJ Cleo
-snip-
My guess is that this is the video that Beyonce saw that led to her months long search for the group and finally collaborating with them in her 2011 "Run The World" video.

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Example #2:Beyonce & Tofo Tofo

.

Joel Ken, Uploaded on Jul 5, 2011
-snip-
Here's a comment from this video's discussion thread:
Mario Meyer, 2014
"This dance is not traditional Mozambiquecan and the dance is called PANTSULA, took them 4 months to find the guys when everybody in sa [South Africa] can do it check these school kids dancing on beyonce's music search for the video: PANTSULA DANCE 2013 HD ...FILMED BY STREETCORNER FILMS
=snip-
Here's a link to that video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aT-TdQXYydU

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Example #3: Tofo Tofo jig...

.

Abdikarim Mohamed, Uploaded on Oct 12, 2011

They danced at a wedding in Mozambique and years later, Queen of pop and R&B superstar Beyonce snapped them up for her award winning music video. The Mozambique dance group, Tofo Tofo has grown to become a global sensation after Beyonce's 'run the world girls' won 'Best choreography in a video' at the 2011 MTV music awards. Here's their performance at Tribe Hotel during the YouTube Kenya launch.
-snip-
"Jig" here is an American English word meaning "dance".

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Example #4: Tofo tofo no + jovem



Gabi Caruso, Published on Mar 13, 2013

moçambique , tofo tofo no +jovem, dança muuito

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BONUS VIDEO: Beyoncé - Run the World (Girls)



beyonceVEVO, Uploaded on May 18, 2011

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