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Saturday, January 19, 2019

The Textual (Word) Diversity Of Miss Sue From Alabama Rhymes, Part I - An Analysis Of Three Examples Of "Miss Sue From Alabama" from 1965, 1976, and 1978

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a three part pancocojams series on "Miss Sue From Alabama" children's rhymes, including other titles of examples in this large rhyme family.

This post provides information about a 1934 example of "Miss Sue From Alabama" as given on a Wikipedia page. My comment casting doubt about some of the content of that Wikipedia page is also included in this post.

Part I also provides my analysis of verses for three examples of "Miss Sue From Alabama" from 1965, 1976, and 1978. A comparison of those three examples demonstrate the textual (word) diversity of "Miss Sue From Alabama"'s large family of children's rhymes.

Part II of this series presents a partial list of verses from stand alone rhymes that are found in "Miss Sue From Alabama" rhymes.

Part III of this series presents a partial sample of versions of the line "wipe those cooties off of me" in some examples of "Miss Sue From Alabama" children's rhyme.

The content of this page is presented for folkloric and recreational purposes.

Thanks to all who contributed examples of this rhyme that are included in this post. Thanks also to all who are quoted in this post. Special thanks to burgundyblake who shared an example of a "Mazoo From Alabama" rhyme with pancocojams on January 17, 2019. That example prompted me to continue my research on this rhyme family.
-snip-
Previous pancocojams posts on "Miss Sue From Alabama" can be found by clicking the "Miss Sue From Alabama" tag that is found below this post.

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INFORMATION ABOUT EARLY VERSIONS OF "MISS SUE FROM ALABAMA"
Here's information about "Miss Sue From Alabama" from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miss_Sue_from_Alabama
" "Miss Sue From Alabama" is a song sung by African American children in the South at the turn of the 20th century. The children would then dance with each other. Miss Sue was, in African American folklore, a prostitute that lured White men to bed and then manipulated them into doing favors for the Black men on the plantation. She was somewhat of a spy an undercover agent that worked in behalf of Black men.[citation needed]

The song was recorded in 1934 and 1939.[1]"
-snip-
I strongly doubt the portion of that Wikipedia page that is highlighted in italics. The source for that information isn't cited and at all appear to be rooted in any historical facts.

The reference to children dancing with each other after singing this song also seems to be disputable. Given the general practice of African American performances, it's likely that children performed some movements which might be considered dance while they sang (chanted) this song (rhyme).

Wikipedia cites Check-list of recorded songs in the English language in the Archive of American folk song to July, 1940: Alphabetical list with geographical index, Volumes 1-3* as the source for those 1934 and 1939 examples of "Miss Sue From Alabama".

*https://books.google.com/books?id=O08wAAAAMAAJ&q=%22Miss+Sue+From+Alabama%22&dq=%22Miss+Sue+From+Alabama%22&num=100&client=firefox-a&pgis=1

The text of those examples aren't included in that source's Wikipedia page.

However, the 1934 example is credited to "Eight Negro girls; Kirby industrial school, Atmore, Ala [Alabama]; John A Lomax, 1934.
Note: John A. Lomax was the person who collected that example. The 1939 examples were from Mississippi and from Louisiana.

****
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
Many English language (jump rope and hand clap) playground rhymes are made by combining a line or lines from other stand alone children's rhymes.

A "stand alone" rhyme is one that can be recited by itself.

I refer to the line or lines from stand alone that are found in other rhymes as "add ons", However, "add on" here doesn't mean that these lines are only found at the end of a particular rhyme.

Example #1 and #2 are presented as they were found (online or in a book) except for the numbers I gave to each line as a means of analyzing each of these rhyme examples.

Example #2 is my transcription from a YouTube video (with assigned numbers for the purpose of textual analysis. Additions and corrections are welcome for this transcription.

