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Sunday, February 16, 2020

Information About & Videos Of African American Women Giving Hugs When Greeting People Or Saying Goodbye

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents information about how a number of African American women sometimes greet and say goodbye to each other and some men.

This post also includes a video of "Black women hugging" and two other related videos.

The content of this post is presented for cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
This post is closely related to the 2020 pancocojams post entitled "The History & Meanings Of African American's Dap Handshakes (with YouTube videos)" https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2020/02/the-history-meanings-of-african.html

Daps are usually done only by men to other men.

Here's how some African American women often greet each other and how we often greet African American men:
Depending on who they are and where they are (for instance, whether or not they are in a predominately Black setting or a predominately White setting) some African American women greet other African American women and African American men by briefly and lightly hugging each other. This form of hugging is usually to the side and not belly to belly.

Sometimes African American women will pat each other or Black men on the back while hugging and sometimes we will give air kisses (pretend to give a kiss on each cheek of the person being hugged).

"The hug" with or without patting on the back and/or air kisses is the expected form of greeting that most Black women do and expect to receive at Black functions such as an African dance program and a Kwanzaa gathering.

I've also given "the hug" to some non-Black women-and less often, some non-Black men- depending on our setting and how familiar and comfortable with African American culture I believe they are.

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
1. The Ben Show - Black Women Hugging



Comedy Central, Apr 23, 2014

When you're feelin' down and you need some lovin', just look at black women hugging.
-snip-
In my experience, the longer, more enthusiastic hugs that are shown in this video with huggers rocking back and forth are only done between people who know each other well and may not have seen each other for some time.

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2. Greetings and Goodbyes, Hug or Handshake? Hugging and American Culture



Rachel's English, Oct 20, 2015

Americans usually hug when saying 'hello' or 'good-bye'. But sometimes it's a handshake instead -- and sometimes it gets awkward! In this video, Rachel goes over when to hug and when to shake hands in American culture.
-snip-
In my experience, in some settings (as I mentioned in Pancocojams Editor's Note above), a hug is expected even if you are just meeting a person. This differs from the statement that is made at .40 in this video "You don't do this [give a hug] to someone you've never met. However, I agree with the woman speaking in this video that hugs are usually not done in formal settings.

By the way, the comments in this video's discussion thread are quite interesting as they include comments about hugging/air kissing as greetings/goodbyes from people from various nations throughout the world.

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
I haven't found a video of African American women giving air kisses.

However, here's a video of air kissing for greeting and saying goodbye in European cultures. That air kissing is somewhat similar to some African American women (in certain settings) when greeting or saying goodbye to other women or to men.

The Etiquette of Social Kissing



engclass0, Dec 20, 2007

How do many Europeans greet each other at social gatherings?

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Visitor comments are welcome.

The History & Meanings Of African American's Dap Handshakes (with YouTube videos)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part IV of a four part pancocojams series on American hand gestures. Part IV of this series focuses on dap (handshakes).

Each of the posts in this series focus on hand gestures that were either created by African Americans or have been most closely associated with African Americans.

For Part I of this series (Five On The Black Hand Side handshakes), click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/05/five-on-black-hand-side-handshake.html.

For Part II of this series (High Fives),
click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/05/high-five-handshake-videos.html

For Part III of this series (Fist Bump/"Pound") click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/05/fist-bump-pound-handshakes.html.

The content of this post is presented for historical, folkloric, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

The copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those quoted in this post, and to all those who are featured in these videos. Thanks also to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.
-snip-
Most of this pancocojams post was originally published in May 2012. http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/05/giving-daps-intricate-handshakes.html.

The 2012 post has a section that isn't included in this post.

Some of the videos in this 2020 post are different than the videos in the 2012 post.

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
Daps are usually done only by men to other men.

Here's how some African American women often greet each other and how we often greet African American men:
Depending on who they are and where they are (for instance, whether or not they are in a predominately Black setting or a predominately White setting) some African American women greet other African American women and African American men by briefly and lightly hugging each other. This form of hugging is usually to the side and not belly to belly.

Sometimes African American women will pat each other or Black men on the back while hugging and sometimes we will give air kisses (pretend to give a kiss on each cheek of the person being hugged).

"The hug" with or without patting on the back and/or air kisses is the expected form of greeting that most Black women do and expect to receive at Black functions such as an African dance program and a Kwanzaa gathering.

