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Thursday, March 5, 2015

Reference To "Bruck" Movement Included In A Jamaican Children's Singing Game Published in 1922

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post provides two versions of the Jamaican children's singing game "Mother Roland's Daughter" that is included in the 1922 book Folk-Games of Jamaica.

Both of those examples include the word "bruck" as a dance or movement term.

These examples are significant because they document that the word "bruck" was used as a dance or movement term in Jamaica long before the advent of the 1990s "bruk up" dance that was created and popularized by the dancer known by that name (Bruck Up"/George Adams). And these examples also document that the word "bruck" was used in Jamaica long before the 2012 Dancehall record "Bruk It Down" by Mr. Vegas. That said, it's my guess that the movement referred to as "bruck" in the singing games in that 1922 book was probably the same as or similar to the Caribbean movement known as "wining" [gyrating your hips] rather than the dance moves now known as "bruk up" or "bruk it down", dance moves which aren't the same thing. "Bruk up"= more contortionist pantomining storytelling, and "bruk it down" = twerking.

The Addendum of this post includes links to a "bruk up" video and the above mentioned "Bruk It Down" video. Excerpts from two articles about "bruk up" and "flex" dancing are also included in the Addendum.

The content of this post is provided for cultural, historical, and aesthetic reasons.

All copyrights remains with their owners.

Thanks to the Jamaican children whose singing games and rhymes are featured in this 1922 book. Thanks also to Martha Warren Beckwith and Helen H. Roberts for their field work and editing this book. Thanks also to those who published Folk-Games of Jamaica on the internet.

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FEATURED RHYME: Mother Roland's Daughter

(J. (Christiana.)

De grass so green, de lemon on de tree,
De bunch ob roses fallin' down,
Turn to de east an* turn to de west,
An* turn to de pretty little somber gal.
Take a lily an* a lily white rose,
Give her a-cross de ocean,
Give her a kiss an* a one, two, free,
An* bruck Mudder Rolan's daughter.

Bruck Mudder Rolan's daughter,

Bruck Mudder Rolan's daughter,

Bruck Mudder Rolan', bruck Mudder Rolan',

Bruck Mudder Rolan's daughter.

b. (Ballard's Valley.)

The grass so green, the lemon on the tree,
The bunch of roses we all can see.
Turn to the east, turn to the west,
Turn to the very one you love the best.
Oh, take a lily an* a lily-white girl,
And skip her across the ocean,
Give her a kiss and a one, two, three,
And jig Mother Roland's daughter.

(1) Jig Mother Roland's daughter,
Jig Mother Roland's daughter,

Jig Mother Roland, jig Mother Roland,
Jig Mother Roland silly girl.

(2) Dip Mother Roland's daughter. . . .

(3) Bruck Mother Roland's daughter . . .

(4) Wheel Mother Roland's daughter. . . .

Players join hands in a ring, two inside. All dance and sing.
At line six, the two in the center choose two out of the ring and
"skip," "jig," "dip," "brack,*" and "wheel" with them according
to the words of the song, which may be varied to suit the players.

48 "Rosy Apple, Lemon and Pear," Gomme II, 117; Udal (Dorsetshire), Folk-
lore Journal 7, 210; County Folk-lore (Suffolk), 64; (Surrey) Folk-lore Record 5, 85.
Cf. "Tread, tread the Green Grass*' and "Uncle John," Newell, 50, 72. In some
Versions, the name of the player is substituted for "Madame Roland." In Dorset-
shire, the song runs "old mother's runaway daughter"; in Suffolk it reads "Mrs.
Kilburn's daughter."

Source: http://archive.org/stream/Folk-gamesOfJamaica/FolkGamesJamaica_Beckwith_84pgs51310747_djvu.txt
Folk-Games of Jamaica Collected by Martha Warren Beckwith with music recorded in the field by Helen H. Roberts, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York, 1922, Example #61, pages 70-71
-snip-
These examples are given as found online, including the asterisks.