****
EXAMPLE ANALYSIS
EXAMPLE #1 (Mississippi, circa 1965)
1. Miss Sue
2. Miss Sue
3. Miss Sue from Alabama

4. Someone is in your garden
5. Miss Sue
6. Miss Sue
7. Someone is in your garden
8. Miss Sue from Alabama

9. Show me what you can do
10. Miss Sue
11. Miss Sue
12. Show me what you can do
13. Miss sue from Alabama

14. Is this the way you do
15. Miss Sue
16. Miss Sue
17. Is this the way you do
18. Miss Sue from Alabama

19. Hey Hey
20. A doobie-do-wah
21. Your mama's broke
22. And your papa's broke
23. Turn to the east
24. Turn to the west
25. Turn to the very one you love the best
26. Milk in the pitcher
27. The butter's in the bowl
28. Can't catch a sweetheart
29. To save your soul


I think this is the way we sang this game in Northern Mississippi cira 1965.
-GUEST,nanasallthat, 11 Dec 07, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097
Subject: RE: Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes?
-snip-
This contributor didn't include any racial demographic information. However, the textual structure and vernacular language of this example is clearly of African American origin.

Verses in this example:
Verse #1: lines 1-3 ["Miss Sue From Alabama" verse]
Verse #2: lines 4-8 ["Someone's in your garden" verse]
Verse #3: lines 9-13 ["Show me what you can do verse which corresponds to the still familiar verse in 2018 for some children's singing games that begins with "Let me see your motion"]
Verse #4: lines 14-18 ["Is this the way you do" verse which corresponds to the still familiar verse in 2018 for some children's singing games that begins with "We can do your motion"]
Lines 19 & 20 serve as connecting (bridging) lines from one verse (one portion of this rhyme) to another. My guess is that the scatting words "A dobbie -do-wah" (line 20) and/or similar scatting words are the source for the "Scooby Doo" reference in contemporary (1980s?) or thereabouts "Miss Sue From Alabama" rhymes, i.e. "Miss Sue, Scooby Doo, Miss Sue From Alabama."
Verse #5: lines 21-22 ["Your mama's broke"/And your papa's broke" are probably a part of some other children's rhyme]
Verse #6: lines 23-25 ["Turn to the East" verse; This verse is still recited in some children's singing games today.
Verse #7: line 26-29: [Milk in the pitcher verse; This verse (and the "Turn To The East" verse) are found in other African American folk rhymes such as in Thomas W. Talley's 1922 book Negro Folk Rhymes: Wise And Otherwise.the 1922 compilation.]

****
EXAMPLE #2: (New York City, 1976)
1. mmm-Miss Sue (clap clap clap)
2. Miss Sue (clap clap clap)
3. Miss Sue from Alabama
4. Now let’s have a party.
5. Chicka boom chicka boom
6. chicka boom boom boom
7. Now let’s have a tic tac toe
8. Ah tic ah tac ah tic tac toe
9. My mother’s in the kitchen peelin white potatoes
10. My father’s in the alley drinkin lemonade-o
11. Brother in the clink waitin for the clock to go
12. boom tic tock boom tick a wally wally (7x)
boom tic tock

13. Miss Sue (clap clap clap)
14. Miss Sue (clap clap clap)
15. Miss Sue from Alabama
16. She ma
17. My mother had a baby
18. My father called it crazy
19. But, if it’s a girl
20. I’ll give it a curl
21. And If it’s a boy
22. I’ll give it a toy.
23. Wrap it up in toilet paper
24. Send it down the elevator
25. First floor ¬ Stop!
26. (Think it over)
27. Second floor -Stop!
28. (Think it over)
29. Third floor, you better not stop
20. 'Cause S.T.O.P spells stop.
-Songs for Children from New York City [1976] Songs for Children from New York City, 1976;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BzyI9N6i0WU [sound file]

