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Tuesday, December 7, 2021

Anthony Brown - "Blessings On Blessings (The B.O.B. Bounce)" Gospel Hip Hop song & dance video with lyrics & comments



Anthony Brown, June 21, 2019
New song “Blessings On Blessings (The B.O.B. Bounce)” from Anthony Brown & group therAPy. .. -snip- Statistics as of Dec. 7, 2021 at 2:42 PM EDT Total # of views - 15,019,211 
Total # of likes- 170K Total # of dislikes- 0 Total # of comments - 5,633 -snip- Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2021/12/reasons-that-baptists-and-some-other.html for a related pancocojams post titled "Reasons That Baptists And Some Other Christians Gave & May Still Give For Frowning Upon Or Prohibiting Dancing."

The excerpts in that post provide some context for the comments given below about Anthony Brown's "Blessings On Blessings (The B.O.B. Bounce)" Gospel Hip Hop song & dance video-and other Gospel Hip Hop songs or Gospel praise dancing/line dancing.
**** Edited by Azizi Powell This pancocojams post showcases the 2019 Gospel Hip Hop Song "Blessings On Blessings (The B.O.B. Bounce) by Anthony Brown. Information about Anthony Brown is included in this post along with the official YouTube video and partial lyrics for this song. Some selected comments from the discussion thread for the official YouTube video for "Blessings On Blessings" are also included in this post.

The content of this post is presented for religious, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

 All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Anthony Brown for his musical legacy. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT ANTHONY BROWN
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony_Brown_(gospel_musician)
"
Anthony Jamar Brown (born October 22, 1981) is an American urban contemporary gospel artist and musician, whose background singers are called Group Therapy, stylized group therAPy. He started his music career, in 2012, with the release of, Anthony Brown & Group TherAPy, by Tyscot Records. This was a Billboard breakthrough release, with chartings The Billboard 200, the Top Gospel Albums, and the Independent Albums chart. He is the worship leader at First Baptist Church of Glenarden, located in Upper Marlboro, Maryland, where he has served since June 2008."...

****
LYRICS: Blessings On Blessings (The B.O.B. Bounce) 
(composer: Anthony Brown)

Every time I turn around, every time I turn around
Ladies and gentlemen this is not a drill
Every time I turn around, every time I turn around
It's the B.O.B. Bounce and it's about to get real
Every time I turn around, every time I turn around
Let's Go, it's about to get real
Let's Go, it's about to get real
Ha it's about to get
Ha ha it's about to get real

(Oh) All my blessed people report to the dance floor
(Oh) All my blessed people report to the dance floor
(Oh) All my blessed people report to the dance floor

I, I don't know it. Well you about to learn

(Oh) All my blessed people report to the dance floor
(Oh) All my blessed people report to the dance floor
(Oh) All my blessed people report to the dance floor

Step, step, step, step up back stand still matter fact shoo
Everywhere you look you got a blessing on the way
Step up back stand still matter fact shoo
Everywhere you look you got a blessing on the way
Turn it out to the right uh huh clap clap
Step up and watch God step back and watch God
Turn it out to the left uh huh clap clap
It's a new direction with a brand new blessing

Step up back stand still matter fact shoo
Everywhere you look you got a blessing on the way
Step up back stand still matter fact shoo
Everywhere you look you got a blessing on the way
Turn it out to the right uh huh clap clap
Step up and watch God step back and watch God
Turn it out to the left uh huh clap clap
It's a new direction with a brand new blessing

(Oh) Everywhere you look you got a blessing on the way
(Oh) Everywhere you look you got a blessing on the way
(Oh) Step up and watch God step back and watch God

[...] 

You wanna see a blessing just look at me
You wanna see a blessing just look at me
You wanna see a blessing just look at me

Now stop
Humble is the way, stay low
The lower you get the more God's gonna bless you
The lower you get the more God's gonna bless you
The lower you get the more God's gonna bless you

Praises go up, the blessings come back down

[...] 