The words in parenthesis are place names in Jamaica.

The notes given as #48 are citations of other examples of similar rhymes.

"Brack" given in the directions for the singing game is probably a typo for “bruck”

"Wheel" means to spin around fast then stop and spin in the opposite direction.

"Jig" means to dance.

Since all refer to a dance movement, it's probable that "bruck" also refers to a dance movement.

****
PROBABLE MEANING OF "BRUCK" IN THESE SINGING GAMES
From http://jamaicanpatwah.com/term/Bruk-It-Dung/1419#.VPi_mI3wtv4
"Bruk It Dung (Noun)

English Translation
Break It Down

Definition
Jamaican dance move similar to twerking in which the dancer shakes her hips in an up-and-down bouncing motion.

Example Sentences [none given]

Patois: bruk, bruk, bruk, bruk, bruk, bruk it dung!
English: Break, break, break, break, break, break it down!

Related Words
Wine, Daggering, Bubble, Dutty wine ,
posted by oneidamorgan on October 2, 2013
-snip-
Definition of "wine" from http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=wine
"form of dance, involves gyration of hips, can be slow or fast must always be sexy. performed to mainly west indian music like reggae, calypso and soca.

if you don't mind...would you take a wine with me?
by destra November 05, 2003
-snip-
It should be noted that in Jamaica the word "bruck"/"bruk" combined with an adverb may have a meaning that has nothing to do with dancing. For example, "Bruk out" [is a] Slang expression used to describe someone who acts unruly or rebellious". http://jamaicanpatwah.com/term/Bruk-out/1456#.VPi-lY3wtv4

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ADDENDUM
Link to a video about "Bruk Up" dance:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLuYj9ZKxd4 Bruk Up origins (The movement) pt.1
Uploaded by by LBXdancers, on Apr 28, 2011
"The Bruck Up style was founded in Jamaica nd moved to NY around the yr 94'.
Bruck Up was founded by the man dancing in this named Bruck Up (George
Adams)... it has its own interpretation of animation (jamaican flavored) and storytelling.... with trademark moves such as the crabwalk, the shoulder pop, and many many more. Bruk Up (the original style) also has more looser movements tht look similar to Shotta dancing. Bruck Up in the current days incorporated waving, gliding, and bone breaking into the style for transitional purposes. The style has gradually evolved since then...'

****
Excerpt from http://pitchfork.com/thepitch/332-bounce-ballroom/
"Bounce Ballroom: A Night of Voguing, Flexing, and Housing"
By Miles Raymer, May 2, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. EDT
..."Hot 97 DJ Bobby Konders represented dancehall for the night, with a group of Brooklyn bruk-up and flex dancers accompanying him from a tiered stage. Bruk-up is the Jamaican style that you might be familiar with if you’ve ever watched any dancehall music videos; flexing is its Brooklyn-born descendent that pushes impressionistic breakdance moves like the robot into the fully abstract realm. (You may have seen this New Yorker profile on flex dancer Storyboard P.) The combination is a study in contrasts: sinuousness versus twitchiness, vogue-like fluidity versus something like a hyper-exaggerated version of the robot. At least two of the dancers were double-jointed. A husky member of the troupe took a solo shirtless, the better to show off his girth. One of them lifted up his t-shirt to demonstrate the compellingly odd and kind of gross way he can suck his gut in. It was a small demonstration of the possibilities of the human body, which is in many ways the basic job of dance."
-snip-
Click http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/01/06/the-impossible-body
Onward and Upward with the Arts January 6, 2014 Issue
The Impossible Body: Storyboard P, the Basquiat of street dancing.

****
Excerpt from the New Yorker profile of flex dancer Storyboard P [That article includes one instance of profanity and one instance of a homophobic referent.]
The style ][Flex] originated in the nineties, in Jamaica, where a young dancer who called himself Bruck Up—patois for, roughly, “broken”—became famous despite, or perhaps because of, having suffered a bone infection in his right leg as a child. Bruck Up’s style, heavy on rubbery contortions, spread through Brooklyn reggae clubs around the turn of the century, giving rise to flex...