Provided to YouTube by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

℗ 2004 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings / 1978 Folkways Records
Transcribed by Azizi Powell from the sound file published on YouTube.
-snip-
Verses in this example:
Verse #1: lines 1-3 ["Miss Sue From Alabama" verse]
Verse #2: lines 4-8 ["Now let's have ___" verse; "Let's have a party" with rhythmic nonsense words bridging lines "Chicka boom chicka boom" followed by "Now let’s have a tic tac toe".]
Verse #3: lines 9-12 ["My mothers in the kitchen" verse. This verse appears to be very similar to a verse from "Rockin Robin" ("Twee Lee Lee") children's rhyme. Note "clink" = "jail"]
Verse #4: lines 13 & 15 ["Miss Sue From Alabama" verse]
Line 16: rhythmic connecting [bridging] scatting words
Verse #5: lines 17-20 ["My mother had a baby" [also known as "Mama's having a baby" rhyme]

****
EXAMPLE #3: [1978, St. Louis, Missouri]
1. Miss Sue
2. Miss Sue from Alabama
3. Hey you,
4. scooby do
5. your Mama's got the measles
6. Your papa's got the flu
7. magic measles
8. magic flu
9. Take an a b c d e f g
10. Take an h i j k l.m.n.o.p.
11. Take a smooth shot
12. Take a smooth shot
13. and now freeze.
-Eleanor Fulton, Pat Smith, editors Let's Slice The Ice, (Magnamusic-Baton, 1978; St. Louis, Missouri; p. 16)
-snip-
Verses in this example:
Verse #1: lines 1-2 ["Miss Sue From Alabama" verse]
Verse #2: lines 3-4 [Hey You, Scooby Do" verse]
Verse #3: lines 5-9 [Your Mama's got the measles" verse]
Verse #4: lines 9-12 "Take a b c d e f g verse"
Ending line followed by a certain action [such as staring and trying not to be the first person who blinks] - "and now freeze"
-snip-
Pancocojams Editor's note:
I now think that the words "take a smooth shot" originated from "take a flu shot" [an immunization to prevent against getting influenza [disease]. That said, "take a smooth shot" may still have the meaning "to do something difficult with finesse" that I guessed was the meaning when I first published this post.]

****
This concludes Part I of this three part pancocojams series on "The Textual Diversity Of Miss Sue From Alabama Rhymes".

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.
Thank

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Archived Lists Of Pancocojams Posts About Africa In General Or About More Than Two African Nations (2011-2018)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is a compilation of all of the posts that have been published between 2011 through 2018 on this pancocojams blog about the music, dance, and other cultural aspects of Africa in general or about more than two African nations.

In addition to the posts on this archived list, some other information about these African nations may also be found in the upcoming pancocojams archived lists of posts about other nations (for example, with regard to songs that are performed by people from more than one African nation) as well as on the upcoming archived list of posts about general information about Africa, or on other archived lists.

The posts that are included in these lists are only found on one pancocojams list even though some of them could have (also) been added to other pancocojams archived lists.

Click the "archived lists of pancocojams posts on Africa" tag that is found below for other archived lists in this series.
These lists have been prepared for archiving purposes and to raise public awareness about these posts.

Note that these archived lists aren't hyperlinked. Please use Google search or this blog's internal search engine to access individual posts that are found on these lists.

Thanks to all those who have contributed to these posts.
-snip-
*Note: I'm aware that there are other North African nations which weren't showcased in a pancocojams post. These omissions were not done on purpose.

DISCLAIMER:
These showcased videos/sound files aren't meant to represent any popularity ranking or "best of" listing in these African nations or elsewhere, although some of these songs may indeed be quite popular in those nations and elsewhere.

I found most of the music and dance videos on these lists by "surfing" YouTube for songs and/or videos from these nations that are aesthetically pleasing to me. In addition to that criteria, I was introduced to some songs as a result of them being mentioned by commenters in discussion threads for certain African songs. I also chose to publish a post about some YouTube sound files or videos on these lists because of their high numbers of views.