Up back stand still matter fact
Everywhere you look you got a blessing on the way
Up back stand still matter fact
Everywhere you look you got a blessing on the way

 

Turn it out to the right uh huh clap clap
Step up and watch God step back and watch God
Turn it out to the left uh huh clap clap
It's a new direction with a brand new blessing

 [...]

It's the B.O.B. bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce
It's the B.O.B. bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce
It's the B.O.B. bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce
It's the B.O.B. bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce

-snip-
Click 
https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/anthonybrown/blessingsonblessingsthebobbounce.html for the complete lyrics for this song. 

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS YOUTUBE VIDEO'S DISCUSSION THREAD

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p58HS6h3l10&ab_channel=AnthonyBrownVEVO

These comments are given in relative chronological order, except for responses. Numbers are added for referencing purposes only.

2019

1. Dorothy Aguilar
"Dancing in the spirit of the Lord πŸŒΏπŸŒΎπŸ™πŸŒΏπŸƒπŸ‘ΌπŸƒπŸ’«πŸ™πŸ’«"

**
2. Trap man Van
"This is feeling like the blessed version of the electric slide and a more laid back anointed version of the Cupid shuffleπŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ™ŒπŸ™ŒπŸ™Œ yesssss let the holy ghost filled cookouts begin.. I'm ready now love this!!!!"

**
Reply
3. Cookie
"
God bless this ministry that draw the youth toward Christ❤"

**
4. Insert Name Here
"...yall jus make sure yall keep that body roll part as sanctified as possible πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚"

**
Reply
5. Derreille Newton
"πŸ˜…πŸ˜…πŸ˜…πŸ˜…"

**
Reply
6. Essence G
"
I cant stop laughing at your comment man this is so worldly πŸ˜‚"

**
7. Irese Obanor
"To all those complaining about how “worldly” this is, you must not be listening to the lyrics.... You just can’t be. God is being glorified, and that’s all that matters."

**
8.  Insert Name Here
"@Essence G  ...u should have saw me dancingπŸ’ƒ... I started hitting some questionable moves.πŸ˜‚ (...so, I thought I'd warn yall)"

**
Reply
9. Chasity Buckley
"Lolol!! I was thinking the same! πŸ˜‚ They kept it pretty holy haha"

**
Reply
10. Tenia Hoskins
"Facts🀣🀣 I’m trying 🀣🀣 keep the body roll pgπŸ™ŒπŸΎπŸ™ŒπŸΎ"

**
Reply
11. Ona Baptiste
"Sabrina Parker πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ I receive this because when I heard it yesterday I forgot it was a gospel song!πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚"
-snip-
Based on this comment & some other comments, "Sabrina Parker" was a previous screen name for "Insert Name Here".

**
Reply
12. Latonya Black
"The way these folks playing today...they better hope they are serious at the altar. God is growing weary of double minded ppl."

**
Reply
13. Diedrie Gibbs
"Yes. That could go awfully worldly quick, fast and in a hurry. 🀣🀣🀣🀣"

**
Reply
14. sutherngrace8
"and maybe a little more shirt on the girl in the vid..God doesn't want an immodestly dressed woman dancing and taking His glory by showing herself. Men will watch that and their mind will wander away from the message. I like the song tho."

**
Reply
15. Yahu ._.*
"Humbly, I say y'alls forgetting about King David's dancing!!! Facts: God already knows your heart. Give God the Glory in all you do, Amen!"

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Reply
16. Tequila Bryant
"It's definitely worldly he just put Gods name in it"

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Reply
17.  Truther2020, 2020
"@Essence G  cause they dont have NO business doing it.. They shouldnt have to TRY and keep it sactified... Smh.. This world is DONE!"

