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Sunday, June 16, 2019

Selected Comments From Two YouTube Discussion Threads For Sam Henshaw's Song "Church"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part pancocojams series about Black British singer Samm Henshaw's song "Church" featuring the African American Hip Hop duo EarthGang.

Part II presents selected comments from the discussion thread of the official video of Samm Henshaw's song "Church" featuring EarthGang. Part II also highlights selected comments from the discussion thread for the YouTube lyrics video of this song.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/06/samm-henshaw-featuring-earthgang-church.html for Part I of this series. Part I showcases the official YouTube video of the song "Church" by Samm Henshaw featuring EarthGang. for Part I of this series. Part I showcases the official YouTube video of the song "Church" by Samm Henshaw featuring EarthGang.

Information about Samm Henshaw is also included in that post along with information about EarthGang.

This content is presented for cultural and linguistic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owner.

Thanks to Samm Henshaw and thanks to EarthGang for their musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are featured in this video and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: Samm Henshaw - Church (Official Video) ft. EARTHGANG



Samm Henshaw, Published on Feb 5, 2019

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THE DISCUSSION THREAD FOR THIS EMBEDDED VIDEO
(I've added numbers for referencing purposes only. All of these comments are from Feb. 5, 2019 to June 15, 2019. Explanations for African American Vernacular English terms that are found in some of these comments are given after those comments.)

1. ruth
"I play this every sunday while getting ready for church πŸ˜‚πŸ’ž"

**
2. Jourdan Washington
"These visuals and production are πŸ”₯"

**
3. NGDMBGA 360
"this mans is slept on, cant wait for him to blow up"
-snip-
"Sel
**
REPLY
4. TheLadyEmerald809
"exactly what i was thinking. literally this first time ive ever heard him, love everything about it"

**
REPLY
5. Ankita Bhanot
"He's about to go big! I can't wait for his next projects."

**
REPLY
6. comey2610
"Very talented man"

**
7. Renas salahudden
" "I don’t care who you praying to,I just pray you believe in you.” ❤️
Amen"

**
REPLY
8. Dr. Octagon
"Renas salahudden bless up!"

**
REPLY
9. Musicdudeyoutub
"As he flashes devil's horns 2:36"

**
REPLY
10. Joshua Rego
"Musicdudeyoutub i don’t think he was making the devils horns, i think he was just pointing up, as he said that line. you can’t immediately assume that he’s doing some satanic imagery, relax bro."

**
REPLY
11. Odlum
"A) probably just pointing B) even if he's trying to send a "message", it's actually the sign for "I love you" in ASL, not the devil's horns. Also fits with the lyrics. Get that sh&t* right."
-snip-
"ASL"= American Sign Language
*This word is fully spelled out in this comment.

**
12. sophie-san ichigo
"These Dragon ball references lol"

**
13. El Gordo
"Flying Nimbus and the 2 Saiyan pods landing? Where's Goku?"

**
14. Brandon Herndon
"Yeah, this dude has been watching his Dragonball"
-snip-
Here's some information about Dragonball
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragon_Ball
"Dragon Ball (Japanese: γƒ‰γƒ©γ‚΄γƒ³γƒœγƒΌγƒ« Hepburn: Doragon Bōru), sometimes styled as Dragonball, is a Japanese media franchise created by Akira Toriyama in 1984. The initial manga, written and illustrated by Toriyama, was serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump from 1984 to 1995... The series follows the adventures of the protagonist, Son Goku, from his childhood through adulthood as he trains in martial arts and explores the world in search of the seven orbs known as the Dragon Balls, which summon a wish-granting dragon when gathered. Along his journey, Goku makes several friends and battles a wide variety of villains, many of whom also seek the Dragon Balls.

Toriyama's manga was adapted and divided into two anime series produced by Toei Animation: Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z, which together were broadcast in Japan from 1986 to 1996. Additionally, the studio has developed 20 animated feature films and three television specials, as well as two anime sequel series titled Dragon Ball GT (1996–1997) and Dragon Ball Super (2015–2018)."...

**
15. Marcus Brown
"I’m not a fan of gospel music but this song is pure positive energy πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯"

**
16. Shy Guy Music
"I haven't been to church in a long ass time...but this here might get me there"

**
17. Sanaa Ray
"Wake up and get yourself to church Lots of love :-) xxxx"

**
18. lizzy o
"Finally a rap that's not about girls with big booty getting high and being Rich πŸ˜‚❤️:

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REPLY
19. dkicefire
"I mean there is alot of rap like this. People just are not looking in the right places. Between Chance the Rapper and Childish Bambino there are some good ones. Also more obscure ones like Watsky and SonReal have mostly positive uplifting stuff."

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REPLY
20. Montee Stowes
"Rap music has been like this from the beginning. I hate this kind of ignorant stupidity."

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REPLY
21. dkicefire
"@Montee Stowes well yes some of it was and when it started it was all about the struggle. But to say its never been about that seems flawed. If you look at just popular rap in the 00s it was definitly filled with that stuff, but if you look at groups like Outkast, while there hits can be about booty and the like there are some meaningful songs outside that just are not seen. To someone who knows nothing about rap it can be seen that way. Its sadly misguided but understandable."

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REPLY
22. J Aff
"ITS not rap though..."

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REPLY
23. ohmie homie
"@J Aff it is atleast earthgangs verse"

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REPLY
24. Sarah Carr
"there's a lot more good music out there like this trust me! It's all I listen to :) Gotta find it check out Gawvi, Toby Mac, Hollyn, Jamie Grace, Social Club Misfits, KB (long live the champion) Cortes (Say I) and there's many more that aren't main stream but so much better!"

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REPLY
25. Tim Soucy
"Search Dr Souc! His music is great ! It covers alot of genres πŸ™πŸŽΆ"

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REPLY
26. Souseman1
"@Tim Soucy i love him!!!!"

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REPLY
27. Tom Hanks
"@Tim Soucy Dr Souc has some great music for sure !!!!"

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REPLY
28. Frederico Baami
"Is this rap or r&b? (that's a honest question)"

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REPLY
29. S Scott
"I wouldn’t call his music rap..."

****
30. Teona
"Church does pop off like this though. Boring for a solid hour then they hit you with that gospel, the Holy Spirit comes out of the woodwork and everyone gets blessed. Church is the OG place for a bop and a solid "yo it was lit", if that's not your experience, you're at the wrong Church."
-snip-
"OG" = means "Original Gangster"; but, in the context of this comment, "OG" means "original"

"lit" = very hot (meaning, "very good"

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REPLY
31. I'm Just Saying
"My church is lit from the moment you walk in...lol Than again I go to a Pentecostal church. Apostolic by faith, Pentecostal by experience!!! 😁

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REPLY
32. MaryMary _
"we all worship different. some love to shout it on the top of their lungs. others in reverence & some do both 😁🀷🏼‍♀️ respect to all"

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33. Connor Crawf
"nobody else going to acknowledge these guys are all very similar in style to chance the rapper, especially his coloring book project.. amazing vibes"

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REPLY
34. EluzDray
"Definitely agree"

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35. Dexter Dexian
"They need to do a remix with chance the rapper!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

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REPLY
36. Kuro White
"Why "Chance the rapper" in particular ?"

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REPLY
37. Dexter Dexian
"@Kuro White they sound very similar"

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REPLY
38. Brandon
"Kuro White this is his type of beat"

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REPLY
39. MILLI FEMME
"@Kuro White because I thought it WAS chance at first listen."

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40. Laffy Taffy
"EarthGang got a Outkast vibe. Good song"

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41. lynnetta seabury
"Gospel OutKast.... I am feeling this cut!! YessssssssssπŸ‘ŠπŸΎπŸ‘ŠπŸΎπŸ‘ŠπŸΎπŸ‘ŠπŸΎ"

**
42. Ishaan Kumar
"wake up and get yourself detergent"

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REPLY
43. Jonathan the Hiker
"I can't unhear that now..."

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REPLY
44. k- dawg
"I hate you loool"

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REPLY
45. Eiji Okumura
"You dont understand how much u just ruined this song for me"

**
REPLY
46. Philofasus
"This song is officially my new " do the dishes " starter song. Good lookin out!!"

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47. mike pride
"This song had me smiling the whole video. Fire."

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48. Kiel Tewarie
"Their style reminds me of Outkast.. strong lyrics, creative video and straight up addictive tune.

Blessings brothers and sisters πŸ™❤"

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49. Siphiwe Albie
"wait! picture a "SAMM HENSHAW x CHANCE THE RAPPER" album."

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REPLY
50. Mohit Rao
"Chance the Rapper on this beat would KILL !!"

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51. lialiakicks
"0:00 - 0:50 SO FREAKING RELATABLE
0:51 ~ My church from my childhood didn’t have jammin music like this 😞"

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52. Velani Mpofu
"Dear Comment Reader


Wake up and get yourself to church


kind regards


me"

**
52. rooster700rr
"I dont care who u r or who u pray 2. If everyone had this kind of enthusiasm, motivation and love. then the world would be a much better place."