I've also given "the hug" to some non-Black women-and less often, some non-Black men- depending on our setting and how familiar and comfortable with African American culture I believe they are.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2020/02/information-about-videos-of-african.html for the pancocojams post entitled "Information About & Videos Of African American Women Giving Hugs When Greeting People Or Saying Goodbye"

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PART IV
GENERAL OVERVIEW OF DAP HANDSHAKES
From http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-dap-greeting.htm
"A dap greeting is a series of arranged gestures exchanged between two individuals. Although a dap greeting can be exchanged upon meeting someone, it can also be used to indicate agreement, celebration or fellowship at any time. A dap greeting can include slapping hands, bumping fists in any direction, snapping, wiggling fingers and other forms of contact, and it can last anywhere from a few seconds to more than a minute. Dap greetings originated in the black community and have since spread to other racial groups, with many subcultures and groups of friends developing their own very specific dap greetings...

Origins

This type of greeting typically is non-verbal, and it is exchanged as a gesture of affection and solidarity. Dap greetings are believed to have originated in Africa, where people from different tribes might exchange such greetings upon meeting each other to indicate peaceful and friendly intentions. Blacks who emigrated to other parts of the world — including those forcefully transported as slaves — developed their own dap greetings...

Meaning of "Dap"
Some people believe that “dap” is an acronym for “dignity and pride,” reflecting the adoption of the dap greeting by the black power movement. Others suggest that “dignity and pride” is merely what is sometimes called a "backronym" — an acronym thought up after a word already existed. "Dap" also might be a shortening of another word or an onomatopoeia — a word that imitates the noise produced by this type of greeting; some dap greetings create a sound much like “dap,” which is produced by pulling the slightly cupped hands of the participants against each other."
**
From http://www.articlesnatch.com/Article/Shake-That--The-Right-Way/3669693
Shake That! The Right Way By: liss
"[In] Benin [West Africa], young men snap fingers while shaking hands. In Botswana [South Africa], people touch hands with a slight grazing of the palms and fingers. In Singapore [Asia], after you handshake its customary to place the other persons hand over your heart. Among Scandinavian [Europe] teens, exchanging spit by means of a handshake seals a deal...

Jamaicans complain that Americans are distant and Americans complain that Germans are cold and unfriendly. Sure, when you first meet them, Jamaicans dont shake hands with you. But once you get acquainted, they expect a casual lock and fly or a one harmed hug or a shug or a bro grab or a hetero-hug or whatever its known as in your country" ...
**
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dap_greeting:
"Though it can refer to many kinds of greetings involving hand contact, dap is best known as a complicated routine of shakes, slaps, snaps, and other contact that must be known completely by both parties involved. Dap greeting sometimes include a pound hug."

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DAPS: EXCERPT FROM THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE IN VIETNAM: BROTHERS IN ARMS
*ADDED SECTION [February 25, 2018] : The African American Experience in Vietnam: Brothers in Arms
By James E. Westheider
https://books.google.com/books?id=VHEL34ALzO4C&pg=PA76&lpg=PA76&dq=fist+pounding+heart+handshake&source=bl&ots=McVvUG2DxW&sig=AnQNKfKkpEk2V9WQZ0wUecSa-VA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwin19vV7MHZAhXIUt8KHdCYB9w4ChDoAQgvMAE#v=onepage&q=fist%20pounding%20heart%20handshake&f=false
page 76
..."African Americans who remained in the armed services often reacted to racism by seeking comfort and safety in racial solidarity and by establishing their own sub-culture within the military. They called each other “brother”, “soul brother”, or “bloods”, and they were proud of being black. Two popular methods of greeting fellow black soldiers and demonstrating racial solidarity were the black power salute, a clenched fist in the air, and the “dab”, which developed in Vietnam, probably among inmates of the notorious Long Binh stockade. Dap is a corruption of the word “dep” Vietnamese slang for something beautiful. The dap, also known as “checking in”, was an intricate ritualized handshake, involving numerous gestures and movements. There was no standard dap, but there were many common gestures. There were countless variations of dap, and some of the more common greetings could go on for five or more minutes. Each move had a specific meaning: Pounding on the heart with a clenched fist, for example, symbolized brotherly love and solidarity; clenching fingers together and then touching the backside of the hand meant “My brother, I’m with you”. Most of the gestures signified solidarity, respect, and pride, but a few had darker meanings. A slicing movement across the throat symbolized cutting the throats of white MPs, never a favorite group among black recruits."...