**
Reply
18. Essence G, 2020
"sfrederick2018 right .. people need to be saved fr and stop playing church"

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Reply
20. T Chappell, 2020
"@Insert Name Here  I understood what you meant as soon as I read it. It was funny but true. Dance but watch your moves...simple."

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Reply
21. Jasmine Allen, 2020
"They were so stiff doing the dance outside on the grass.. they did a good job keeping it clean and holy lol"

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Reply
22.  Starr, 2020
"πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚riiiiiiight

Cause i didnt realize i was slowly twerking after the body roll"

**
Reply
23. M Coleman, 2020
"Yessssss!!!! I have to restrict myself from getting secular on it!!"

**
Reply
24. Staying Faithful2TMHG, 2020
"coolbreeze Sounds I agree, the song is amazing as long as they keep them body parts together to where God can get the Glory from their praises. Love it!"

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Reply
25. Classy-4-Life, 2020
"No twerkin up off in here!πŸ˜‚"

**
Reply
26. Sheryl Martin, 2020
"You know sanctified means separate from the world and that's where it's definitely a thin line because it can easily be crossed. Some people in the  Body Of Christ ( I'm not complaining just explaining ) don't understand such! We must separate our self from the world even though we are in the world we are not of the world.  The song is inspiring!"

**
Reply
27. Kay, 2020
"That's right, a body roll has been known to get out of control"

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Reply
28. Kyasia, 2020
"πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ Amen!"

**
Reply
29. Nne4DKing, 2021
"The music the so called "Christian's" play today is kinda weird now......,I mean the rap sound,That's a rlly weird thing,keep it sanctified,I agree"

**
30. Susan P
"PRAISE HIM. Back in the day before you knew Jesus you would dance to the devil music all night. Now  that you save you don"t want to dance to Jesus and don't want anyone else to dance to him. You better get up and DANCE. King DAVID danced before God praising him until he danced out of his clothes. Read your bible and leave God's people alone that want to praise him in a Dance."

**
Reply
31. Theresa Bass
"Susan P        It's not the fact of dancing, but it's the kind of dancing.    Worldly dancing and praise dancing should not look the same.   There should be a difference."

**
Reply
32. desi_black girl
"Too I could hear them church mother's b like ......what the what good lawwwddddd"

**
Reply
33. 1stP3&10
"Oops! I was like... what was that??

Lol. No way. I cant be doing a pelvic drop swirl on a praise dance.  😁  im so glad o am not the only one!"

**
Reply
34. Yah's Woman
"I hate to be a killjoy, but this is just another example of the christians of today looking to things that don't really magnify the most high, it caters to fleshly and worldly desires. I bet a call to real prayer and supplication would not get this kind of response! What our heavenly Father is calling us to in these last days is repentance and returning to his way, but people are drawn to foolishness and it is a trick of the Devil. Mat 7:13 Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide [is] the gate, and broad [is] the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat"

**
Reply
35. Susan P
"@Insert Name Here . I cannot look into these people heart and say they are not dancing unto the Lord. You cannot see in their heart. God said  be careful and don't judge. He is the only one who knows the heart of man. You are treading on dangerous ground.  Would you rather they be out there dancing to ungodly music . Your job as a christian is to not condemn. Is anybody reading the whole Bible  anymore?  Lets all go back."

**
Reply
36. Betty Russell
"@Susan P  Thank God he danced a holy dance before God, there is a difference. we will be judged by God if its ungodly. Thank God for His Spirit inside!!πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™"


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Reply
37. 
Franciscus Jackson
"why... yall same folks who hit the club"

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Reply
38. Kimani F
"@Franciscus Jackson  I don't do clubs anymore. That was my old life....."

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Reply
39. Insert Name Here
"@Franciscus Jackson  πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚speak on it"

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Reply
40. Laura Clayton
"Amen keep it clean"

**
Reply
41.️ Rhonda Wagner
"I agree with Sabrina. I enjoy people having fun. Especially our young people. Because it is cool to be save. Although, what if God is not happy with your praise? If HE'S not pleased with your singing and rejoicing is not unto HIM. You're just satisfying your flesh. Keep it Holy! There still should be a different look from the world. Remember we are a creative being. We don't have to look and act like the world. Great song and some people did keep in a respectful move/look!"