Storyboard builds on the tension between virtuosity and handicap in Bruck Up’s dancing; he creates a feeling of grace only to hobble it. He performs languorous twirls and glides, but fits of trembling motion give the impression that he moves under painful constraint"...

****
Click https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5EBrftUKBY for Mr. Vegas' "Bruk It Down"
[Warning: That video might be considered somewhat risque.]

Note that "bruck"/"bruk" aren't the same thing as the United States dance terms "buck" [the tap dance "buck and wing", or the clogging term "buck dancer" or the New Orleans Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs/second line term "buck jumpers", or the New Orleans Hip Hop/Majorette term "bucking" as
it is included in battle stands which have been popularized on the American television show "Bring It!".

Pancocojams post on each of those subjects can be found by entering those terms in this blog's search engine.

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Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Go Down Manuel Road, Part II (mento, ska, dancehall, & other versions)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part series on the Jamaican Mento (folk song) "Go Down Manuel Road" (also known as "Emanuel Road" and other titles).

Part II showcases five videos of "Go Down Manuel Road", including Mento, Ska, dancehall versions, as well as a rendition by Harry Belafonte. The Addendum of this post also includes a video of Jamaican folklorist Miss Louise Bennett. A portion of that video includes a clip of "Go Down Emanuel Road".

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/03/go-down-manuel-road-part-i-lyrics-stone.html for Part I of this series.

Part I provides information about this song, provides song lyrics, and showcases three videos of the stone passing game that is traditionally done while singing this song.

The content of this post is provided for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic reasons.

All copyrights remains with their owners.

Thanks to the composers of this song, and thanks to all those who are featured in these videos. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post, and thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

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FEATURED VIDEOS
These videos are presented in chronological order based on their publishing dates on YouTube with the examples with the oldest dates presented first.

Example #1: Charles Welsh & Chorus - Emmanuel Road & Mango Time - Jamaican Ring play or game song - mento


Kingstoned - soundzzUploaded on Feb 14, 2009

Emmanuel Road & Mango Time - Jamaican Ring play or game song mento ......one of the best known jamaican song emmaneul road origanated as a ring play game or game song that involves the passing of heavy stones round a circle of sqating men this song has heard as a calypso and in many other versions rhe present recording shows in its orgiginal form , sung to the thudding rhythm of the stones being passed around the circle ......the second song Mango time is an exsample of countrey dance style called mento a hybrid sort of music with a rhythm rather more foursquare than that of spanisch influenced music such as trinidadian calypso .. the performing group includes harmonica coconut grater scraped with a spoon , wooden trumpet .(a bass instrument made from a hollow brach of the trumpet tree :)),bottles , pipe joints , and a knife tapped on a pickblade . the melody of mango time is obviously of brittish origan , almost certenly a sea song imported via the port of kingstone in the 19th century( it seems closey related to the liverpool song maggie may) but the style of playing is wholly jamaican ..........enjoy!!! this piece of history

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Example #2: Harry Belafonte - Go Down Emanuel Road



Cupa42, Uploaded on Feb 2, 2010

you don't need description for this

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Example #3: Emmanuel Road - Echo Minott (Nah Lef Ya Riddim)



badinformer, Uploaded on Aug 3, 2010
-snip-
Here's a comment from that video's viewer comment thread:
970RudeBoy, 2013
"Nice early digital dancehall"

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Example #4: The Gaylads - Gal And Boy - (Emmanuel Road)



TheRickynow, Uploaded on Jan 25, 2011

Always loved this tune! Produced by Clement Dodd at Studio One with The Skatalites as backing band!