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Video #1: Handshake Tutorial



Michael W Gaskins, July 24, 2009

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Video #2: lebrons Pre-game handshakes



Uploaded by nlnodoubt on Dec 20, 2009

lebron james secret handshakes with his Cleveland cavaliers teammates, He is truly an incredible talent.
-snip-
Actually, I don't think these handshakes are secret. "Personalized" is probably a better word to describe them, as Lebron appears to have a different dap handshake for each person.

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Video #3: Monta Ellis' Amazing Handshake



Uploaded by SciFientology on Jan 14, 2010
-snip-
WARNING! A number of viewers of this video connected the handshake shown in this video with the Gangster Disciple Nation (GDN or GD).

Certain handshakes are associated with specific gangs. Those handshakes absolutely should NOT be done by people who aren’t members of those gangs.

[This prohibition against non-members doing this handshake doesn't apply to the high five that followed it.]
-snip-
In this clip, Monta Ellis said "I told ya I'd warm that thang up." (referring to the basketball shots that he made.]

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Video #4: Ebony & Ivory Handshake - The Bert Show



Uploaded by q100atlanta on Jun 19, 2011

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Video #5: Everybody Hates Chris and Albert Hand Shake



Sly Cooper, Aug 3, 2012

from season Season 3 Episode 9 of Everbody Hates Chris
-snip-
From
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everybody_Hates_Chris
"This television show is inspired by the teenage experiences of comedian Chris Rock (who is also the narrator). The show is set from 1982 to 1987; however, Rock himself was a teenager during years 1978-1983."

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Video #6: Fresh Prince - Will Jazz Handshake Compilation



Jibb's Compilations, Published on May 7, 2014

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Video #6: Wake Forest's Cortez Lewis Has A Handshake With Every Teammate



ACC Digital Network, Aug 17, 2015

Wake Forest redshirt freshman receiver Cortez Lewis has a different choreographed handshake for nearly everyone that he comes across. It has been written that he has more than 50 handshakes with members of the Demon Deacon football program. Watch as Lewis shows off his collection everywhere he goes from the football field, to the cafeteria and even the coaches' offices in this ACC Must See Moment.

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Video #7: Dignity and Pride Communicated by a Handshake



Great Big Story, Feb 5, 2018

The dap is more than just a handshake, it’s a symbol of solidarity, one with a long and proud history behind it. The origins of this greeting trace back to young Black American soldiers stationed abroad during the Vietnam War. With racism prevalent in the military and a new Black consciousness emerging during the civil rights movement, the young soldiers developed a physical language as a gesture of unity. Thus was born the dap, an acronym for “Dignity and Pride.” Photographer LaMont Hamilton has been studying the historical impact of the dap in his series “Five on the Black Hand Side,” telling the story of how the handshake came to hold such a profound place in Black culture.

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Saturday, February 15, 2020

What The African American Saying "All My Skinfolk Ain't My Kinfolk" REALLY Means

Edited by Azizi Powell

Latest revision - Feb. 16, 2020

This pancocojams post provides explanations for the African American saying "All my skinfolk ain't kinfolk" (or similarly worded sayings).

This post also showcases seven excerpts from several online sources that include the saying "All my skinfolk ain't my kinfolk" (or similarly worded sayings).

The content of this post is presented for cultural and linguistic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Novelist, essayist, anthropologist, and filmaker Zora Neale Hurston is widely credited as popularizing the saying "All my skinfolks ain't kinfolks".

Thanks to Zora Neale Hurston for her cultural legacy. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post.

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INFORMATION ABOUT ZORA NEALE HURSTON AND THE SAYING "ALL SKINFOLK AIN'T MY KINFOLK"
The saying "All my kinfolk ain't my skinfolk" is widely credited to Zora Neale Hurston. Read the quote given as #1 below that indicates that Zora Neale Hurston popularized that saying (as opposed to originated [coined] that saying).

Here's information about Zora Neale Hurston from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zora_Neale_Hurston
"Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891[1][2] – January 28, 1960) was an American author, anthropologist, and filmmaker. She portrayed racial struggles in the early-20th-century American South and published research on Hoodoo.[3] The most popular of her four novels is Their Eyes Were Watching God, published in 1937. She also wrote more than 50 short stories, plays, and essays.