I realize that what is aesthetically pleasing to me (as an individual and as an African American) may not necessarily be representative of what is aesthetically pleasing to people from the African nations that are the focus of this post. Furthermore, I'm aware that my perception of these songs and videos is from the standpoint of an African American (for instance, in some of these selections, my focus on the vocalists and/or the discussion thread commenters' use of African American vernacular English.)

I also realize that a list compiled by any other person would be different from the list that I've compiled.

It would be interesting to compare these selected videos (and the text only excerpts) with lists from other people who are from the nation where these videos and text excerpts come from and who -like me- aren't from that nation.

Visitor comments and additions to these posts' discussion threads and/or to this list's discussion thread are welcome.

****
ARCHIVED LISTS OF PANCOCOJAMS POSTS ABOUT VARIOUS AFRICAN NATIONS (2011 through 2018)
Note: This blog began in August 2011.

The URL for each of these posts are given along with their titles and dates. However, these web addresses won't work as a hyperlink on this blog. Numbers are assigned to posts within their publishing year for referencing purposes only.

2011

1. All African Dances Aren't About Shaking Your Booty
December 29, 2011, https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/12/all-african-dances-arent-about-shaking.html

****
2012

1. Three African Children's Choirs
January 1, 2012; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/01/three-african-childrens-choirs.html

**
2. Bamboula Dance and Music - Then & Now
January 9, 2012; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/01/bamboula-dance-and-music-then-now.html

**
3. Traditional African Hip Shaking Dances
May 8, 2012; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/05/traditional-african-hip-shaking-dances.html

**
4. Videos Of West African Talking Drums
May 18, 2012; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/05/videos-of-west-african-talking-drums.html

**
5. Videos Of African Musical Productions, Part I
May 23, 2012; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/05/videos-of-african-musical-productions.html

**
6. Videos Of African Musical Productions, Part II
May 23, 2012; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/05/videos-of-african-musical-productions_23.html

**
7. Seven Videos Of African Reggae Artists
July 1, 2012; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/07/seven-videos-of-african-reggae-artists.html

****
2013
1. The African Custom Of Spraying Money
March 23, 2013; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-african-custom-of-spraying-money.html

****
2014

1. The History & Significance Of The Pan-African Red, Gold, And Green Flags
January 21, 2014; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/01/the-history-significance-of-pan-african.html

**
2. African Proverbs (information, text examples, and music example)
March 2, 2014; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/03/african-proverbs-information-text.html

**
3. Words For Father & Mother In Various African Languages (A-L)
September 19, 2014; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/09/words-for-father-mother-in-various.html

**
4. Words For Father & Mother In Various African Languages (M-Z)
September 19, 2014: https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/09/words-for-father-and-mother-in-various.html

****
2015

1. Stilt Walking In Africa (information, comments, & videos)
November 1, 2015; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/11/stilt-walking-in-africa-information.html

****
2016
1. "Dreams As Validator In Traditional African Cultures" (pdf excerpt)
April 23, 2016; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/04/dreams-as-validator-in-traditional.html

**
God, Divinities, And Spirits in African Traditional Religious Ontology (Excerpt From Nigerian Scholarly Paper)
August 19, 2016; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/08/god-divinities-and-spirits-in-african.html

**
3. "Africans & Their Names For God" (compiled by John S. Mbiti)
August 19, 2016; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/08/africans-their-names-for-god-compiled.html

**
4. Etymologies (Origins & Meanings) Of The Place Name "Africa" & African Nation Names
November 25, 2016; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/11/etymologies-origins-meanings-of-place.html

****
2017

1. An Excerpt From Joseph K. Adjaye's Book "Time in the Black Experience" About Kiswahili, Luganda, & Lingala Days Of The Week
April 21, 2017; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/04/an-excerptfrom-joseph-k-adjayes-book.html

**
2. Names For The Days Of The Week In Arabic & In Seven (African) Bantu Languages
April 22, 2017; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/04/names-for-days-of-week-in-arabic-in.html