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Example #5: Manuel Road (GalangBoy) Chris Anderson Feat Rok



ChrisBentaAnderson Published on Oct 23, 2012

CHRIS ANDERSON BORN JAMAICA ( ST-MARY ).
Full Mento Album Tribute Comin' Soon
Remix BY _____DJ Gilbert,,,,,,Thanks Again

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ADDENUDM
Miss Louise Bennett



Bwoy Ruff Uploaded on Sep 10, 2006

Tribute To Miss Lou, bless her soul, she will always be remembered and keep Jamaicas cultural roots alive.......
-snip-
Click .45-1.24 of this video for a clip of the song game "Go Down Emanuel Road".

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This is the end of Part II of this series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Viewer comments are welcome.


Go Down Manuel Road, Part I (lyrics & stone passing videos)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a two part series on the Jamaican Mento (folk song) "Go Down Manuel Road" (also known as "Emanuel Road" and other titles).

Part I provides information about this song, provides song lyrics, and showcases three videos of the stone passing game that is traditionally done while singing this song. A video of a Ghanaian object passing game is included in the Addendum to this post.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/03/go-down-manuel-road-part-ii-mento-ska.html for Part II of this series. Part II showcases five videos of "Go Down Manuel Road", including Mento, Ska, dancehall versions, as well as a rendition by Harry Belafonte.

The content of this post is provided for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic reasons.

All copyrights remains with their owners.

Thanks to the composers of this song, and thanks to all those who are featured in these videos. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post, and thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE SONG "GO DOWN MANUEL ROAD"
"Go Down Manuel Road" is a traditional Jamaican stone (rock) passing game song. This song originated in the early 20th century if not before as a recreational song by men relaxing from their strenous work building roads. Although this song is probably more widely known as "Mauel Road", it's likely that the ealiest title of this song was "Emanuel Road".

Here's a comment about this game from http://ohic32.hubpages.com/hub/The-Beauty-of-Jamaican-Folk-Songs
"There are many different Jamaican folk songs, and all with different or sometimes similar tempo . They evoke different moods and feelings within the listener. Some of the songs call for people to engage in a session of fun and games. One such song is "Guh Dung Emmanuel Road Gal an Bwoiy" (Go Down Emmaneul Road Girls and Boys) which sees players in a ring trying to move the stones placed before them before it piles up. Moving the stones is all about timing or else, "Finga mash nuh cry gal an bwoiy. Memba a play wi deh play gal an bwoiy" (If your finger gets smashed don't cry. Remember we that we are playing)"
-snip-
The likely African origin of these games
Stone (rock, sticks, or other objects) passing games can be found in various African and Caribbean nations. Read the comment found under Example #1 from a Nigerian blogger who indicates that Jamaican and othe Caribbean rock passing songs have their source in Nigerian Igbo songs. Also, read another comment after the Example #1 video from a person from Surinam who indicates that that South American nation also has traditional rock (stone) passing songs.
-snip-
A comment about the Ghanaian stone passing game song "Obwisana" which was posted on http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=1254&c=36 provides one explanation for these types of games:
"Susan Arnold wrote me:

"I know this song as an Akan song from Ghana. 'Obo asi me nsa, nana, obo asi me nsa' which is sung in a circle by children. The Akan place great importance on co-operation and this circle game can't be played without that and a high degree of accuracy when placing the stone, especially as it gets faster and faster and more intricate with 2 stones tapped together or going round in the opposite direction."
-snip-
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/03/lyrics-meanings-of-ghanaian-song-sansa.html for Part I of a pancocojams post on the Ghanaian rock passing song "Sansa Kroma".

A pancocojams post about another Ghanaian rock passing song entitled "Obwisana" will be published ASAP.

As noted earlier, a video of a Ghanaian object passing game is included in this post's Addendum.

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LYRICS
Read the lyrics that were posted by Jw Carroll in the viewer comment thread for the video that is given as Example #1 in this post.

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FEATURED VIDEOS
These videos are presented in chronological order based on their publishing dates on YouTube with the examples with the oldest dates presented first.