[...]

Hurston's works concerned both the African-American experience and her struggles as an African-American woman. Her novels went relatively unrecognized by the literary world for decades. Interest was revived in 1975 after author Alice Walker published an article, "In Search of Zora Neale Hurston", in the March issue of Ms. magazine that year."...
-snip-

Unfortunately, although numerous online sources attribute the saying "All my skinfolk ain't my kinfolk" to Zora Neale Hurston, none of those sources indicate when and where Huston used that saying (for instance, in which of her books or essays). Also, I wonder how widespread the saying "All my skinfolk ain't my kinfolk" actually was among African Americans before Zora Neale Huston popularized it.

In my online perusal of published examples of "All my skinfolk ain't my kinfolk", the earliest example of that saying was in 2004. Here's an excerpt of that example:
From http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,880301,00.html 10 Questions For Tavis Smiley
By Christopher John Farley; Tavis Smiley Sunday, Dec. 05, 2004
..."WHAT'S MORE DIVERSE THESE DAYS — NPR OR PRESIDENT BUSH'S CABINET?

Bush's Cabinet. It is ironic that a Republican President has an Administration that is more inclusive and more diverse than a so-called liberal-media-elite network.

BUT DO BUSH'S MINORITY SELECTIONS REFLECT THE VALUES OF THE COMMUNITIES FROM WHICH THEY COME?

There is a distinction between symbolism and substance — Zora Neale Hurston once said, "All my skinfolk ain't my kinfolk." But whether one likes or loathes the people Bush has chosen to be part of his Administration, he is reaching out."...
-snip-
If you know of any published examples prior to 2004 of the saying "All my skinfolk ain't my kinfolk" other than the quote attributed to Zora Neale Hurston, please share that information in the comment section below. Thanks in advance!

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DEFINITION OF "KINFOLK"
From https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/kinfolk
"kinfolk
Your kinfolk are the people in your family. Even very distant cousins you've never met can be described as your kinfolk.

When anthropologists use the term kinfolk, they mean people who are related by blood and share a common ancestor. You can use the word in a much wider way, though, to include people related by marriage and adoption, as well as friends who are so close you consider them part of your family. Kinfolk combines the Old English roots cynn, or "family," and folc, "people." "

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DEFINITION OF "SKINFOLK"
From https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=skinfolk
"skinfolk
Someone who is of your own race or skin colour but not your family or friends , probably not someone you even like
All my skinfolk are not my kinfolk
by Deebaby January 18, 2017
-snip-
This bold font was used in this comment on that page. This is the only entry for "skinfolk" on that page (as of the date & time of this pancocojams post).

I think that Deebaby meant "not [just] your family or friends".

One's skinfolk usually also include one's kinfolk. However, for various reasons (including interracial marriage and adoption), members of a person's family may not be the same race/s and/or ethnicity/s as that person. Also, a person can have friends who aren't the same race/ethnicity/s that they are.

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MY EXPLANATION OF THE SAYING "ALL MY SKINFOLK AIN'T MY KINFOLK"
The saying "All my skinfolk ain't my kinfolk" means that just because a person has the same skin color that you do (is a member of the same race/ethnicity as you are), that doesn't mean that they will treat you like a family member (i.e. be supportive and considerate of you, and/or agree with you on the issues that you consider important.)

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SEVERAL ONLINE DEFINITIONS OR EXCERPTS THAT EXPLAIN OR USE THE SAYING "ALL MY SKINFOLK AIN'T MY KINFOLK"(AND SIMILARLY WORDED SAYINGS)

(These excerpts are given in no particular order and are numbered for referencing purposes only.)

1. From https://www.farooqkperogi.com/2014/02/25-black-american-english-expressions_23.html 25 Black American English Expressions You Should Know (II)
By Farooq A. Kperogi, Ph.D., Sunday, February 23, 2014

[...]
"24. “Skin folk.” This is a Black English expression for members of one’s race. It’s modeled on the Standard English expression “kinfolk,” which means members of one’s nuclear and extended family. The phrase was popularized by Zora Neale Hurston, an African-American folklorist and author who once famously said “All my skinfolk ain't kinfolk.” It is a witty and creative way to say “not all people who share the same racial identity as me are my family.” In other words, there is more to friendship and affinity than mere racial similarity. African-Americans say this when they are betrayed by fellow blacks."