**
Reply
42. Insert Name Here
"@Susan P  ...David danced before the Lord with all his might. Danced  til his clothes began to fall off of him (not caring what others thought about him) - there's a difference between that and twerking to a gospel song because u like the lyrics and beat. [That's what this comment thread is about]  I'm sure before you got saved u had a sense of humor.πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚"

**
43. telle895
"
It's funny how so many ppl are downgrading this but still get in their car  jam Beyonce & other secular music but can't turn up for God. If my spirit is gaining more love for God & his kingdom. Im gonna jam it. So judging ppl on how they choose to praise the Lord."

**
Reply
44. 
Garry Wright
"Yo
u are telling the truth!"

**
Reply
45. 
R*chelle: πŸ¦‹ YAH's daughter
"M
aybe they just don't like the song. I love Anthony Brown's music, I really do, and when this was sent to me, I fully expected to like the song, but this one isn't for me. Not bashing,  I'm definitely happy to see so many enjoying it. I pray the best for him with his music always. It's a happy and uplifting song, I'm just not feeling the beat or the overall sound. I love music that bumps and praises YAH at the same time, but for some reason, this one isn't making me want to turn up the volume and move. But blessings everyone, keep enjoying!πŸ™ŒπŸ½πŸ™ŒπŸ½πŸ™ŒπŸ½πŸ™ŒπŸ½

**
Reply
46. Stephen Ray
"You got it twisted, acting like it's secular vs Christian music. Overall music is music. NF, Lecrae, Tedashii, Flame, and many others are rappers who are also Christian. We do wrong to act like Christian Rap is its own genre and doesn't compare. It ask competes against each other, so stop taking away from the talent these artists have."

**
Reply
47. Plus, even within just Christian music, you still have Flame, Tedashii, NF, Andy Mineo, Benjah, Alex Faith, Group 1 Crew, Json, R. Swift, Trip Lee, Hee Sun Lee, Bryann Trejo, and plenty others I could list who sound better than this.

Keep in mind, I'm just referring to this song at least. I'll have to listen to others from him later but this was too much repetition and he was imitating other artists rather than coming up with his own sound."

**
Reply
48. Hair Poetry
"telle895 I bet if they were bucking and jumping all over the place it’ll be considered “church “ or shouting! We don’t realize how free we are to dance in the Lord when our hearts are in the right place (dancing unto the Lord)"

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Reply
49. Christine Smith
"@Hair Poetry  Amen.. The word says we are to use our voice, musical instruments, our hands and dance into the lord.. we are so conditioned to religious rituals versus biblical principles.. If ppl dont like, dancing , shouting, singing and loud praising they may not like heaven  because the bible says there will be all of that... I never understood  how ppl could dance and pop in the club but think it is not okay to dance for  the Lord."

**
Reply
50. ImadeULook
"Amen that's what's wrong with these churches today they get too secular"

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Reply
51. Shelton
"telle895 God instructs us on how to praise Him. It's not just something you "choose" how to do. He doesn't accept his people giving him what the world gives unto idols....

Take heed to thyself that thou be not snared by following them, after that they be destroyed from before thee; and that thou enquire not after their gods, saying, How did these nations serve their gods? even so will I do likewise.  Thou shalt not do so unto the Lord thy God: for every abomination to the Lord , which he hateth, have they done unto their gods; for even their sons and their daughters they have burnt in the fire to their gods.  What thing soever I command you, observe to do it: thou shalt not add thereto, nor diminish from it.
Deuteronomy 12:30-32 KJV

**
Reply
52. Ren Jackson
"Haters......they will always be. I love this beat, lyrics and moves."

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Reply
53. lastof16
"@Stephen Ray  I am not defending this song lyrics. The difference is the lyrics not music. The sound that comes from the instruments makes the music; however its the lyrics or words that makes it Christian/Gospel or secular.  What I would say is if the lyrics doesn't list Christ in it how can it be Christian/Gospel lyrics?  Then again there are Christian/Gospel lyrics that doesn't mention Jesus; however other words that deems it Christian/Gospel referencing the Lords goodness and inspiration in the lyrics."