Example #1: Patois games



brandeely Uploaded on Jan 15, 2007

This is the stone game. It's a traditional Jamaican childhood game played in rythm to a patois song.
-snip-
Selected comments from this video's viewer comment thread:
angelastuger, 2007
"we play a simular game in Surinam ( South Amerca),it's about a hot stone that is going to burn you. It's related to the painful expericiences of african slaves on the dutch plantations. The hot stone symbolizes the pain and suffering the slave did not want to think about . Why are playing it we sing : faya ston , no burn me so , no burn me so aging masra Dantjie kiri soma pidgin. It means:Hot stone do not burn , because master Dan has killied somebodies child again."

**
lfrancis18, 2007
"someone please my 80 year old mother and father told me they played this game in the 30's in jamaica. does anyone know the exact words"

**
chung1chu, 2010
"Another indication of how Igbo the Jamaicans (and many other carribeans) are. This is a Traditional Igbo game for kids which you will hardly find these days. We used sticks mainly (but it could be any object). The song would have changed as the original language is lost and a new one adopted. We used to sing: Okereke okereke ... Okoroafor okoroafor... Kedu ebe oga na aga? Oga na aga nga Oga na aga Oga na aga nga... (continues until somebody whacks your hand with his stick)"

**
Jw Carroll, 2014
"EMMANUEL ROAD (also known as "Mandeville Road" and "Go Down Manuel Road")
Editor: Examples of this song and the game associated with it often have the title "Manuel Road".

MANUEL ROAD (Example #1)
Go dung ah Manuel Road galang boy
Fi go bruk rock stone
Go dung ah Manuel Road galang boy
Fi go bruk rock stone
Bruk dem one by one...Galang boy
bruk dem 2 by 2...Galang boy
Finga mash nuh bawl
Rememba ah play wi a play...
sometin suh.....
-Ack33, Patois games , 2007

Here's the Standard American English translation of those Jamaican Patois words (with the exception of the last two words which may indicate that you are suppose to continue singing in that same pattern)
Go down Manuel Road, gal and boy
[you've got] To break rock stone
Go down Manuel Road, gal and boy
[you've got] To break rock stone
Break them one by one (gal and boy)
Break them two by two...(gal and boy)
if your finger gets mashed, don't cry
Remember this is just a game*
* [ Remember we're just playing (so don't get angry or upset) ]

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Example #2: Manuel Road vid 0001



Tony Tyrell, Uploaded on Oct 6, 2009

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Example #3: Go Down a Emmanuel Road



LearnVision2010's channel, Uploaded on Feb 23, 2012

Staff and Students of the JFLL St. Catherine AEC with the popular Jamaican Folk Song

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ADDENDUM

Ghana, Ayenyah, children's game after school



Tetsublackstar, Uploaded on Jan 8, 2010

My friend Michi shot this children's (maybe especially girls) play in Ayenyah village, Ghana.I seriously loved watching thier playing and listening to their singing. I want to go back to Ghana sooner and see my students again.

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This is the end of Part I of this series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Viewer comments are welcome.

Monday, March 2, 2015

Mickey Mouse Clubhouse's "Hot Dog (Hot Diggity Dog)" Song - Its Lyrics & Its Cultural Influences

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases the American children's television Mickey Mouse Clubhouse song "Hot Dog (Hot Diggity Dog)".

Two video examples of that song and the song's lyrics are included in this post. Additional videos and comments are included in this post and the Addendum to this post that refer to the cultural influences on the lyrics to that song, the "Hot Dog" dance as performed in these videos, and also to one of the costumes worn in the second video of that song and dance.

This song is a departure from the usual music featured in this blog which showcases Black music in the United States and around the world. While I believe that African American culture influenced some parts of Mickey Mouse Clubhouse's "Hot Dog (Hot Diggity Dog)" song, by no means do I think that that African American culture is the only cultural influence on this song.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic reasons.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the composers of this song. Thanks to all those quoted in this post and to the producers, singers, and musicians in each of these videos. Thanks also to the publishers of these videos on YouTube. Special thanks to my toddler granddaughter for introducing me to lots of creative children's songs and videos, including "Hot Dog (Hot Diggity Dog)".