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THE DISCUSSION THREAD FOR SAMM HENSHAW - CHURCH (Lyric Video) ft. EARTHGANG
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHIN2JRSMuU
(I've added numbers for referencing purposes only. All of these comments are from January 18, 2019 to June 15, 2019. Explanations for African American Vernacular English terms that are found in some of these comments are given after those comments.)

1. Keanu Basson
"Mah man just dropped another piece of Gold
imma be jammin on this for the next few weeks :D"

**
2. SeamusHutchensMusic
"Samm is killing it with these songs and videos. Love everything about it."
-snip-
"killing it" - doing something exceptionally well

**
3. GroovyBearTV
"Samm back with another dope ass song πŸ”₯πŸ”₯"
-snip-
"dope" very good
"ass" - in the context of this comment, the word "ass" merely adds more "hipness" to the adjective that comes before it

**
4. TEST UNIT MERZ
"this is the perfect motivation song wow

infectious and super bubbly πŸ’“"

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5. J Porter
"earthgang...the love children of outcast, and the ying yang twins"

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6. le be ca
"Wake up wake up Nation
Stop sleeping on this masterpiece"

**
7. Santibanez
"Is this christian"

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REPLY
8. lilyclarkson
"Santibanez yes it is but not entirely, if you’re not actually a christian yourself i’m sure you can just enjoy the happy vibes :)"

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REPLY
9. lil urmom
"It’s more catered towards Christians but also includes parts saying if you don’t believe in Christ, as long as what you believe in helps you get through life, then it’s good"

**
10. Rassmey Sopheavy
Literally my parents every Sunday

**
REPLY
11. Giles Peterson
"Rassmey Sopheavy Man I feel you"
-snip-
"I feel you" - means basically the same thing as "I agree with you" and "I hear what you are saying"
Read the comment given as #16 below for an older African American Vernacular English way of saying the same thing.

**
REPLY
12. TinyBella Ava
"Same about my mom"

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13. dayoungsta94
"This the new Sunday wake up anthem now πŸ™ŒπŸΏ"

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14. trish
"I LOVEEEE THIS πŸ˜‚ dat chorus is literally my mom every sunday morning πŸ˜‚"

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REPLY
15. Michael Andrew
"That clapping ain’t there just for sound affects, that’s how Nigerian mums wake you up for church on a Sunday morning."

**
REPLY
16. Tobenna orji
"word! brother"
-snip-
"Word!" is a late 1980s African American Vernacular English term that means that you agree with what has just been said. This word is only rarely used since the 1990s by African Americans. Click https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/218351/what-does-the-expression-word-mean for more information about the slang use of "Word!"

**
REPLY
17. bunmi oyedeji
"you really just described my life"

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REPLY
18. DGConner z
"Lmao I thought the same thing but my fam is Caribbean"

**
REPLY
19. El TigrΓ©
"Kenyan mums too"

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REPLY
20. Julie Alcin
"Black mothersπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚"

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REPLY
21. Julie Jean-Mary
"Haitian mother's too lol"

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REPLY
22. Sanmi Aina
"For Real!!!!!! BRO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1"

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REPLY
23. MaxStar McDonald
"venezuelan mamas too"

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REPLY
24. Julie Jean-Mary
"@Jade Duckervil lolol yess exactly! with the clap and all lolol"

**
REPLY
25. Mayoo
"Factss"

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REPLY
26. Chris Sutton
"Biafra"

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REPLY
27. Joshua Wargo
"See its little things like that that make me TRULY love music."

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REPLY
28. Aesthetic Dolphin
"GahhhπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ black moms"

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REPLY
29. 9 9 9
"“[insert name] o le dide”
I don’t know Yoruba but I understand it cuz it’s routinely thrown at me, I’ll be sure to edit when I remember the exact phase when it’s fresh in my head"

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REPLY
30. Aesthetic Dolphin
"@9 9 9 yesss. Or "e de dide" lol yoruba mothers can be dramatic with waking us up for church. The fathers will be else where saying "i will leave you and go" lol"
-snip-
Google translate from Yoruba to English:
"e de dide" = "to get up"

****
REPLY
31. kalia
"and liberian moms!!"

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REPLY
32. Joseph Amaran
"Na everyday saf no be only on Sunday o"
-snip-
Nigerian Pidgin English to standard English - It's not just on Sunday in particular, it's every day [that Nigerian mothers wake their children up this way]

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REPLY
33. Tewogbola Favour
"Joseph Amaran Omo my parents dey America. I dey Naija. I dey free from all that stress. I can't kill my self"
-snip-
I think these sentences with Nigerian Pidgin English mean [in standard English] "Joseph Amaran, friend, my parents are in America and I'm in Nigeria. I'm free from all that stress. I can't kill my self [to wake up on Sunday to go to church] [?]

REPLY
34. MCMXCVI - MMXIX
"And Sierra Leonean parents too!"

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REPLY
35. NateBigBawlz
"That's awesome πŸ‘"

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REPLY
36. Michael Newton
"Michael Andrew wAkE uP wAkE"

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REPLY
37. Zane Bobbey
"Michael Andrew fax"
-snip-
"fax" - a hip way of writing the word "facts", meaning "What you just said is true".

****
This concludes Part II of this two part pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.



Samm Henshaw featuring EarthGang - Church (official YouTube Video with Lyrics)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a two part pancocojams series about Black British singer Samm Henshaw's song "Church" featuring the African American Hip Hop duo EarthGang.

Part I showcases the official YouTube video of the song "Church" by Samm Henshaw featuring EarthGang.

Information about Samm Henshaw is also included in this post along with information about EarthGang.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/06/selected-comments-from-two-youtube.html for Part II of this series. Part II presents selected comments from the discussion thread of the official video of Samm Henshaw's song "Church" featuring EarthGang as well as selected comments from the YouTube lyric video for that song.

This content is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owner.

Thanks to Samm Henshaw and thanks to EarthGang for their musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are featured in this video and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT SAMM HENSHAW
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samm_Henshaw.
"Born 22 February 1994 (age 25)
London, England, UK
Genres: Soul, R&B, Pop
Occupation(s): Singer, songwriter, producer

Iniabasi Samuel Henshaw, professionally known as Samm Henshaw (born 22 February 1994), is a singer,[2] songwriter, and record producer, signed to Columbia Records.[3] Henshaw has garnered mainstream radio support from BBC Radio 1[4] and was handpicked by James Bay and Chance the Rapper for tour support.[5]

Early life
Henshaw was born in London, England and was raised by Nigerian parents in South London."...

****
INFORMATION ABOUT EARTHGANG
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EarthGang
"EarthGang (stylized EARTHGANG) is an American hip hop duo from Atlanta, Georgia, composed of Atlanta-based rappers, known by their stage names, Johnny Venus and Doctur Dot.[1][2][3]

[...]

Formed in 2008, EarthGang released their first EP, The Better Party, in 2010. This was followed by several singles and two mixtapes, Mad Men and Good News in 2011. In 2013, the duo released their debut album Shallow Graves For Toys and was largely well-received, with Noisey calling it "one of the most well thought-out releases of the year" and praising the album's "playful delivery and biting lyricism."[5] ... After signing to J. Cole's Dreamville Records, EarthGang released a trilogy of EP's: Rags, Robots, and Royalty, leading up to their third album, Mirrorland.[7]"...

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: Samm Henshaw - Church (Official Video) ft. EARTHGANG



Samm Henshaw, Published on Feb 5, 2019
-snip-
Statistics for this video as of June 16, 2019 at 10:40 AM
Total number of views - 5,035,300
Total number of likes - 157,000
Total number of dislikes - 1,600
Total number of comments- 2,824

****
SONG LYRICS - CHURCH
(Samm Henshaw & EarthGang)

Samm:
Mama said we in the church
You best believe this aint no hotel
Rocking your halo like a snapback
Cos you hang with ghetto angels
She told me they won’t catch you
When you fall
You know this aint gon end well
Heard somebody shot the sheriff
If its you i aint gon pay bail

She says
Good morning
Wake up wake
Good morning
Wake up wake
Good morning
Wake up wake
Wake up wake

Wake up and get yourself to church
Yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah
Wake up and get yourself to church
Yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah
Wake up wake up wish i could hear you right now
Somebody come and tell this lady cool down
Wake up and get yourself to church
Yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah

Poppa said to be a man
Best keep your word until the final days
Said if you sign up you’ll be covered
See my church don’t take no holidays
He said i’ll drop my anchor in the storm
Until your tears leave the waves
Don’t walk these streets looking for beef
Cos hells an oven with a cold flame

She says
Good morning
Wake up wake
Good morning
Wake up wake
Good morning
Wake up wake
Wake up wake

Wake up and get yourself to church
Yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah
Wake up and get yourself to church
Yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah
Wake up wake up wish i could hear you right now
Somebody come and tell this lady cool down
Wake up and get yourself to church
Yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah

Doc:
Granny told me when you get ya blessings
Church want 10 percent
They had ya back when you was down
Dont forget
Hold up wait
Holy Ghost bullet ricochet
Took some time to pray
When im in the streets today
Make the devil stay awaaaaay
Aint gotta fake
But you blockin all ya blessings when you lying bout ya age
I can feel the spirit moving
When im lighting up the stage
Who listening when u pray it just depend on your taste

Venus:
Tell me where you running
When that Kitty ain't as warm as it was
I don't care who you praying to
I just pray you believe in you
See what you seek is underneath
That kingdom coming make them scream
Amen from the congregation
I need a spray tan for my Jesus
And when they ask me where I'm headed, hell or heaven,
Seat belts fastening straight to Mars, Look at God!