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2. From https://tcchitima.wordpress.com/2017/11/03/all-my-skinfolk-aint-kinfolk/ “All my skinfolk ain’t kinfolk” by TCCHITIMA, NOVEMBER 3, 2017
"In my time at Girls’ College I came to the realisation that “all my skinfolk ain’t my kinfolk” This quote by Zara Neale Hurston perfectly describes the system at my school. The quote means that not all people who share the same racial identity as me are my family. This hit me hard. For a while, I’ve been wanting to speak up about the system that is rooted in inequality at my school and I’ve been getting messages from other black people telling me not to speak up because I’m still at the school or not to speak up because I’m leaving and it is no longer my issue. What they don’t understand is it is and always will be my issue! I am a proud black girl who loves everything about herself! I personally may not have been broken down by the system but my sisters have and they may not always be able to voice out their opinions!

[...]

The school encourages a snitch system reminiscent of apartheid/colonial eras and what I consider a disingenuous “campaign game” where you are rewarded according to your level of conformity. This has led to deeply engrained fear in a majority of the girls – afraid to speak up even when given a platform to do so anonymously… This is heartbreaking.

I stand in solidarity with all of the girls at my school affected by the racist remarks that were made at my school and attempts to erase our ethnicity and identity. I stand with those who have already spoken out and we stand for those who haven’t found the courage to speak up!"

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3. From https://extraecclesiamestlibertas.wordpress.com/2015/11/05/all-my-skinfolk-aint-my-kinfolk/
"All My Skinfolk Ain’t My Kinfolk" NOVEMBER 5, 2015 ~ LMICKENS
"One of Republican presidential hopeful Ben Carson’s schticks is his insistence that if nominated and elected, he would be America’s first “real black president.” As opposed to the “fake black” president we have now. This assertion isn’t new, since Herman Cain was saying the same thing during his own failed presidential run, and this meme is being reiterated by white Republicans who are desperate to run a black candidate to make them seem less white and less racist. Whatever one thinks of Obama’s policies, the notion that he is somehow “less black” than Carson or Cain ignores the way in which blackness was and is constructed in the United States.

As I have mentioned before, using the one drop rule as the basis for determining who is black “defines blackness down” to the point where it has no meaning. If you go to Latin America or Europe, black people are considered to be, well, black. Beige, tan, coffee-colored,and copper-colored people are considered to be in a different category altogether, but in the United States all would be considered “black.” Booker T. Washington and Frederick Douglass both had white fathers, yet no one questions whether they are black.

Perhaps what Carson means is that Obama’s background and personal history differ too much too from that of the “average black person.” To which I would ask: so what? Contrary to what many people would have you believe, there is no single normative black experience. I know a lot of people would consider my own experiences — private secondary schools, private colleges, extensive post-graduate education, socialized mainly among white people, no experience in “the black church” — to not be a normative black experience.

There are as many black experiences as there are black people, and each experience is peculiar to that person. It’s particularly ironic, because Obama did everything right according to the conservative life plan (go to elite schools, wait until marriage to have children, got a number of high-paying positions) and actually governs to the right of Nixon, but is considered to be some kind of fire-breathing communist.

I think what is really going on is that conservatives think that black people voted for Obama simply because he’s black, so if they can get a black candidate of their own to field, they can finally get some of those sweet, sweet minority votes. Except if you actually look at the statistics .

[...]

What Carson actually shows to me is that wingnuttery comes in many colors. Every day he seems to come up with some new ridiculous statement, like the pyramids were built by the Biblical character Joseph to store grain ( http://www.timesofisrael.com/carson-pyramids-not-tombs-built-by-joseph-to-store-grain) or that the Holocaust could have been prevented if the Jews had been armed (http://bluenationreview.com/ben-carson-implies-holocaust-could-have-been-prevented-if-jews-were-armed). While Carson may be a skilled surgeon, he has no business making public policy. Indeed, I think fellow black atheist Zora Neal Hurston said it best when she said, “All my skinfolk ain’t my kinfolk.”....