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INFORMATION ABOUT MICKEY MOUSE CLUBHOUSE
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mickey_Mouse_Clubhouse
"Mickey Mouse Clubhouse is an American animated interactive television series produced from 2006 to Present. The series, Disney Television Animation's first computer animated series, was aimed at preschoolers....

Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck, Daisy Duck, Goofy, and Pluto star in the series, which focuses on interacting with the viewer to stimulate problem solving."
-snip-
The song "Hot Dog (Hot Diggity Dog)" is sung at the end of every episode of this series.

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Example #1: Mickey Mouse Clubhouse - 'Hot Dog Dance' - Disney Official



DisneyJuniorUK Published on Sep 12, 2012

Hot Dog Hot Dog Hot Diggidy Dog! Can you learn all of the moves and sing a long to the Hot Dog dance? Mickey and friends will show you how to do the Hot Dog dance!

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Example #2: Mickey Mouse Clubhouse - Halloween Hotdog Dance



DisneyJuniorUK, Published on Oct 30, 2013

Join Mickey Mouse and friends as they celebrate Halloween together!

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LYRICS - HOT DOG (HOT DIGGITY DOG) Version #1
(Mickey Mouse Clubhouse)

Hot Dog, Hot Dog, Hot Diggity Dog
Now, we've got ears, it's time for cheers
Hot Dog, Hot Dog, the problem's solved...
Hot Dog, Hot Dog, Hot Diggity Dog!

[character interruption]

Mickey: What a Hot Dog Day!

Hot Dog, Hot Dog, Hot Diggity Dog
It's a brand new day, what'cha waitin' for?
Get up, stretch out, stomp on the floor...
Hot Dog, Hot Dog, Hot Diggity Dog!

Hot Dog, Hot Dog, Hot Diggity Dog
We're splittin' the scene, we're full of beans
So long for now, from Mickey Mouse...

Mickey: That's me!

And the Mickey Mouse...Club...House!

Source: http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Hot_Dog_Dance

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LYRICS - HOT DOG (HOT DIGGITY DOG) Version #2
(Mickey Mouse Clubhouse)

Hot dog! (Hot dog) Hot dog!

Hot dog, hot dog, hot diggety dog
Now we got ears, it's time for cheers

Hot dog, hot dog, the problem's solved
Hot dog, hot dog, hot diggety dog

Grab my boots and a sandwich
Let's start a parade
Get the coconut drum kit
For Daisy to play

Hot dog, hot dog, hot diggety dog
We're taking off, we're dancing now
Hot dog, leapfrog, and holy cow
Hot dog, hot dog, hot diggety dog

Hot dog, hot dog, hot diggety dog
It's a brand new day
Whatcha waiting for?
Get up, stretch out, stomp on the floor

Hot dog, hot dog, hot diggety dog
Hot dog, hot dog, hot diggety dog
We're splitting the scene
We're full of beans

So long for now from Mickey Mouse
(That's me!)
And the Mickey Mouse Clubhouse

Source: http://tmbw.net/wiki/Lyrics:Hot_Dog!
-snip-
Both websites indicate that "Hot Dog" (Hot Diggity Dog) is sung by "They Might Be Giants". The song was recorded in 2006. The name of the song's composer isn't given on that website or on any other website about this song that I visted.

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CULTURAL INFLUENCES - THE SONG'S LYRICS [Version #2]
Hot dog
"hot dog - "sausage on a split roll," c.1890, popularized by cartoonist T.A. Dorgan. It is said to echo a 19c. suspicion (occasionally justified) that sausages contained dog meat. Meaning "someone particularly skilled or excellent" (with overtones of showing off) is from 1896. Connection between the two senses, if any, is unclear. Hot dog! as an exclamation of approval was in use by 1906." http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=hot+dog
**
From http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Hot_Dog_Dance
The song is title[d] "Hot Dog!" and is performed by They Might Be Giants. It echoes Mickey's first spoken words in the 1929 short The Karnival Kid."
-snip-
That cartoon video is found below under my comments about the dance that is performed in that Clubhouse cartoon.