**
Reply
54. Tiffany Aelise, 2020
"Stephen Ray Do you know the difference between Anthony and all of those other artists you just named? Anthony Brown is STRICTLY Christian and doesn’t act as if he’s embarrassed to fully REP God. No it is not ok to publicly rep God while still repping the world because you got people like yourself and a whole bunch of kids who are confused and defending the wrong thing against people who are trying to tell you right. You have people that you’re influencing that are believing that it’s ok to be labeled a Christian rapper but still record secular music. It’s not. Their sound may sound better (in your opinion. I think Anthony sounds better) but their messages are not the same. As a Christ representative, we’re supposed to be winning souls for Christ, and if that’s not what you wanna do, cool, but you need to change your genre or pick a side."

**
55. C K
"The lower you get....get on them knees and pray❤"

**
Reply
56. Rosemary Hall
"My dad would say: you need some kneeology."

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Reply
57. Makeda Dey
"Yeah it hear that BUT the DL suggestive movements n thangz puts a different spin on "the lower you get/go"...."

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Reply
58. Jonathan Jacob
"Makeda Dey  that’s the questionable part . God raises us up. That part is sexually suggestive. You can’t drop it low or twerk it to a gospel song"

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Reply
59. Florence Johnson
"Jonathan Jacob I may be wrong but I thought he's saying "the more you give the more God's gonna bless you." That would be more fitting to the rest of the lyrics. πŸ€·πŸΎ‍♀"

**
R️eply
60. Jonathan Jacob
"@Florence Johnson  actually its a spin on the cha cha slide. So yes you go down low come back up. Its a secular move."

****
2020
61. 
Teresa Loving
"
How cool!! Dancing for Christ!!πŸ™ŒπŸ’ƒπŸ’ƒπŸ™ŒπŸ˜"

**
62. 
Mia grace
"
This is my all time fav song!!! No bad words and talks about JESUS!!! Now that’s my type of jam"

**
63. 
Alyssa
"
Yes I'm a Christian and I love this song too ❤️πŸ’•"

**
64. 
Willa_WolfSquad❤️
"
IM A CHRISTIAN AND THIS IS MY NUMBER 1 SONG we would play this while we r skating or when family comes over and we r dancing"

**
65. LadyKarerowline
"A great exercise spinning, and skating rink party song!"

**
Reply
66. Anita Mlauzi, 2021
"Bouncing right here! For God has blessed me abundantly 😊"

**
67. Gabriel Alele
"The  Timing of this Song🎢πŸ”₯ is

PerfectoπŸ‘ŒπŸΏ esp during this Quarantine season."

****

2021

68. Nne4DKing
"The music the so called "Christian's" play today is kinda weird now......,I mean the rap sound,That's a rlly weird thing,keep it sanctified,I agree"

**
69. Lisa MacCallum
"A lot of pastors and other Christian say you can’t dance I don’t believe that at all! I love this! Thank you!"

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Reply
70. Nne4DKing
"Me to!!"

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Reply
71. 
Dfunk Fatsack
"Yeah I remember the first time a guitar and drums were played in church some older folks walked out"

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72. LL
"It just depends on who you're dancing FOR, The Bible says PRAISE HIS NAME in the dance♥️ That is when you LOVE HIM and are born of HIS SPIRIT... That's what we'll obeyπŸ™HIS WORD πŸ™"

**
Reply
73.  J. Cunningham
"This makes me so HAPPY! Straight jiggin' for the Lord! AYYYYYYYYEEEE!"

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Reply
74. Priscilla Estrada
"David danced!"