Samm:
She says
Good morning
Wake up wake
Good morning
Wake up wake
Good morning
She says good morning
Wake up wake
Wake up

Wake up and get yourself to church
Yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah
(I don’t want to wake up)
Wake up and get yourself to church
Yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah
(I don’t want to wake up)
Wake up wake up wish i could hear you right now
Somebody come and tell this lady cool down
Wake up and get yourself to church
Yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah

****
This concludes Part I of this two part pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Saturday, June 15, 2019

Discussion About Racial Identity In The Melanated Files (YouTube Channel) Episode Featuring Tiffany (An African American Who Was Born & Raised In Japan)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases an episode of a YouTube series called The Melanated Files which features an interview with Tiffany, a Black American citizen who was born and raised in Japan.

Selected comments from this video's discussion are also included in this post. Many of these comments focus on how some non-African Americans disagree with or resent what they characterize as African Americans' race consciousness and the attitudes and/or actions that they allege that race consciousness causes.

The content of this post is presented for socio-cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Tiffany and all those who are associated with The Melanated Files. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post.
-snip-
Click https://www.cbsnews.com/news/meet-ariana-miyamoto-first-biracial-miss-universe-japan/ for a closely related 2015 article about Ariana Miyamoto, the first mixed racial Japanese crowned Miss Universe Japan. The article's title is "Beauty queen brings light to Japan's racial issues".

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: "I'm Culturally Japanese ..." (Black in Japan) | MFiles



The Black Experience Japan, Published on Mar 29, 2019

In this episode of The Melanated Files (MFiles) we introduce Tiffany, an American citizen who was born and raised in Japan. Not only is Tiffany culturally Japanese, but her native language is also Japanese. Watch as she shares her experience living in Japan without knowing she was black and the identity crisis she faced when she moved to America for six years. Watch to hear her story.

You can find Tiffany on Instagram here: @tiffrichx

[...]

The Melanated Files or the MFiles is a Black Experience in Japan's series that highlights black people from diverse countries across the globe. It focuses on sharing the story of the individual; who they are; what they do; what they are passionate about; and what their experience has been so far, as a black person living in a foreign land.

Melanated is a word that is regularly used in the black community. It means “full of melanin.” Files is in reference to the collection of stories of black people that will be shared in this series.

If you would like to be featured or know a black person living in Japan or another foreign land, who would like to be featured, please send us a message on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/theblackexjp/ Or tweet or DM us @theblackexjp

Visit our website: https://www.blackexjp.com

Also remember to subscribe for weekly videos on the black experience across the globe.
-snip-
Statistics: as of June 14, 2019 at 9:34 PM
Total number of views - 692,693
Total likes - 20,000
Total dislikes - 622
Total comments - 4,602

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS VIDEO'S DISCUSSION THREADS
Pancocojams Editor's Note:
This is a very small sampling of the comments from this video's discussion thread. The comments given as #1-#4 are selected from one sub-thread and the comments from #5 to #75 are selected from another very long sub-thread.

I recommend that you read the entire discussion thread or at least more of the discussion than these selected comments.

All of the comments in this pancocojams compilation were published between Mar 29, 2019 and June 14, 2019. Numbers are added for referencing purposes only.

1. salih morta
"man i really feel bad for this girl, america confused her so much knowing history is one thing but the whole im more black than you thats just Hate mentality its shameful:

**
REPLY
2. SOCO TROCO
"you got the point; race, as it is framed, goes beyond your looks, is in the cultural thing, the way you talk, the music/sports, hobbies and I don't know if they are socially created: What if black (American) person likes rock instead of rap, talks with a standard accent, likes ice hockey instead of basketball and is more world -concerned than centered only in black American issues?"

**
REPLY
3. Bill Clark
"@SOCO TROCO There are some Black Americans like that and people still view them as Black. Black is all appearance based. One guy could be half Black and have White features + skin and people may treat him as if he is white. One lady could be 60% White but if she has a wider nose, kinky hair, and big lips then she may be considered Black."

**
REPLY
4. Stan Johnson
"That was pretty neat. I’m half Okinawan and black and can relate to a lot of that video. She did a great job articulating that. I have a lot of the same feelings and can’t put them all into words."

**
5. Bee Bee
"I honestly think Americans need to remember that not every black person around the world identifies with black American culture or the struggles that people face in America. Even black Canadians may have a different experience despite also being in North America. I'm afro-latina and I only realized all these concepts about cultural appropriation etc. because of the internet when I was like in my mid-20's. Sometimes I feel like the african-American experience is the one speaking for us all because of the media that's being exported all around the world, when in fact, black people have so many different cultures depending where we were born in the world. Even worse are the stereotypes portrayed by the media."

**
REPLY
6. Shantel Caynes
"Bee Bee omg so true! I’m a black Canadian and I pretty much learned about cultural appropriation, racism, police brutality and the black American experience from TV/social media. Now a days I think a lot of black Canadians can relate more easily to black Americans because of social media but when I was growing up in the late 90’s/early 2000’s I basically had only Tv shows and movies to learn about the black American experience. And also they prioritized on teaching native/aboriginal history in Canadian elementary schools over black history so I learned about slavery later than the average black Americans"

**
REPLY
7. Moni Muppet
"Careful with that. Every Black American doesn't have the same experience either. If you run too far with the idea that America is the center for racial identity issues, you may be ignoring the feelings of someone right next to you. Racism didn't start in the U.S. and it certainly hasn't been cured in every country that isn't the U.S."

**
REPLY
8. B Kuo
"Thank you. Even the fact that "black" is used so carelessly when it denotes internalized colonialism..."

**
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9. R T
"I’m Haitian American, born & raised in the US; but since I was raised by Haitian immigrants who taught me the language & culture & we lived in a diverse community with a decent Haitian population, I identify more with my culture than African Americans. I also feel like I have a different experience as a 1st generation American & I‘ve always wished that we could have more representation of that, & just more representation for Caribbeans in general. I wish the media would be truly honest about diversity, because too many people don’t have a space or don’t have representation for them."

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10. Kry Kry
"Literally black Americans are actually only the tiniest percentage all things considered of the rest of black community. Majority are all around the world....in Africa, Caribbean's, islands etc even in Asia, Europe I've met them and most of them do not identify with African American culture.

Edit: I do want to point out obviously many are influenced by the media and a lot probably do like aspects of African American culture and the music and style but it's not the same as truly being immersed in it. There are cultural differences especially if you consider tribes in Africa. Comparing Somalians and African Americans are like night and day. Somalians are extremely conservative and religious"

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11. wekselbaum
"@B Kuo "Black" as an ethnic descriptor gained popularity in the 70's as a way to distance African Americans from the stereotypes, internalized racism, and attitudes that stemmed from our oppression. It is a term that was flipped to instill a sense of pride instead of being used to demean people of African descent in America. If you're going to get on here at least know what you're talking about."

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12. wekselbaum
"@Shantel Caynes You didn't learn about Black Canadian history? This is so sad."

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13. Shantel Caynes
"wekselbaum they didn’t teach it in great detail, like they glossed over it. It also differs from province to province.
Also I wouldn’t say a lot of Canadians have self hate issues but just didn’t have the exact experience as Black Americans. Of course Canada is not perfect and there is racism here too. In my area it would seem that most of the black people I interact with are first generation Canadians with immigrant parents from Africa or the Caribbean area, so we all had to learn about black history in school from the beginning cuz our parents didn’t live through it.
I swear I first heard about black history from the cartoon The Proud Family before they taught it to me in school haha. Maybe they’re teaching it differently now but I don’t know.
It’s always cool to hear different peoples perspective on race!"

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14. Hwasa
"@B Kuo ...thats what we are?? Black. We're not African-American. That's offensive to actual African people who came to America. Yes our Ancestors are from Africa but thats what differentiates us. We are Black Americans."

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15. Onel E Riveron
"The part of all this that pisses me off is how hard African Americans are trying to ship and export to other countries and societies all these issues, concepts, and mentalities. Just look here in YouTube and you will find many videos of African Americans wanting to go to Cuba or actually going to Cuba to talk about black pride and the black struggle and all that other stuff that pertains only to African American culture. I use Cuba as an example because I'm Cuban and I have made my personal battle to fight off the introduction of such things into Cuban society. Like Bee Bee said, black people have many different cultures depending where they are born and in Cuba they have the Cuban identity that every Cuban has and that is it. No such nonsense in Cuba as being Afro Cuban or Euro Cuban or whatever other stupid denomination people come up with."

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16. Siramad Backwards
"I am tired of other foreign blacks attempting to say the black Americans are trying to speak for you we do not speak for you we specifically understand that we are American and on top of that we are American which gives us hyper visibility in the media because of course we’re. America which is a high powered country. We are not attempting to say the other blacks don’t experience things or lives are not different I think this assumption of our ignorance is xenophobia masquerading is attempting to educate black Americans as if we don’t know that our experiences are different."