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4. From https://www.theroot.com/the-politics-of-being-woke-1790856010 "The Politics of Being Woke" Lawrence Ware, 7/14/16
..."This is the heart of what it means to be “woke.” The masses of black folks who were lulled to sleep by economic opportunity have now awoken to the fact that race is, and will remain, a central part of the black experience. Yet there is disagreement about who is allowed to be woke and what is expected of those who have now entered into this new existential state of being.

Who Gets Access?
For me, being woke means awakening to the pervasive, intersectional insidiousness of white supremacy. This awakening is not limited to people of color. Black folks are not the only ones who needed a wake-up call.

Souls that inhabit white bodies can be allies and accomplices in the fight against oppression, in the same way that black folks can be agents and accomplices in promoting, promulgating and protecting white supremacy. As my grandmother once said, conjuring Zora Neale Hurston, “All your skinfolk ain’t your kinfolk.” Meaning that you can inhabit a black body and be an agent of white supremacy. Just ask Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, or any of the thousands of black Americans who are more concerned with white feelings than with black lives and bodies. Black folks don’t have the market cornered on being “woke,” and there is no agreement about how best to actualize the potentiality of the black community.”...

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5. From https://www.iesabroad.org/blogs/kandise-le-blanc/melanin-milan-finding-my-people-abroad#sthash.8GhHD6YU.dpbs "Melanin in Milan: Finding My People Abroad"
by Kandise Le Blanc, October 16, 2019
...."There’s a popular quote from Zora Neale Hurston within the Black community: “All my skinfolk ain’t kinfolk.” Meaning that just because someone is Black doesn’t mean that they’ll always have your back. Zora Neale Hurston’s quote highlights how Black folks can be pitted against one another. But when Black people support one another, we have the incredible capability to lift up one another. Time and time again, the Black students at IES Abroad Milan have shown up for me. From making dinner together to cheering like proud parents anytime I sing, these amazing people have become la mia famiglia (my family)."
-snip-
In the context of that post, "IES" means "The Institute for the International Education of Students, or IES Abroad, is a non-profit study abroad organization that administers study abroad programs for U.S. college-aged students." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Institute_for_the_International_Education_of_Students

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6. From https://www.facebook.com/forblackwomenonly/posts/all-skin-folk-aint-kinfolk-dont-be-bullied-or-psychologically-blackmailed-into-s/1133033590041163/
For Black Women ONLY, March 1, 2016
"All skin-folk ain't kinfolk". Don't be bullied or psychologically blackmailed into supporting just anyone because they are black, especially if the work they produce or the values they uphold aren't in line with your values.
If they:

-denigrate black women's image for laughs
-abuse black women and children off-stage
-degrade and devalue blackness and the black identity (e.g. by stating that mixed race people are better looking, etc.)
-establish disparities among black people by cultures
-pander to racist Whites by placing the onus of racism on black people
and that is NOT about who you are and what you stand for, stick to your guns and REMOVE ALL FORMS OF SUPPORT."....
-snip-
The word "sh&t" (fully spelled out) is used several times in that post.

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7. From https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2020/1/28/1914021/-Black-Kos-Tuesday-s-Chile-Remembering-Zora-s-words-and-wisdom
Black Kos, Tuesday's Chile: Remembering Zora's words and wisdom
2020/01/28
“All my skinfolk ain’t my kinfolk” ~ Zora Neale Hurston

Commentary by Black Kos Editor Denise Oliver-Velez

"As I watch certain folks, who may share melanated skin with me, and a family history of enslavement, persist in sucking up to the very people who would gladly sell us all back into shackles in hopes of gaining favor with the orange massa in the White House and his lackeys, I hear the words of Sistah Zora Neale Hurston in my head.

“All my skinfolk ain’t my kinfolk”

At a time when an all-white slate of Democratic Presidential candidates are fightin’ like yard dogs over a bone, to win over the black vote with new promises and plans, and blue check mark black Twitterati are pontificatin’ and vying to deliver that which they actually cannot do (but will get brownie points for trying) I hear Zora’s voice again, which smart politicians should heed (though I doubt many or any of them have read her)

“But for the national welfare, it is urgent to realize that the minorities do think, and think about something other than the race problem.”

She coulda been talking about Donald Trump when she quipped:

“Anytime you catch folks lying, they scared of something.”

On the anniversary of her death, I seek the wisdom she offered during her life.

There is so much of it."...