**
3. Names For Days Of The Week In Three Mande Languages: Bambara, Jula, and Mandinka
April 28, 2017; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/04/names-for-days-of-week-in-three-mande.html

**
4. Excerpts from Selected Articles About Luo Naming Traditions (East Africa)
June 1, 2017; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/06/excerpts-from-selected-articles-about.html

**
5. 2009 Pdf Excerpt From Stanford University: "The Spread Of Islam In West Africa"
October 6, 2017; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/10/2009-pdf-excerpt-spread-of-islam-in.html

****
2018

1. Seven YouTube Videos Of West Africans Wearing Dots And/Or Other Face And Body Paint
January 5, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/01/seven-youtube-videos-of-west-africans.html

**
2. Two Videos That Showcase African Face & Body Painting And African Scarification
January 6, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/01/two-videos-that-showcase-african-face.html

**
3. Excerpts About The Meanings Of The Color White In Seven Traditional African Cultures
January 8, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/01/excerpts-about-meanings-of-color-white.html

**
4. Two Pancocojams African Language Quizzes (with links to information about these languages)
February 18, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/02/two-pancocojams-african-language.html

**
5. Various African Cultural Elements That Are Found In The 2018 Fictional Black Panther Movie (with Black Panther trailer video)
February 19, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/02/various-african-cultural-elements-that.html

**
6. Reactions To The 2018 Black Panther Movie From Africans And From People From The African Diaspora
February 20, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/02/reactions-to-2018-black-panther-movie.html

**
7. How People Shake Hands In Various African Nations (article excerpts & videos)
February 28, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/02/how-people-shake-hands-in-eight-african.html

**
8. "The Song That Gets Africans On The Dance Floor", Vlog Part 1 , Part 2, & Part 3 (vlogs & selected comments)
March 6, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/03/the-song-that-gets-africans-on-dance.html

**
9. Information About & Examples Of Traditional African Twin Names
March 8, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/03/information-about-examples-of.html

**
10. 2010 Journal Article Reprint: "African Names: A Guide for Editors" by Bernard Appiah
March 21, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/03/2010-journal-article-reprint-african.html

**
11. Reprint Of The 2003 Article "BBC Africa Live Asks, Does Your Name Affect Who You Are?" (with selected comments)
March 21, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/03/reprint-of-2003-article-bbc-africa-live.html

**
12. Eight Videos Of Tusker Project Fame (2006-2013 East African Singing Competition Television Series)
March 22, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/03/eighth-videos-of-tusker-project-fame.html

**
13. YouTube Discussion Thread Comments About DNA Testing To Identify A Person's Specific African Genetic Makeup
July 24, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/07/youtube-discussion-thread-comments.html

**
14. Eight Examples Of Traditional African Dances In Which Dancers Hold A Stick (Including A Fly Whisk)
August 30, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/08/eight-examples-of-traditional-african.html

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Archived Lists Of Pancocojams Posts About The North African Nations Of Morocco & Algeria (2015-2018)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is a compilation of all of the posts that have been published on this pancocojams blog about the music, dance, and other cultural aspects of Morocco and Algeria [from 2014-2018].* One post about North African in general is also included in this compilation.

In addition to the posts on this archived list, some other information about these North African nations may also be found in the upcoming pancocojams archived lists of posts about other nations (for example, with regard to songs that are performed by people from more than one African nation) as well as on the upcoming archived list of posts about general information about Africa, or on other archived lists.

The posts that are included in these lists are only found on one pancocojams list even though some of them could have (also) been added to other pancocojams archived lists.

Click the "archived lists of pancocojams posts on Africa" tag that is found below for other archived lists in this series.
These lists have been prepared for archiving purposes and to raise public awareness about these posts.

Note that these archived lists aren't hyperlinked. Please use Google search or this blog's internal search engine to access individual posts that are found on these lists.

Thanks to all those who have contributed to these posts.
-snip-
*Note: I'm aware that there are other North African nations which weren't showcased in a pancocojams post. These omissions were not done on purpose.