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17. Siramad Backwards
"Onel E Riveron The black pride movement that was started in the 60s and 70s was not due to black Americans traveling anywhere. a lot of people are watching what we do in copying what we do in terms of the cultural shift and taking pride in your appearance has nothing to do a black people attempting to co-op went to the black empowerment movement."

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18. Jimmy Sakura Gakuin Fan
"Onel E Riveron If you are happy with yourself sir? It really should not matter what others are trying to identify with. Black people that want to go to other countries from America. They are looking for an escape from the one sided thinking so many black people have in America. Maybe you should try and Except the people that want to embrace your country and culture. Instead of pushing them away?"

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19. Wicked Minish
"part african and born and raised in Norway here, And seeing the odd mindsets of many of the american ''black people'' as they call themselves, How they're stuck in this backwards mindset, Not all of them, tons are not. They don't really realise that all these idenity politics, blm, what goes on in universities, the news whatever it is can affect. Part of a reason i'm a bit wary of travelling out into the world to places like america, that people will be like ''Oh look at that guy must have voted for this and that'' etc. So much judging, Don't want to be seen as some minority that just succeeded because they gave free jobs etc. black people or whatever. I was never discriminated against here, Nor did people suddenly have to learn not to discriminate or all that cultural appropriation mess.

In Norway we don't really say black people and all that either, We just say ''I come from here, my family comes from here, growing up here people are just fine''
I'm not a writer and it is late

It is refreshing to see that not everyone thinks or has anything to with it besides slightly looking the same"

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20. mrsoready
"@Onel E Riveron So, are you telling me that there hasn't been ANY issues in Cuba with racism or colorism? I am truly shocked and glad to hear that if true. That still would be somewhat unique. Places like the Dominican Republic has had issues with that, and HaΓ―tiens have been on the receiving end of that. I would think that, with a similar history, similar problems."

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21. Jolanda Edwards
"I always hate when people say black culture. There is no one black culture. When they say black culture they often mean the African American experience. it's really annoying when people expect you to be like an African American but I don't even know what that would mean."

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22. Elena Lina
...Black people in Scandinavia are usually very different from black Americans or even Africans in that they work hard and assimilate.

They don’t usually carry the victim mentality. As a POC from Iceland, it’s very highly ironic, that living in one of the most white countries in the world, I haven’t had any experience with racism and discrimination, as opposed to the one I had in Southern California by Hispanic people. America which is apparently a very “diverse” nation.

I live in a 95% white country and I’m very happy where I am. I’m very happy with this culture, and with these people. I don’t like black Americans saying all white countries are even colonising conspiracy theorists. It doesn’t sit well, because my family came and worked hard in Iceland. They don’t blame anyone for anything and they’re thankful for the life we have in this country.

People think I’m somehow very “different” and black people of course call me “whitewashed” ( because being educated and well spoken is apparently a “white” thing, sometimes I wonder who the real racist is )."

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23. iammilorex
"@Linda Tinah TV I think it depends on the colonial experience that happened in your country. South Africans can relate to a lot of African American issues because of Apartheid."

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24. Linda Tinah TV
"1 month ago
@iammilorex Also true. So in short, let's not categorize black people as one general group."

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25. R T
". Well then we’re not really the same because we have different cultures & languages, hence why we have names to differentiate between the cultures lol. My experience & culture is entirely different than most of my Afro American friends. So yeah we are the same race & come from the same ancestors, but we are very different."

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26. Troy Bradley
"Africans Are Everywhere ♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️

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27. wekselbaum
"Shantel Caynes I think you misunderstood me. I don't think a lot of Canadians have self hate issues. I think a lot of the people who posted comments on this video have self hate issues."

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28. wekselbaum
"Elena Lina I don't speak for black people in the world or America. I speak for myself. This girl is African American and seems to have no knowledge or respect for her culture and history and I find that sad. What that has to do with black people in Iceland....I'm not sure."

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29. wekselbaum
"heyitsrosie You can't hear the volume of my voice on the internet Rosie. I can read and comprehend what everyone's written. If I disagree, I'm going to respond. People see this gwoman as aspirational. When to me, it's not a negative to learn your history or acknowledge your cultural heritage. The fact that she was bullied because she didn't fit into a niche view of what it meant to be black is sad but, a lot of black people deal with that because of white supremacy. No one fits into being "black" because that doesn't mean anything. Which is what I would want this woman to understand. She is ethnically and can be culturally Black/African American because any AA/Black person can be culturally Black/African American. We are a vast people who do not all act the same. See how I used those words interchangeabley because they can but don't always mean the same thing? It is very sad that she feels like she can't identify as an African American because she doesn't "fit in". If she wants to immigrate to Japan by all means go ahead. An Ex-African American man on this channel did that and more power to him."

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30. wekselbaum
"Elena Lina Also the "dumb self absorbed American" stereotype you're trying to pin on me? Don't. You will not find me speaking on any black people except African Americans (and Canadians only to defend that racism does happen in Canada and other places besides the U.S.) in my comments. I know what a map is and where to find countries. Not all Americans are stupid and hopefully not all Icelandic people are condescending pricks."

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31. wekselbaum
"Wicked Minish Wicked Minish I expect you to have no say because you're Norwegian. What you wrote about American racial politics was mostly illegible. Identity politics are fundamental to American politics. You seem to have a limited view on American politics and are comparing it to Norway. We're not like Norway.

Our history is not Norway's. Therefore why would our political climate and racial politics in any way resemble Norway's?

So, what you said about America's racial politics doesn't matter to me and also is pointless. I wouldn't post a comment about Norway's racial politics because I don't live there. Unless you have first-hand experience it's very rude of you to allude to cultural appropriation and identy politics as "mess" and things that Black/African Americans waste their time with.

This entire thread is filled with people claiming that Black Americans expect the world to operate like America. Some do, but not all.

You should take your own advice and not pretend like America is going to have the same political climate as Norway. You wouldn't understand it, because you're not American. If you actually studied American history you'd know these things."

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32. Onel E Riveron
"@mrsoready No I'm not saying that and I apologize if I wasn't very clear. Of course there is going to be racism in Cuba. There is racism everywhere. If you think a perfect society or country exists where there is no racism or other social issues, then please come down from whatever trip you're on."

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33. Ebony Eyes
"@Jimmy Sakura Gakuin Fan I really want to know what obsession your talking about. As A Black Asian I see there are many Asians that obsess over Black American culture especially dance and Hip Hop."

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34. Onel E Riveron
"@Jimmy Sakura Gakuin Fan
Jimmy I have no problem with embracing them, none whatsoever. The only thing I have an issue with is them trying to promote, introduce, and bring about the so called "black identity" or "black pride" mentality into Cuban society. Also when they start talking about Cuba as if they knew anything about the damn country and its people, or as if injecting such things into Cuban society would be a good thing.

I'd be more than happy to welcome them and help them learn how these things work in Cuba. But rather than wanting to immerse themselves in Cuban culture to learn about a country where black citizens, white citizens, Asian and middle eastern descendant citizens identify as one thing which is CUBAN, they instead want to immerse in it simply to introduce the same ideals, same color oriented bullshit that you see in the US. So my deal is, why the fuck?? I mean, if you're wanting to do something good for your "black brethren" then go to Cuba and instead of taking over there all the racial nonsense that we have here in the states, go there and learn the stuff that you could take over to the states. (I live in the US and know the culture inside out).

I hope I made my point of view understandable and didn't rant too much."

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35. Maeve Franklin
"I think that people need to remember the african american experience isn’t monolithic either. I don’t even really consider myself African American. I’m Caribbean American but people still call me African American because the idea that my culture comes from somewhere else never occurs to them. Also African Americans aren’t necessarily the ones proliferating the message that our experience is the only experience more so that American media is spread everywhere and everyone assumes that everyone’s experience is like African Americans because it’s the one they see and hear about the most. Americans don’t even really consider the diversity of experience and culture within the African American community."

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36. 78755477 78755477
"I’m Black African (Ghana) born and raised in Australia. I’ve been immersed in a completely different culture from the African American experience growing up."

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37. Madesobe
"Fully share that sentiment, and it's quite annoying. I had my first (and pretty much only) racial discrimination experience when I was 20, interning in the US/California, in conversation with a few young black guys who were trying to pick me up. Because I didn't speak like them and to them seemed, as many Black Americans say, 'too white', that seemed to offend them. Well I was born and raised in Canada, from educated African parents, and my experience is that of a person that doesn't limit themselves to or focus on skin colour. My identity is crafted by factors beyond that."

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38. MrsCurioCheerio
"Siramad Backwards I’ve seen plenty of people try to generalize and lump the mentalities of those belonging to certain races, ethnicities, or nationalities together as a whole. It happens, and as an American I do see it happening more so with people from the US. The OP’s comment is generalizing as well, but I doubt they literally meant every African-American is doing this, just some people don’t seem to acknowledge that other regions don’t have the same social issues/mindset"

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39. Yona Avraham
"@Kry Kry
I don't believe that! The entire world identifies with African American culture!
I live overseas in a country with a very small amount of African Americans and the youth is in love with rap,hip hop and the swag of African Americans.
There are many other black people all over the world,but African American culture has more influence than any other black culture.That is simply the truth."