**
Hot diggity dog
This phrase is lifted from the 1956 American Pop song "Hot Diggity (Dog Ziggity Boom)". The song was "recorded by Perry Como and went to #1 on the Billboard pop music chart later that year. The song's melody is based on Emmanuel Chabrier's 1883 composition, España...

The phrase "hot diggity dog!" dates to at least 1928, when Al Jolson was recorded saying "Hot diggity dog! Hot kitty! Hot pussycat! Didn't I tell you you'd love it?" after a performance of the tune "There's a Rainbow 'Round My Shoulder""... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_Diggity_(Dog_Ziggity_Boom).
-snip-
A video of Perry Como singing "Hot Diggity" is included in the Addendum to this post. A video of Emmanuel Chabrier's "España" is also included in the Addendum.

**
"it's time for cheers"
it's time for us to cheer; it's time for us to be happy (cheerful)

**
"Get the coconut drum kit"
A drum made out of coconut for Daisy [the female duck character in the Clubhouse] to play. A video of a coconut drum is included in the Addendum.

**
"Hot dog, leapfrog, and holy cow"
These words all refer to animals and probably have no other meaning in this song beyond that. However, both "hot dog" and "holy cow" are exclamations.

"Holy cow!" (and similar) is an exclamation of surprise used mostly in the United States, Canada, Australia and England. It is a minced oath or euphemism for "Holy Christ!"

Holy Cow! dates to at least 1905.[1]!...The phrase was used by baseball players at least as early as 1913[3] and probably much earlier.[4] The phrase appears to have been adopted as a means to avoid penalties for using obscene or indecent language and may have been based on a general awareness of the holiness of cows in some religious traditions.[5]"From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_cow_(expression)

"Leapfrog is a children's game in which players vault over each other's stooped backs." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leapfrog

**
"Stomp on the floor"
means to dance energetically
From http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/stomp
"Stomp - a jazz composition, especially in early jazz, marked by a driving rhythm and a fast tempo.

a dance to this music, usually marked by heavy stamping of the feet.

Origin 1820-1830"
-snip-
"Stomps" is a referent for music/dance originated in African American culture.

**
"We're splitting the scene"
means "We're leaving this place

Definition: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/split
"To split" meaning "to leave, to depart" probably originated in African American slang.

**
We're full of beans
In the context of this song, that sentence means "we're full of energy and enthusiasm". http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/be+full+of+beans.

However, saying that a person is full of beans may also be a serious insult since being "full of beans" also can mean being "full of 'crap'".

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THE TUNE USED FOR MICKEY MOUSE CLUBHOUSE "HOT DOG" SONG?
The words "hot diggity" in the Mickey Mouse Clubhouse song evoke the lyrics from the 1956 song "Hot Diggity (Dog Ziggity Boom)". However, the tune of Mickey Mouse song reminds me of an earlier song "Three Little Fishes". Here's a video of that song:

Andrews Sisters - Three Little Fishes



warholsoup100, Uploaded on May 28, 2011
-snip-
Information about The Andrews Sisters and the lyrics to the "Three Little Fishes" song are included in the publisher's statement for this video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaJ-Ou5gTdw

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THE "HOT DOG" DANCE
According to http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Hot_Dog_Dance
"The Hot Dog Dance" is the dance Mickey and the gang do at the end of every episode of Mickey Mouse Clubhouse. Every character has a different dance move he or she does to the song...

Trivia
How everyone performs the dance:
◾Mickey: Swings his body back and fourth while swaying his arms and kicking his feet out.
◾Minnie: Similar to Mickey, but swings out her arms while kicking her heels.
◾Goofy: Flaps his arms like a bird while squatting up and down and kicking out his legs.
◾Pluto: Squats up and down while leaning from side to side.
◾Donald: Swings his arms back and fourth while hopping on his feet.
◾Daisy: Sways her arms side to side and leans to the opposite side.