DISCLAIMER:
These showcased videos/sound files aren't meant to represent any popularity ranking or "best of" listing in these African nations or elsewhere, although some of these songs may indeed be quite popular in those nations and elsewhere.

I found most of the music and dance videos on these lists by "surfing" YouTube for songs and/or videos from these nations that are aesthetically pleasing to me. In addition to that criteria, I was introduced to some songs as a result of them being mentioned by commenters in discussion threads for certain African songs. I also chose to publish a post about some YouTube sound files or videos on these lists because of their high numbers of views.

I realize that what is aesthetically pleasing to me (as an individual and as an African American) may not necessarily be representative of what is aesthetically pleasing to people from the North African nations that are the focus of this post. Furthermore, I'm aware that my perception of these songs and videos is from the standpoint of an African American (for instance, in some of these selections, my focus on the vocalists and/or the discussion thread commenters' use of African American vernacular English.)

I also realize that a list compiled by any other person would be different from the list that I've compiled.

It would be interesting to compare these selected videos (and the text only excerpts) with lists from other people who are from the nation where these videos and text excerpts come from and who -like me- aren't from that nation.

Visitor comments and additions to these posts' discussion threads and/or to this list's discussion thread are welcome.

****
ARCHIVED LISTS OF PANCOCOJAMS POSTS ABOUT VARIOUS NORTH AFRICAN NATIONS (2015 through 2018)
Note: This blog began in August 2011.

The URL for each of these posts are given along with their titles and dates. However, these web addresses won't work as a hyperlink on this blog. Numbers are assigned to posts within their publishing year for referencing purposes only.

2015
Moroccan Folk Music & Dance (sound file, videos, & comments)
March 29, 2015; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/03/moroccan-folk-music-dance-sound-file.html

Moroccan (Non-Berber) Dance Party Video
March 29, 2015; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/03/moroccan-non-berber-dance-party-video.html

2016

****
2017

1. Oum- Taragalite (Soul Of Morocco) (information, lyrics, video, & comments)
September 5, 2017; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/09/oum-taragalite-soul-of-morocco.html

****
2018

1. Chaoui Ethnic Group's (Algeria, North Africa) Rahaba Music & Dance (information & videos)
January 1, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/01/chaoui-ethnic-groups-algeria-north.html

**
2. Information About & Descriptions Of Traditional Female Tattoos Among The Chaoui (Algeria, North Africa)
January 3, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/01/information-about-descriptions-of.html

**
3.
North Africans & African Identity (Quotes From A YouTube Discussion Thread And An Excerpt Of & Selected Comments From A 2015 Guardian Article)
March 28, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/03/north-africans-african-identity-quotes.html

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.


Archived Lists Of Pancocojams Post About Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, and & Gabon (Central Africa) from 2013-2018

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is a compilation of all of the posts that have been published on this pancocojams blog about the music, dance, and other cultural aspects of The Democratic Republic of the Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, and & Gabon (Central Africa) [from 2014-2018].*

In addition to the posts on this archived list, some other information about these Central African nations may also be found in the upcoming pancocojams archived lists of posts about other nations (for example, with regard to songs that are performed by people from more than one African nation) as well as on the upcoming archived list of posts about general information about Africa, or on other archived lists.

The posts that are included in these lists are only found on one pancocojams list even though some of them could have (also) been added to other pancocojams archived lists.

Click the "archived lists of pancocojams posts on Africa" tag that is found below for other archived lists in this series.
These lists have been prepared for archiving purposes and to raise public awareness about these posts.

Note that these archived lists aren't hyperlinked. Please use Google search or this blog's internal search engine to access individual posts that are found on these lists.

Thanks to all those who have contributed to these posts.
-snip-
*Note: I'm aware that there are other Central African nations which weren't showcased in a pancocojams post. These omissions were not done on purpose.