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40. Nakia Howe
"So basically you all are angry with African Americans for having the dominate culture shown on television or in the media? We have very little ownership of the media. We probably get more opportunities to expose our issues due to being from America. My husband is from Ghana. He watches Ghanaian movies. I don’t get offended there are no black Americans in the movies he watches. Stop being angry with us and express what you want to express about your culture. You all have access to the internet right? Make a YouTube channel."

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41. Nakia Howe
"Elena Lima are you African American? How do you know we don’t work hard to assimilate. We were forced to assimilate for hundreds of years. If you have not lived in America you have no right to pretend you know our experience. Racism in America is different than in Iceland."

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42. MrsCurioCheerio
"Nakia Howe That’s not what they were expressing at all. It’s the idea that some people forget or don’t acknowledge that there are other social issues, norms, etc. outside of America and attach them onto other people in other regions and make it seem like all/most people from certain races are homogenous in the way that they think about issues. Their comment was generalizing but I’m just explaining that’s what they were getting at"

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43. Expat Teacher
"@R T so true! I am Aruban and immigrated to the Florida as a young child. I lived in an immigrant community and then later in a predominantly white part of my town. I wasn't really exposed to black american culture until I moved to uni in NC. It was such a culture shock for me since Black americans just didn't understand why i had friends with other international students. I was sadly mocked and called oreo by black americans since i didn't "know" about the black american life"

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44. Stephen Sullivan
"@Onel E Riveron I live in Brazil and I'm a Black American, I have been here for 6 years and I speak Spanish and Portuguese fluently and I have been exposed to people from many other Latin American countries as well. My wife is a Black Brazilian woman and the mentality here is different. I agree with you 100%, so don't think that we all think the same. In my opinion I think Black Americans who come to Latin America should come with an open mind and leave all the racial baggage from the USA at customs. While, Latin American countries may have their issues with discrimination, the cultural nuances and context is much different in Latin America than in the USA. In my opinion race relations are quite good where I live in Brazil despite other problems in the country. I however know a few Black Americans down here trying to be social justice warriors and activist and I hate that so much, because it could cause us to be viewed as trouble makers, causing us to be seen as unwelcome here. As a Black American I feel welcomed and accepted in Brazil and Brazilians are hospitable, but the typical mentality of Black Americans could definitely undermine this by making every misunderstanding a racial issue."

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45. Stephen Sullivan
"@mrsoready Well, I don't think he saying there "isn't any issues with racism or colorism" in Cuba even though his comment appears to be alluding to such a notion. Haiti and Dominican Republic have historical bad blood because Haiti forcefully occupied DR for 22 years in the 19th century and killed a lot of Dominicans. There may be issues in these countries evolving discrimination , but in my opinion and what I think Onel E Riveron is trying to say is that it's not the place of African Americans to fan the flames of racial tension in Latin American countries or engage in activism here. I live in Brazil and I agree with what he is essentially saying."

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46. Thomas
"wekselbaum It isn’t fair to say it’s a shame Tiffany doesn’t understand her history. She’s culturally Japanese, and no one needs to be connected to their heritage, so if she doesn’t really feel a connection to the foreign culture, it doesn’t matter. “Her history” is [presumably] Japanese history, since it is the history of her homeland and culture."

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47. Thomas
"Additionally, I think that accusing people of self-hatred and whatnot is sorta you forcing your American view of racism (and by extension your view of being black) on others. The idea of extreme, extensive awareness and education of racism (not saying it’s bad btw) is primary American and was spawned primary in response to the experiences of African Americans. So by spreading this belief, you are spreading an American way of thinking, which you might not of realized. For people who clash with this mindset, it could be a cultural clash, not a self-hating one."

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48. BraveStarEric
"Kry Kry well, African American culture is not created of its own. It’s a byproduct of the unique circumstances of living under severe oppression of the white American. So the rest of the diaspora doesn’t understand because of the varying cultures they themselves are raise from within. Seriously, white people and Japanese people are completely different. So growing up In those respective cultures will create varying results. But, I understand that foreigners are not being taught of the historically peculiar environment of the United States. ALOT has happened here. Also, don’t forget that no other nation benefited more from the slave and sex trafficking trade than the United States. Which why over the past 400 years America is one of the most powerful countries in the world! Which is the reason why many of you all across the world aspire to come here. All built upon the backs of the black African Americans who are a big part of America’s unique democracy, literally creating ripple effects throughout the whole world. It is much more to the African American than the Black propaganda on tv and movies, seriously. American Blacks have always played a very important role in the revolution of the world into the way the world is today, and deserves a lot more credit than which is given. Do some actual research on world history versus listening to propaganda. Thank you."

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49. Stephen Sullivan
"@BraveStarEric Your comment is the exact reason why other groups of people are annoyed by African Americans or don't take us African Americans very seriously and see us as narcissistic. Everything is all about us as if nothing bad happened to other people's ancestors and we seem to always wallow in self pitty. African Americans keep saying that slavery single handedly made the USA rich and powerful, and that notion is so absurd. Where is the concrete evidence of this?? If that were the case then Brazil should be way more powerful being as though they had way more slaves. The USA gained power due to its imperialistic nature and being able to develop one of the most powerful militaries in the world. The country wasn't single handedly built by African American slaves either. Many of our problems in the Black community today are mostly due to our degenerate behavior as a whole, lack of family structure, work ethic, education, values and our inability to work together and foreigners see this and steer clear of us, I can't say I blame them. Yes, our history is tragic but the truth is no one owes us anything and if we had that mindset, we'd do a lot more for ourselves."

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50. mrsoready
"@Stephen Sullivan I do truly appreciate your comment and it is refreshing to talk to someone who can truly add a little more knowledge to me and to others. You are probably right in your interpretation and as an African-American/Haitian Family, I can see both sides, maybe a little better than some. Yet, being raised here in the states and the particular state I grew up in(Mississippi) may have colored some of my perceptions. I do see the U.S. as a great place in many areas, just not in the historical and even recent way it treats minorities. I think that has created this anger and culture of blackness in the states that, in our anger and indignation we have sent out to the world of the black diaspora. I know, no other place on earth has the same level of racial inequality as the U.S. has(I would say South Africa did). I have met more issues with just being an American( as the stereotype says that we are arrogant and uncultured) ,until I engaged a person in meaningful conversation or in French or Spanish to show that I came to enjoy/learn/appreciate your country, than being black from the states in other countries. This piece is truly an eye opener for the blacks in the states, but I would add that this is also a call to those who enjoyed missing out on being black in America, that since we can't ever reclaim what was lost. We can't enjoy our country just accepting us, as many of you have stated, that you are of the country first, then whatever skin tone(if that) and that those countries in South America, the Caribbean and others still retain certain cultural aspects the American blacks weren't allowed to keep as strongly."

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51. mrsoready
"@Stephen Sullivan By the way, what is it like in Brazil, what contrasts with this subject have you seen with the States? What similarities? Didn't Brazil end slavery later than the U.S.? Besides movies like [City of God], which may have shown some issues, I don't know much if Brazil. I think that Brazilians embrace all their parent cultures better than the U.S., I believe that with so many Brazilians of mixed origin, problems of race would be low. Again, just opinions, but no real knowledge. Share anything you can."

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52. Stephen Sullivan
"@mrsoready I think although racism does exist in Brazil, it is not as much at the forefront while much more emphasis is placed on social or economic class within the Brazilian social stratification. If you have money or are upper/middle class you are viewed a someone who is more respectable, but if you are extremely poor, you are viewed as someone who is uneducated, untrustworthy, a burden on society or not very "refined or unambitious and are treated accordingly. Classicism is more prevalent in Brazil. Overall, on the service people appear to get along much much more than in the USA and from my experience I say race relations are much better where I live in Brazil than in the USA by far. Here I don't feel the same tension in the air as I did in the USA and in Brazil you can relax a little more and living by beautiful beaches here in Bahia with a relatively pleasant climate, does a lot to just chill people out.


People here appear to be much more lively and happy, even those who are poor and Black people here ( and many other non-Blacks) struggle and are poor, but they don't seem to walk around with the same hostile demeanor or "chip on their shoulder" like SOME African Americans do and Black Brazilians tend to be more sociable and will mingle with people across racial lines, they are more attached to their culture and national identity. A Brazilian is a Brazilian to them a gringo is a gringo (foreigner). Even African Americans here are gringos in their eyes, they don't adhere to the notion here of "we are both black, so we should be the same or think the same" which is an idea that African Americans usually adopt.

Black Brazilians are friendly, hospitable and will partake in cultural exchange with foreigners, but at the end of the day, they have much more of an affinity towards their country and countrymen despite the issues or problems they may face in their country and that is something that African Americans may seem to find hard to understand being as though African Americans often assume an anti-USA political stance, and don't really identify themselves with the US national identity and they erroneously assume that other Blacks in the Americas should feel the same way about their countries. Brazilians will complain to no end about their government, but I think they really embrace their cultures and their people across color lines much more. In Brazil there's no concept of "this is how you act if you are black and this is how you act when you are white." When I'm on the phone with a Brazilian I can't tell if they are Black or White being as though they will have the same accent within the region they are from while in the USA there's this idea of "sounding Black or White" which I freaking hate. In Brazil all colors of people listen to the same Brazilian music genres. My wife is Black and listens to ForrΓ³, which uses the accordion a lot. I bet if African Americans were to hear her listening to that in the states they would look at her like "hey ain't you black, why ain't you listening to R&B or Rap"?Without even considering the possibility that she is from a Latin American country."