◾In Season 1, the dance was referred to as the "Mouskadance"."
-snip-
It seems to me that each Mickey Mouse Clubhouse character is doing his or her own version of the same dance.

I believe that this "Hot Dog" dance is another name for the "Hootchie Kootchie Dance" ("Shimmy Dance") that Minney Mouse does in Mickey Mouse's first cartoon "The Karnival Kid". (from about 1:05 to 1:29 in that video. After which Mickey Mouse calls out "Hot dogs Hot dogs" that he is selling from a cart. In the back of that cart is a sign "Minnie Shimmy Dancer".

Mickey Mouse The Karnival Kid (1929)



chitchcock92, Published on Jul 21, 2012

Mickey Mouse at age 1, said his first words in this cartoon. Mickey (voiced by Walt Disney) said "Hot dogs! Hot dogs"
-snip-
Here's a video of the Shimmy from the 1920s:

The Roaring Twenties - Dancing The Shimmy



Aaron1912,Published on Mar 10, 2012

Before the Charleston there was the Shimmy. Shake your body all over.
-snip-
The Shimmy dance originated among African Americans.

Characteters in the American children's educational cartoon characters "SuperWhy" do a similar dance while singing the song "Hip Hip Hooray" at the end of each of their cartoons. As is the case with the "Hot Dog" dance, each Super Why character does this dance their own way. Here's a video of that song and dance:

Superwhy Hip Hip Hooray



saggyhaggis, Uploaded on Aug 18, 2008

End theme from the kid's tv show Superwhy.
-snip-
The Super Why! cartoon series debuted in 2007. It may be a coincidence that these two cartoon series end each episode in what appears to me to be similar ways. Click http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Why! for information about Super Why! cartoons.

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WASHBOARD INSTRUMENT IN THE VIDEO OF MICKEY MOUSE CLUBHOUSE HALLOWEEN VERSION OF THIS SONG
[Example #2 above]
I found it interesting that Goofy [the tall dog character] is wearing a washboard (rubboard/frottoir) as part of his Halloween costume. Here's information about that musical instrument:
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washboard
"A washboard is a tool designed for hand washing clothing. With mechanized cleaning of clothing becoming more common by the end of the 20th century, the washboard has become better known for its originally subsidiary use as a musical instrument...

Washboards with brass ridges are still made, and some who use washboards as musical instruments prefer the sound of the somewhat more expensive brass boards. One of the few musical instruments invented entirely in the United States is the Zydeco Frottoir (Zydeco Rubboard), a distillation of the washboard into essential elements (percussive surface with shoulder straps) designed by Clifton Chenier and built by Willie Landry in 1946."
-snip-
A video of a Zydeco band including a musician playing a frottoir is found in the Addendum below.

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ADDENDUM: VIDEOS
Example #1: Emmanuel Chabrier - España Rhapsody For Orchestra



glagolitic, Published on Sep 10, 2013

The BBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leonard Slatkin
Recorded live at the Royal Albert Hall on Friday 19th July 2002
-snip-
"España" is the tune used for the 1956 song "Hot Diggity". Emmanuel Chabrier (January 18, 1841 – September 13, 1894) was a French Romantic composer and pianist...Gustav Mahler called España "the beginnings of modern music". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmanuel_Chabrier

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Example #2: Perry Como Live - Hot Diggity - 1956



furn738, Uploaded on Jun 2, 2011

The melody for Hot Diggity (Dog Ziggity Boom) is based on Emmanuel Chabrier's 1883 composition, "España."

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Example #3: COCONUT HAND DRUM



Sergi Garcia, Published on May 4, 2014

The drums of coconut are common throughout South-East Asia.
They are used to make rhythms.
Hand covering the opening can get different effects.
Includes stick.

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Example #4: Queen Ida and The Bon Temps Zydeco Band - Rosa Majeur



sexmex5, Uploaded on Apr 6, 2008

Good Zydeco

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