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Friday, February 14, 2020

Shai - "If I Ever Fall In Love" (1992 R&B/Soul record information, video, lyrics, &comments)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases on one of my favorite old school R&B/soul music songs: the 1992 record "If I Ever Fall In Love Again" by Shai.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Carl Martin for composing "If I Ever Fall In Love Again" and thanks to Shai for their musical legacy. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of this video on YouTube.

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INFORMATION ABOUT THIS SONG
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/If_I_Ever_Fall_in_Love

If I Ever Fall in Love" is a song by American R&B-soul quartet Shai. The song reached number 2 in the US in 1992, and peaked at number two on the US R&B chart.[2] Its eight weeks at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US, which was held off from the top slot by The Height's How Do You Talk to an Angel and also due to the massive success of "I Will Always Love You" by Whitney Houston, it was blocked for another seven more weeks, meant that it held the record for the second-most weeks at number two in the chart's history at the time, behind Foreigner's "Waiting for a Girl Like You". The record has since been equalled and surpassed, and "If I Ever Fall In Love" is now in joint ninth place with a number of more recent songs.

The song was also their only Top 40 hit in the UK, peaking at number 36.[3]"...

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SHOWCASE VIDEO- Shai - If I Ever Fall In Love



ShaiVEVO, Oct 6, 2009

Music video by Shai performing If I Ever Fall In Love. (C) 1993 Geffen Records
-snip-
Statistics as of Feb. 14, 2020 at 10:11 AM
Total views- 73,741,964
Total likes- 517K
Total dislikes-20k
Total comments

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LYRICS - IF I EVER FALL IN LOVE AGAIN
(writer- Carl Martin)

The very first time
That I saw your brown eyes
Your lips said "Hello"
And I said "Hi"
I knew right then you were the one
But I was caught up
In physical attraction
But to my satisfaction
Baby you were more than just a phase
And if I ever (ever fall) in love again (again)
I will be sure that the lady is a friend
And if I ever (ever fall) in love so true (true)
I will be sure that the lady's just like you
Oooh
Yeeaah, baby, yeah
Ma-ma, ma-my, ma-my
I swear next time she'll be my friend
If I say that I can be your one and only
(Promise, promise) Promise that you'll never leave me lonely
I just wanna be the one you need
Oh baby
I just wanna be the one who serves you
Sometime I feel as if I don't deserve you
I cherish every moment that we share
And if I ever (ever fall) in love again (again)
I will be sure that the lady is a friend
And if I ever (ever fall) in love so true (true)
I will be sure that the lady's just like you
(My friend)
Very next time she will be my friend
Someone who I can believe in
(My friend)
[Repeat]
And if I ever (ever fall) in love again (again)
I will be sure that the lady is a friend
And if I ever (ever fall) in love so true (true)
I will be sure that the lady's just like you

Source: https://genius.com/Shai-if-i-ever-fall-in-love-lyrics

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SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THE DISCUSSION THREAD OF THIS EMBEDDED VIDEO
(with numbers added for referencing purposes only)
1. Luis Soto, 2018
"[looks around]👀

"myyy frieeeee*cough cough* ... nope, still cant do it""

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REPLY
2. Linda Mbithi, 2018
"😂😂😂😂😂"

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REPLY
3. Chevon Nunn, 2018
"lol......lol..."

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REPLY
4. Rugged Individualist ✓
"😂🤣😂🤣😂🤣 I feel you"

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5. Ceo founder, 2019
"Fall/Winter of 1992 into 1993!
Teenager growing up in Crown heights/Flatbush/Brooklyn!
Girls went crazy at every house/apartment party when any DJ played this hit/tune!
R&B in the 1990s was the last golden era/decade of real music with meaning, soul, harmony and a message!"

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6. Bebe Alvarado, 2019
"These were the times music got you in trouble 😜🤭😍you felt the music down in your soul the words made sense they meant something wish we had that kinda of music still,but we have YouTube we can find and listen to all that old good stuff 😉"

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7. LL CooL E, 2019
"Me and my boy Jason used to sing this all the time. We thought we could get the girls by singing to them. That was over 30+ years ago. Good times!"

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8. LIL IGNANT
"It’s amazing how four voices can come together an make one unique sound what ever happened to this type of music?"

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9. henrianna e, 2020
"This song still slaps in 2020✌😭"

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10. Goldz ESM, 2020
"This song will never get old so beautiful 2020 and 4eva 🙏🏾❤🔥"

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