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53. mrsoready
"@Stephen Sullivan Thanks for that, I have a trip planned for October to Brazil. It is great to know some more info on Brazil and her people."

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54. Moni Muppet
"One last thing to everyone before I abandon this horrendous thread. If you're upset about the the Black American experience overshadowing your own, you know full well who to bring your complaints to; yourself. Stop consuming the things that come out of the Black Americans culture. Ignore us. Don't listen to our music, don't use our slang, stop watching dramas, comedies, and movies about us. Black Americans did not come knocking at your doors with our culture and experience, did we? We didn't ask for your attention and we sure as hell aren't going to apologize now that you've given it. We live our lives. Live yours. Also, I don't care how awesome and inclusive you think your country is. I've been many places on this planet and there are bigots everywhere. There exists no racial utopia, get over yourselves."

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55. mrsoready
"@Stephen Sullivan Due to our talk earlier, I started looking up some details of Brazil, and it does seem great. I was sad to find a video on here though, about a young black lady who was the face of "globeza" or something like that, and once she was put on t.v. she received so many negative comments on her dark skin tone that she was let go and replaced with a mulatresse. I do see that this is not with everyone, not to many ppl(I hope) think this way, but maybe the subtle racism and colorism isn't the best. While it does allow for the day to day activities to be not so saturated with it, a mom may start telling her dark skin daughter to marry a white Brazilian instead of someone dark to better herself and her family. It may be better to see your enemies than they be hidden from you. Again, thanks for the different perspective."

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56. Stephen Sullivan
"@mrsoready Most cultures worldwide find fair skin and European features more attractive. Yes, in Brazil when it comes to dating and attractiveness, most people don't really want to be with a person who is very dark skin, especially if they themselves are not Black. To me this doesn't affect my daily life or stop me from doing anything I have to do. White Brazilians here don't disrespect me like that, I work at a chemical plant here and we respect each other. Online you'll always have trolls saying dumb stuff though. I'm not justifying what happened to Miss Globeleza, that wasn't cool."

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57. Aneesa H.
"Siramad Backwards Beautifully stated. I am a black American of Afro-Latino parents, so reading this thread is...ugh. I’ve never seen black Americans as “speaking for blacks across the world”, we are simply put on the map because we are Americans, and while we wish it weren’t this way, the focus is almost always on America and European countries.

I’ve always been aware of this issue and it has left me so conflicted and saddened. That’s why today I work in research focusing on what America calls “neglected tropical diseases”; basically meaning that the disease is not a b epidemic in America or Europe, so it’s not a priority focus on. I thought this was wrong and from a place of privilege, which is why it’s what I do; I think the takeaway is that black people ARE aware of the cultural disparities and the most we can do is educate ourselves and take action where we can.

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58. cfG21
"@wekselbaum many are stupid though a large amount. Pretty much every other culture complains about the arrogant ugly racist anerican"

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59. Kennedy Fuller
"But I don’t that’s our fault as black people in America. Segregation and stereotypes where forced on us by other people so that’s the only way we know to identify. But the media is and cultural news is disseminated by the ones who created those stereotypes so that’s how it is portrayed to the rest of the world. At times I do feel like other black people don’t think I’m less of a black person because of the way I am but for the most part I feel that black people are starting to accept that we are all different because we’re finally starting to separate ourselves from the oppression."

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60. ChloΓ© D.
"I’m black born and raised in France
My mother is congolese and my father angolan so I considered myself has a French girl having congolese and angolan heritage.
With globalization people are coming from everywhere"

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61. Mia Danielle
"@Nakia Howe Right! There's Nollywood, Ghallywood, Telenovelas etc. We're not stopping them from telling their stories but we're not gonna stop telling ours either."

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62. Ava Limpa
"@mrsoready "I think your entry was inciteful." Did you mean insightful? Incite and insight have very different meanings. You can look it up."

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63. mrsoready
"@Ava Limpa Thank you for pointing out that mistake. Insightful."

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64. Mzcheif92
"We just do our own thing, we can’t help that the rest of the world watches everything we do. Americans aren’t telling you how to be black, most Americans don’t even pay other countries any attention. If you don’t respect American culture that’s fine. Create your own music, television shows and movies"

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65. Wousoulan Daga
"Kry Kry it’s funny sometimes to hear black Americans. They are less than 40 millions while around the world they are about 1 billion « black people » or even more"

**
REPLY
66. The Grandoti
"Here we go with this sh&t* again!
1) How do you collectivize the thoughts and beliefs of 46 million black Americans, and declare us the solipsist of the African diaspora and definitively speak into existence what we believe?

2) I have lived in multiple countries around the world, and I have never, f&&king* ever, encountered any black person (Caribbean, Africa, South America, European or otherwise) who didn't, in some way, espouse the belief and exalt their culture as superior to other black cultures (especially better than black Americans), which had no problem with, because such things are subjective in beliefs.

3)If you watch black American TV or film, you are left to your cognitive devises to glean from it what you will. No one, subliminally or otherwise, tells or compels you to abdicate your culture for ours.

4) In any country you choose to live, of your free will and volition, some degree of immersive consideration is expected from you - which does not equate to someone requesting you to subordinate your culture to theirs - "When in Rome, do as the Roman's do." You don't just set up camp in Rome or Tokyo and not acknowledge those respective cultures by way cultural concessions.

5) Many of you non-black Americans really think too highly of yourselves: We don't expect you to identify with our historical struggles anymore than we do with yours.

6)Black Americans films and music are universally propagated because of the ubiquitousness of American film and TV. (Not all of our portrays are flattering) If one of your former colonizer was globally dominant, then your respective cultures would be in a similar position.

Chill with that culture narcissistic bullsh&t*. In the end, we don't care how you racially, ethnically or tribally classify yourselves.
-snip-
*This word is fully spelled out in this comment.

**
REPLY
67. ChariotManGaming
"Here we go again..This is the MAIN reason why we Black Americans are separating from all you other Blacks just for comments like this right here. But yet all you idiots trying to dress like us and talk like us. Foh son. The hell with you guys than. None of you blacks can't even count on the achievements my people did period! Stay mad✌"

**
REPLY
68. Llovelylady1
"Let’s be clear all black Americans don’t have the same experiences."

**
REPLY
69. queenbeethatme100
"If they come to America they WILL id as a black American because the dominant culture will treat them like they do every black.

I was born in and lived in England, but moving to America, I was treated just like any other black woman.

It was only as I got older, that people differentiated my blackness from native born blacks."

**
REPLY
70. queenbeethatme100
"@Ana Victoria People can never get over stuff still going on. Tell Trayvon Martin or Eric Garner's families to "move on"

No one can "move on" if the dominant society does things to keep them in their place.

THINK ."

**
REPLY
71. queenbeethatme100
"@Wicked Minish I know a black who lives in Norway and another in Denmark. Both say there is racism. It just presents differently."

**
REPLY
72. FileThis Information
"Bee Bee, I am African American, and the young lady in the video speaks about HER perceptions of African Americans based on her young age when she lived in the United States. I wrote her the comment below about how most African-American adults perceive Black people:


Your amount of MELANIN is proof that you are of African ancestry, raised in the Japanese culture, and a part of the Black diaspora. Furthermore, you have an interesting perception of what Black is in the United States. I am African American and being Black in the U.S. is not about knowing who other Blacks are and what they do or have done. Being Black is a diaspora of people who share the same ancestry (Africa) and have similar genetics. Also, Americans are race conscious due to the ignorance of Whites who undervalue Blacks. Everyone should study melanin vs albinism. USA!"

**
REPLY
73. jackson ernie
"@Elena Lina


This opinionated worldview of Black Americans is limited the same way you accuse others of sharing . The assumptions go both ways . The media has lots of people ignorant on a global scale regardless of education or indoctrination . Each traveler , student or immigrant will not have the same experiences and one person cannot speak for the many or few ."

**
REPLY
74. akrazie
"Im caribbean grew up and live in netherland but i feel connected to black people accros the world i get mad to see innocent black people get killed every where and im not in conflict thinkin im dutch. For al the black people born here they dont get recognized as dutch people so we dont want to accept it either. This girl for me she is diconeccted with her people"

**
REPLY
75. vayoha02
"πŸ™„πŸ˜’ I find it so off putting and amusing how other "African descent" ppl have to say about black, afro, African American ppl!! I, myself, am half Caribbean and American military brat so I know black culture outside of American culture and I've lived overseas, so I see many facets. I understand why some black ppl can't quite make it out. To me many of you all are just coming off judgmental. When I compare my 2 families, they're very different. My dad side is American, he went to school when it was still SEGREGATED. I don't think you all grasp the concept of if a white person FELT disrespected by black person they were hanged, shot, beaten, or thrown in jail. That only ended in 1965. The foundation of the American Constitution wasn't created for ppl of color. If you critically think: ppl in America didn't begin to truly work together until AFTER the Civil Rights mvmt. My mom's side, basically care free!! She's from Curacao. My grandparents on that side don't know ANYTHING about discrimination growing. But my gma learned when she moved to the states in the 73. As far as succeeding in America: parents need to be a positive influence in their children lives. If their having problems in a subject: get a tutor. In other words parents need to indoctrinate their children positively before society does! As far as gun violence goes refer to the 2nd amendment. The news in America does a stupendous job making Americas fearful of other ppl!!! Americans will shoot if they're scared and when they're angry. Americas foundation is racism, they should have gotten rid of it in 1865 instead of bringing it into the 1870s onwards, the snake is now a hydra.🀦🏿‍♀️
-snip-
This comment was published five hours ago [from the time of this blog post's publication] and is the last comment so far that was published in this sub-thread.