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Reply
75. Layla Scott
"That’s crazy. Obviously certain kind of dancing wouldn’t be favored, but we as Christians..can indeed dance lol"

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76. Liz Darealistchicuknow
"The problem is that some pastors have stepped away from the ancestors.  They danced in church it was just a little different.  Praising God don't have rules.  God uses everyone different to spread the word."

**
77. Cynthia Smith
"It's my first time listening and i am jumping because every direction i turn there's a blessing.  πŸ’ƒπŸ’ƒπŸ’ƒπŸ’ƒπŸ’ƒ"

**
78. Empress Gellineau
"Praise God πŸ™πŸ™"

**
79. Eni-b
"On repeat and did an exercise routine on this song,praise God my spirit is filled!"

**
80. 
Vilmarie Mangual Paris
"While your cleaning your house, this is part of my cleaning music mix, as a teacher doing my lesson plans"

**
81. TB Moffitt III
"This is a Christian music video?? hmm"

**
82. Babby Girl Haden
"Blessing on BlessingπŸ’žπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸŒŽ✌πŸ™ŒπŸ’žπŸ’žπŸŒŽπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ✌πŸ“€πŸ‘°πŸ‘¨‍πŸ‘©‍πŸ‘§‍πŸ‘§πŸ‘¨‍πŸ‘©‍πŸ‘§‍πŸ‘§πŸ˜‡"

****

Thanks for visiting pancocojams. 

Visitor comments are welcome. 

Reasons That Baptists And Some Other Christians Gave & May Still Give For Frowning Upon Or Prohibiting Dancing

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams posts presents some online excerpts that explore the reasons that Baptists (and some other Christian denominations) gave and may still give for frowning upon or prohibiting dancing.

The Addendum to this post presents some responses to the quora.com question "What's the difference between Baptist and Southern Baptist?"

This pancocojams post provides some historical background and other context that help to explain some of the comments from African Americans and other Americans that are posted to YouTube discussion threads about praise dancing, Gospel line dancing, Gospel Hip Hop songs and certain other "secular" sounding religious songs. 

The content of this post is presented for historical, cultural, and educational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.
-snip-
Click the "African American praise dancing" and the "Black Gospel mine" tags below for some pancocojams posts about those subjects. 

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ONLINE EXCERPTS
These excerpts are given in no particular order and are numbered for referencing purposes only.

EXCERPT #1
From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dancing_ban

[...]

"
Religious Bans

 Christianity

Various Christian groups believe that dancing is either inherently sinful or that certain forms of dancing could lead to sinful thoughts or activities, and thus proscribe it either in general or during religious services. These include some[which?] adherents of Mennonite, Hutterite, Baptist, Seventh-day Adventist, Church of Christ, Restorationist, and Holiness movement sects.

 The Church of the Nazarene, a Methodist denomination originating in the Holiness Movement, recommends against "All forms of dancing that detract from spiritual growth and break down proper moral inhibitions and reserve."[3]

 A 19th century catholic theologian similarly teaches:[4]

 There are balls which are gravely licentious, either on account of immodest dances or of the costumes and dresses introduced at them. In these no one should take part. Even modest dances are rarely without danger, and a Christian should not frequent them from choice and of his own free will.[4]"

Many Christian churches determine doctrine locally and may be non-denominational, and these vary on their stances on social dancing.

In contrast, some strains of Charismatic Christianity practice rituals in which the Holy Spirit is believed to cause spontaneous dancing, among other behaviors.

Mormonism advocated dance and participated in recreational dancing since it was organized in 1830. Founder Joseph Smith was a skillful dancer and enjoyed hosting dances in his home. Dancing continues as an integral part of youth and adult activities in the Church. [5]."