DISCLAIMER:
These showcased videos/sound files aren't meant to represent any popularity ranking or "best of" listing in these African nations or elsewhere, although some of these songs may indeed be quite popular in those nations and elsewhere.

I found most of the music and dance videos on these lists by "surfing" YouTube for songs and/or videos from these nations that are aesthetically pleasing to me. In addition to that criteria, I was introduced to some songs as a result of them being mentioned by commenters in discussion threads for certain African songs. I also chose to publish a post about some YouTube sound files or videos on these lists because of their high numbers of views.

I realize that what is aesthetically pleasing to me (as an individual and as an African American) may not necessarily be representative of what is aesthetically pleasing to people from the Central African nations that are the focus of this post. Furthermore, I'm aware that my perception of these songs and videos is from the standpoint of an African American (for instance, in some of these selections, my focus on the vocalists and/or the discussion thread commenters' use of African American vernacular English.)

I also realize that a list compiled by any other person would be different from the list that I've compiled.

It would be interesting to compare these selected videos (and the text only excerpts) with lists from other people who are from the nation where these videos and text excerpts come from and who -like me- aren't from that nation.

Visitor comments and additions to these posts' discussion threads and/or to this list's discussion thread are welcome.

****
ARCHIVED LISTS OF PANCOCOJAMS POSTS ABOUT VARIOUS CENTRAL AFRICAN NATIONS (2011 through 2018)
Note: This blog began in August 2011.

The URL for each of these posts are given along with their titles and dates. However, these web addresses won't work as a hyperlink on this blog. Numbers are assigned to posts within their publishing year for referencing purposes only.

2013
1. Bibi Tanga & the Selenites – “Poet Of The Soul” & Four Other Selections (Central African Republic)
May 7, 2013; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/05/bibi-tanga-selenites-poet-of-soul-four.html

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2. Five Videos Of Music By Koffi Olomide (From 2006-2012) [Democratic Republic of the Congo]
July 20, 2013; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/07/five-videos-of-music-by-koffi-olomide.html

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2014

1. Congolese singer Tabu Ley Rochereau - "Kaful Mayay" (sound file & comments)
January 28, 2014; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/01/congolese-singer-tabu-ley-rochereau.html

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2. Mbilia Bel - "Faux Pas" (Congo)
May 27, 2014; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/05/mbilia-bel-faux-pas-congo.html

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3. Nyboma & Pepe Kalle with Dally Kimoko - "Nina" (Congolese Soukous Music)
May 27, 2014; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/05/nyboma-pepe-kalle-with-dally-kimoko.html

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4. Five Congolese Religious Songs Entitled "Ngolu"
July 9, 2014; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/07/five-congolese-religious-songs-entitled.html

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5. Fally Ipupa - Original (Democratic Republic Of The Congo Dance Video)
July 9, 2014; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/07/fally-ipupa-original-democratic.html

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6. JB Mpiana- Ndombolo (sound file, information, comments)
July 9, 2014; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/07/jb-mpiana-ndombolo-sound-file.html

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2015
1. Maitre Gazonga - Jaloux Saboteurs (North Central Africa)
January 18, 2015 https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/01/maitre-gazonga-jaloux-saboteurs-chad.html

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2. Descriptions Of The Kongolese Competitive Dance "Nsunsa"
March 15, 2015; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/03/descriptions-of-kongolese-competitive.html

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3. Congolese Nzango And Ghanaian Ampe (Information & Videos)
March 15, 2015; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/03/congolese-nzango-and-ghanaian-ampe.html

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4. Zokela Bands (Central African Republic dance music)
March 27, 2015; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/03/seven-examples-of-zokela-bands.html

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5. Congolese Gospel Song - Alleluia Amen (with Lingala lyrics & English translation)
July 11, 2015; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/07/congolese-gospel-song-alleluia-amen.html

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6. Equatorial Guinean (Central African) Singer Maele Ndong - "Abom" & Six Other Songs
July 18, 2015; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/07/equatorial-guinean-singer-maele-ndong.html