****
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Visitor comments are welcome.

Thursday, June 13, 2019

Selected Comments From The YouTube Discussion Thread For Sampa The Great's Hip Hop Video - Final Form

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part pancocojams series about Sampa the Great's song "Final Form".

Part II presents selected comments from the discussion thread of the official Sampa the Great's official YouTube music video for "Final Form".

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/06/zambian-recording-artist-sampa-great.html Part I of this series. Part I showcases the official Sampa the Great's official YouTube music video for "Final Form" and includes the lyrics to that song. [Hip Hop composition]

WARNING: This song includes two curse words. Amended spelling is used for those words in this post.

An article about Sampa The Great's song "Final Form" is also included in this post.

This content is presented for cultural and linguistic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owner.

Thanks to Sampa the Great for her musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THE DISCUSSION THREAD FOR THE OFFICIAL YOUTUBE MUSIC VIDEO OF "FINAL FORM" BY SAMPA THE GREAT
(Numbers are added for referencing purposes only. All of these comments were published between June 5, 2019 and June 13, 2019 and are given in relative chronological order. Explanations for some of terms used in these comments are given under those comments. Note that almost all of these terms that are explained below are from African American Vernacular English.) Additions and corrections are welcome for these explanations.

1. Fabio Aug.
"Thank you for reminding us of the beauty and strength in our black essence."

**
2. Rea Selepe
"Big up all my Africans πŸ’₯🀘🏾"

**
3. Nayo
"Love everything about this video! The vibe and black love πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²❤❤🌻"

**
4. Zawadi Khoza
"In the next five years, Sampa The Great will be recognised as THE greatest international female hip hop artist of all time, if not one of them. I've said it; watch it manifest.."

**
5. Katele Kalumba
"This is honestly fireπŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯😭 favorite song right now"
-snip-
"fire" = something that is (or someone who does something) very good (part of the hot, smoking, dynamite, cookin family of African American Vernacular English superlative terms)

**
6. C Ann
"Yaaasss Sampa!!!πŸ‘πŸΎπŸ‘πŸΎπŸ‘πŸΎ I been waiting on you to drop something new. You came with the πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯ #melaninpower #blackpower # blackgirlmagic. And you slayed the style!! Keep doing ya thing!!❤️❤️❤️"
-snip-
"Melanin power" is a saying that may be part of a the Melanin theory which claims that "melanin, the primary determinant of skin color in humans, is the cause of an intellectual and physical superiority of dark-skinned people and provides them with supernatural powers." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melanin_theory. Although this is a racist and pseudoscientific theory, I believe that for a number of Black people the term "melanated: is considered a contemporary referent for Black people and the phrase "melanin power" and the related saying "black girl magic" are used to assert and reinforce Black pride without considering that those terms also can & do put down non-Black people.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/05/what-does-term-melanated-mean-when-did.html for a pancocojams post entitled "What Does The Term "Melanated" Mean & When Did "Melanin" Become A Popular Referent For Black People?"

**
7. Fabio Aug.
"Thank you for reminding us of the beauty and strength in our black essence."

**
8. Nayo
"Love everything about this video! The vibe and black love πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²❤❤🌻"

**
9. MainzaJack Timba
"Proud Zambian here πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²"

**
10. Slick-One
"Straight Fire!!! πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯ Sampa stays making Zambia proud! πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²"

**
REPLY
11. iMght
"She stay making Africa proud!!!πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²"
-snip-
"She stay" = She continuously/always...

**
12. russell marcell
"CONSTRUCTIVE ALL EMPOWERINNG , BLACK POSITIVE MUSIC. SUPERB SISTER SUBERB! ..WE SALUTE YOU!! Xxxxx"

**
13. Ananda Araujo
"Girl Power! Black Power!! I love! ❤πŸ™πŸŽΆπŸ’ͺπŸ€ Congratulations for music!"

**
14. Zawadi Khoza
"In the next five years, Sampa The Great will be recognised as THE greatest international female hip hop artist of all time, if not one of them. I've said it; watch it manifest.."

**
15. True Vibenation
"DOPE! Zambia Represent :)"
-snip-
"Dope" = very good

Zambia represent = The commenter is indicating that he or she is representing Zambia (is from Zambia).

**
16. Scenia S
"I am in love with the video its so beautiful!!!!!"

**
17. russell marcell
"CONSTRUCTIVE ALL EMPOWERINNG , BLACK POSITIVE MUSIC. SUPERB SISTER SUBERB! ..WE SALUTE YOU!! Xxxxx"

**
18. Kiume Afrika
"@Sampa The Great Magnificent, Spectacular! This is, in my opinion one of or the finest project that you and your crew has put together. I really appreciate and enjoy your versatility. Much applauds to you Sampa Tembo! #BlackPower #BlackMagic #BlackGirlMagic #BlackWomanPower #RespectZambia #MotherlandStandup
Much Respect from the StL!
Da Original Mixing Mr J"

**
19. October33rd
"Amazing! What is this sampled from? I’ve been racking my brain. Sylvers maybe?"

**
REPLY
20. DJ Osric
"Yep. Stay Away From Me by The Sylvers."

**
21. Dj Bruno Boston
"KABOOM LOOK WHO STEPPED IN DA ROOM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

**
22. Jujujana love alchemy
"I'm sorry did bahamadia get reincarnated and no one told me? πŸ€”"
-snip-
Bahamadia (Antonia D. Reed, born April 22, 1966) is a Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Hip Hop artist who is still performing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bahamadia
-snip-
This commenter (and some other commenters) believe that Sampa the Great's style of rapping is like Bahamadia's.

**
23. David Sikaona
"Dude! This track drips with epicness!"

**
24. chisala mumba
"MY my my am glad you are on the Zambian team, this is what am talking about, excellent work! A lot of zambians need to learn from you, this is Real. God bless you!!!"

**
25. Cindy Missps
"Bless up Sampa
Great work
Powerful πŸ’₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯"

**
26. Mutale Mulenga
"OOOOHHHHHH!!!!! BARS GIRL. BADDEST FEMCEE"
-snip-
"Bars" are verses in Hip Hop compositions. Read the entry for "spitting fire" below.

"Femcee" - From https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=femcee
"femcee
A woman who raps or freestyles. The feminine equivalent of an 'emcee'.

[...]

by Seanio March 21, 2004"

**
27. Ananda Araujo
"The real rap! The roots, the essence! Go África!"

**
28. philani sibiya
"damn epic. It has been tested that the increased temperature across the globe was due to your music Sampha."

**
29. MOND MOTADI PRODUCTIONS
"stop sleeping on this legend!! she is just too freaken cool."
-snip-
"Sleeping on" = not paying attention to something or someone

**
30. Tony Mitchell
"Speechless! Which speaks volumes for me. Vocally, Visually & Execution is Excellent! Dope beyond belief!! Overall I truly appreciate you for this joint & 100% a fan of your music, Thank You. πŸ’–"

**
31. Paul Cholwe
"Dammmnn am a fan..Proud that I was there to witness your performance back here in Zed. You're truly dope give us iwe!πŸ‘πŸΎπŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²"
-snip-
"Give us iwe" ? Is "iwe" a way of writing the Jamaican word "irie" and does "give us iwe" mean "Give us life?

**
32. Musonda Chanda
"this is dope, very creative and lyrically on point this is real Hip Hop"

**
33. Anne-marie Sievu
"You’re so talented. Thank you for representing us well. I know you will blow up πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²❤️"
-snip-
"blow up" = become famous; successful

**
34. Munya
"She from Zambia ? That's Hella dope πŸ”₯!!!"
-snip-
"Hella" = very

**
35. Boycizm
"Yes u have found your form in your melanin!!! Great work! I'm a Zambian hiphop artist in Perth Australia and honestly I've never been prouder of someone reppin our flag like you. Bless πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯"
-snip-
"reppin" = representing

**
36. WhyCee
"Just got one word to say 'SICK' πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯"
-snip-
"Sick" here means very good/awesome.

**
37. Muky Dimes
"This that black superhero music right here. πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯ zambia πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡² stand up πŸ™ŒπŸΏ"

**
38. xoco dot
"This art shakes me up and down, so much strength, power and CHANGE emanating from this, I feel touched, blessed. I will watch and share it a hundred times, then a hundred thousand more. You are honoring and schooling melanine bodies, rhythm, roots, souls through and through! So much to absorbe, get inspired! It got me warm and READY to keep arming myself, intellect and spirit. Female Energy, Revolution, Asè!!!"