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7. Congolese Vocalist Mbilia Bel - Boyayé (Boya Ye) YouTube examples, and English lyrics
September 3, 2015; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/09/congolese-vocalist-mbilia-bel-boyaye.html

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8. Five Videos Of The Gabonese (Central African) Vocalist Patience Dabany
September 24, 2015; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/09/five-videos-of-gabonese-vocalist.html

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9. Videos Of Ikoku, A Traditional Central African Dance
September 24, 2015; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/09/videos-of-ikoku-traditional-central.html

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1. Two Videos Of Traditional Congolese Dancing That Include Body Patting & Stepping Movements
August 30, 2016; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/08/two-videos-of-traditional-congolese.html

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2017

1. Information About & Videos Of The Baka People (Central Africa)
January 9, 2017; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/01/information-about-videos-of-baka-people.html

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2. Congolese Vocalist Koffi Olomide - "Effrakata" (information, video, comments,& lyrics)
February 13, 2017; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/02/congolese-vocalist-koffi-olomide.html

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3. The Klag Dance & Other Traditional Mbaye Dances (Chad, Africa)
March 8, 2017; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/03/the-klag-dance-other-traditional-mbaye.html

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4. Democratic Republic Of The Congo (Kinshasa) Singer DM - "Makolongulu" (contemporary dance video with selected comments)
April 7, 2017; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/04/congolese-singer-dm-makolongulu-with.html

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5. Oum- Taragalite (Soul Of Morocco) (information, lyrics, video, & comments)
, September 5, 2017; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/09/oum-taragalite-soul-of-morocco.html

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6. Two Bayuda Du Congo Videos (with selected comments) From the Democratic Republic Of The Congo (Kinshasa)
September 11, 2017; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/09/two-bayuda-du-congo-videos-with.html

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7. Why Is Chad On The USA Travel Ban List? (Article Excerpt, Wikipedia Excerpt, YouTube Videos & Comments)
September 25, 2017 https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/09/why-is-chad-on-usa-travel-ban-list.html

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2018

1. Seven YouTube Videos Of Traditional Congolese Dancers & Musicians Wearing Dots And/Or Other Face And Body Paint
January 3, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/01/seven-youtube-videos-of-traditional.html

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2. Excerpts About The Traditional Meanings Of Specific Colors, Designs, & Objects In The Kuba & Luba Ethnic Groups Of The Democratic Republic Of The Congo
January 7, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/01/excerpts-about-traditional-meanings-of.html

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3. Awilo Longomba - "Karolina" (Congolese dance song video & comments)
March 7, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/03/awilo-longomba-karolina-cpngolese-dance.html

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4. Democratic Republic Of The Congo Tshiluba (Ciluba; Luba-Kasai) Language Names That Begin With The Letters "Tsh"
March 8, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/03/democratic-republic-of-congo-tshiluba.html

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5. Congolese Singer Tshala Muana - "Lekela Muadi" (sound file, lyrics, & comments)
March 9, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/03/congolese-singer-tshala-muana-lekela.html

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6. Awilo Longomba & P-Square - Enemy Solo (Lingala lyrics, video & comments)
May 24, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/05/awilo-longomba-p-square-enemy-solo.html

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7. YouTube Examples Of Gabonese Singer/Composer Oliver N'Goma's Song "Bane" (with English lyrics)
July 12, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/07/information-about-afro-zouk-music.html

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8. Gabonese Afro-Zouk Singer Oliver N'Goma - "Adia" (Part I - information & lyrics in its original languages, in English, & in French)
July 9, 2018; https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/07/gabonese-singer-oliver-ngoma-adia-part.html

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9. The Global Reach Of Gabonese Afro-Zouk Singer Oliver N'Goma's Song "Adia" (sound file and selected comments)
July 10, 2018 https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/07/the-global-reach-of-gabonese-afro-zouk.html

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