**
39. John Doe
"The dudes are FINE omg"
-snip-
Dudes = men
"Fine" = very nice looking

**
40. Bradley Jackson
"Homegirl went off!"
-snip-
"Homegirl" = strictly speaking, a girl from your home town, but here that term might mean the same thing as the colloquial form of "sister" or "girly". "Went off" means the same thing as "went in" = gave all her energy to what she was doing, did something very well
**
41. Shev Blaze
"Bahamadia mix with some Lauryn Hill... I love it"

**
42. Annette Goka
"I absolutely love this sister's style and flow"
-snip-
"Flow" how smoothly a person raps

**
43. Ken Lungu
"I can feel the soul in her music 😍"

**
44. GRM780 Unlimited
"Great looking young lady with excellent voice, rhyme skills and delivery. I like the way she intertwined her culture with in the video."

**
45. White Coat and Hijab
"Be proud of your melanin, no matter the percentage. EAST OR WEST or SOUTH or NORTH Africans. We all black whether we appear to have less or more melanin.✌πŸ½πŸ‡ΈπŸ‡΄πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ"

**
REPLY
46. Roble Viejo
"I have some too.. In very specific and tiny spots.. Freckles!"

**
47. Owami Mpho Mbele
"the hook... ohh gawd. respect Sampa"

**
48. Liseli Akayombokwa
"Give us IWE!!! Zambia represent!!! Your Ancestors are with you..."

**
49. Peter Slumko
"OMG!!! Sampa you're really the great, this is the kinda muzic people need... We need more sheroes like her people"
-snip-
"sheroes" = female form of "heroes"

**
50. Da Royal General
"WOW!!! 90's WU TANG-ism. some real irie vibes. much respect for this."
-snip-
Bold font was used in this comment.

WU-Tang Clan is a very well respected American hard core Hip Hop group that were known for their afrocentricity.

"irie" = Jamaican Patois term meaning "nice", "good", "pleasing".

**
51. Anthony Shintai
"The energy I get from this!!!!!! Uplifting my brothers and sisters"

**
52. Chrissant Chota
"Zambia to the world"

**
53. Queen Sheba
"This song goes too hard"
-snip-
A song going "too hard" is a compliment.

**
54. Tegan Taudigani
"So empowering! Been trying to hide my race for a long time, so this song means alot to me in more ways than one. Thank you!"
-snip-
The photograph that accompanied this comment showed a very light skinned female.

**
55. soulstyle organic hair salon
"Tuuuuune"
-snip-
When written along, the word "Tune" (also written as "chune" or "choon") means that the same thing as "That's my jam". ("I really love this song".)

**
56. Rebellious Garden
"This is straight nasty..... I am loving all my fellow female rappers coming out...."
-snip-
In the context of this comment, a song described as being "straight nasty" is a compliment, and doesn't refer to the song having sexually explicit content/performance.

**
57. Da Royal General
"jah know naaw lie....this BADDD!!!"
-snip-
This comment is written in bold font in this discussion thread.
In standard English, this sentence is "God doesn't lie... This is very good!"

**
58. MrTurtleThief
"Whoever chose the clothing needs a raise, very nice"

**
59. Halona Black
"OK. Clearly, I wasn't ready. This here is straight fire."
-snip-
A song that is "straight fire" (and "fire" without the adjective "straight") means it is very good.

**
60. Plum 354
"Feeling this. Yaaaas"

**
61. Deela Yah-Shabazz
"WOW. She has yet to let me down! Straight FYE"
-snip-
"FYE"= fire

**
62. Tapfuma Vudzijena
"she went in on this one πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯"
-snip-
"went in" = put all one's heart and soul into doing something

**
63. Croco Lungs
"Too nice. This should be a soundtrack. The visuals are epic."

**
64. Lolo LB
"YasssssπŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ™ŒπŸΎπŸ™ŒπŸΎπŸ™ŒπŸΎ omg love all the details in the video πŸ’ͺ🏽πŸ’ͺ🏽πŸ’ͺ🏽"
-snip-
"Yass" is a contemporary hip way of writing and saying "Yes".

**
65. Steffortlessness
"Too fly with it"
-snip-
"Fly" is an African American Vernacular English adjective that means "hip" (up to date with the latest street fashion and lingo). "Too fly" means "very fly".

**
66. juniemz1
"Ahhhh just discovered you and love ya!! I’ve been missing out and binge watching & listening to your music! Can’t wait to see you in Brooklyn! 😁😁 So proud of you repping Zed!!πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²πŸ€—"

**
67. Times Up 2U
"Sampa the Great - U owe me a new cell phone. This ish is so lit that it burned my hands."
-snip-
"ish" is a socially correct way of saying "sh&t" which, in this comment and many other colloquial conversations, can be a neutral referent for anything.

lit= something that is (or someone who is) very hot (very good)

**
68. You Ryse
"Here before the million :p"
-snip-
"Million" here refers to the million views for this video.

**
69. Zuma B
"FIRE BON! Shout out from New Zealand, CHIPOLOPOLO!"
-snip-
"Fire Bon" (probably) bonfire (another way of saying that the song is hot (very good)
"Shout out" = public recognition/applause/congratualtions
Chipolopolo = ?

**
70. Frank Dante Nyirenda
"Am not going to lie ...you really are greatness in the making πŸ™Œ"

**
71. Lady G256
"Very nice πŸ‘πŸΎπŸ’ͺ🏾black power"

**
72. taugadi
"Wow the costumes are sickening 😍😍"
-snip-
"sickening" = "very good"

**
73. Jane mwila
"Just wat zed music needs ...greatness"
-snip-
"Zed" = colloquial referent for Zambia (from the British pronunciation for the letter "z").

**
74. rjay gemus
"That's real rap right there"

**
75. Mainga
"Legendary...Taking Zambia to different levels 🧑 πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡²"

**
76. simona evans
"Beautifully Magnificent QueenπŸ‘ΈπŸΏπŸ‘ΈπŸΏπŸ‘ΈπŸΏ"

**
77. William Mckinney
"They taking it back to the Ol Hip Hop sound of the 90s Black American style in the Mother Land"
-snip-
"The Motherland" = Africa

**
78. AlexJCorona
"So glad Sampa is getting traction. Been listening to her for time. Powerhouse attitude."

**
79. Christina Love
"Yaassss!!!! I'm here for all this amazing lyrical magic, black girl magic, amazing video of cultural celebration ✊πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘"

**
80. 1upanu
"BOOM!!!"
-snip-
The sound that explosions make. In the context of this discussion thread, "boom" refers to something being "dynamite"(i.e. in African American Vernacular English- very good)

**
81. professor
"Supreme fire from the empress.This bout to blow. πŸ”₯πŸ”₯"
-snip-
"This about to blow"= "blow up"; become very big; become very popular

**
82. alexgalvarez
"So nice i had to listen to it twice. Sampa spits fyah. Peace, love much success to you from from Miami."
-snip-
From https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-difference-between-spitting-fire-and-dropping-bars-in-rap-hip-hop
J. Royeaux, Female rap collegiate researcher
Answered Aug 19, 2017
“Spitting fire” and “dropping bars” derive from the same notion of rapping notable verses.

[...]

“Spitting fire” is ussually referencing verses that are either noteworthy due to impressively written punchlines (clever verses/bars) or fast rapping.

“Dropping bars” can have the same notion, but often comes with the implication that those bars have artistic value within a hip hop song - since bars are by definition verses within a rap song - either due to the verse’s writing or the context I in which their were written (you can see where the two phrases can be used often interchangeably."...

**
83. Darbuka Mazuka
"This is a hard ass tune . Video got me ready to move."
-snip-
"hard ass" = "hard" in reference to Hip Hop) is a compliment, meaning "awesome" (The people aren't playing. They are seriously working (working hard). "Hard ass" means the same thing as "hard".

**
84. charlieknockout
"this is an instant classic. hip hop is still alive"

**
85. Dominic Chimpakasa
"This is just awesome, I have played this song more than ten times. You putting Zambia on the World map"

**
REPLY
86. Conscious Queens Books Club
"YES!!!"

**
87. Richelle Eli
"She made me want to travel to Zambia"

**
88. Von Grim
"Your Greatness, you killed em with this one!"
-snip-
"killed em (them) is a "incorrect" use of the African American Vernacular term "killed it" (doing something very well).

**
89. Covert Introvert
"This is dope!!"
-snip-
"Dope" very good

**
90. SSK Music Beats
"I wasnt ready for this FIRE."

**
91. jbaby007
"πŸ’œπŸ’œπŸ’œMy beautiful brothas and sistasπŸ’œπŸ’œπŸ’œ✊🏾"
-snip-
"brothas" and sistas" (brothers and sisters) here means "Black men and Black women".

**
92. Transcendent Life
"This is legendary!!!Major proud of you gyal, keep raising the Zambian πŸ‡ΏπŸ‡² flag higher. Much love πŸ’—"
-snip-
"gyal" = Jamaican Patois way of writing the word "girl".

****
This concludes Part II of this pancocojams post.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.