****
EXCERPT #2
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worship_dance
"Dance has historically been controversial within Christianity. Many records exist of prohibitions by leaders of most branches of the Christian Church, for such reasons as the association of dance with paganism, the use of dance for sexual purposes, and a Greek-influenced belief in the separation of soul and body. Beginning in the second half of the 20th century, and especially following the Second Vatican Council, there was a significant growth in the use of dance in Christian worship. This received a boost from the charismatic movement of the 1970s, which initiated a transition to contemporary worship in many churches."...

 ****
EXCERPT #3
[Pancocojams Editor's Note: The following comments are selected responses from that quora.com page.  Based on their accompanying photographs, it appears that all of the responses to this question are from White people. Numbers are added for referencing purposes only.]

From : https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-scriptural-justification-for-some-Christians-forbidding-or-looking-down-on-dancing "What Is The Scriptural justification for some Christians forbidding or looking down on dancing?"

1. Nathan Ketsdever, lifelong theological questioner, writer, & arm chair philosopher

Answered Nov 7, 2014

"Update:

 The Southern Baptist Convention doesn't take a stance:

The Southern Baptist Convention has not taken an official stance on these matters. Because each church is autonomous, each issue is addressed and determined by the local church.

Original answer:

As someone at the heart of the Bible belt geographically--I am not sure how this came about culturally, but it probably arose due the admonitions in the Bible to not lust. The challenge is that the Old Testament certainly has examples of dancing. I don't know how they doctrinally got around those examples.

A Google search reveals that Southern Baptist even has a Dance Ministry, which suggests that any "rule" has long sense given way to individual interpretation.

I don't think this is one that sits well with the average church goer or the pastoral staff in the SBC. I don't think this is a serious issue. It may have been one in the 60s or 70s, but I don't imagine its treated by the majority of staff or church goers as guidance on the issue."

**
2. Rebecca Billy, , Minor in religious education.

Answered Nov 7, 2014

"I know it's been looked down upon for some time, even recently, but it has less to do with actual scriptural rules against dancing than with the tendency of Southern Baptists to avoid anything which might be construed as "causing one to stumble" in the faith. Thus, drinking is prohibited based upon Paul's admonition to not be drunk with wine, and dancing is prohibited based upon the idea that it might encourage lust in observers."

**
3. Keith Rockefeller,  studied History & Political Science at Nebraska Wesleyan University (1990)

Answered Dec 20, 2018

"I grew up in a GARBC Baptist Church, which is a denomination many people would consider legalistic.

The rationale is that Christians should be separated from the world and its practices in order to be godly. For this reason, many Baptists and other Christians added additional rules for the practice of their faith that excluded certain practices such as dancing, listening to pop or rock music, using tobacco, going to movies, using alcoholic beverages, owning televisions, using playing cards, using tarot cards, reading horoscopes, using profanity of any kind, and not associating with those who do. They also stressed that one should not work on Sundays, go out to eat, do any kind of heavy house work, going to stores, engaging in any kind of commerce, and such like, should dress modestly, men should keep their hair cut short and even not have facial hair, women should not wear men’s clothes, and should go to church wearing dress clothes and never appear wearing blue jeans, shorts, or sportswear. .

The problem was that these rules are not found in the Bible. They tended to create resentment among believers, and drove many from their ranks."

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4. Reginald McRee, , studied Business at University of Southern Mississippi,

Answered May 2 [no year given]

"I was raised and still am an Independent Baptist, and we typically do not dance. I have seen Independent Baptists get pretty boisterous and jump up and down, and even run aisles in church, but ABSOLUTELY no dancing with anyone at a prom or school dance. Why? Because it apparently causes sexual tension. One pastor I used to sit under used Proverbs 6:27 to preach against dancing. “Can a man take fire in his bosom, and his clothes not be burned?” Personally, I believe it depends on the type of dancing you partake in."

Understand, though, that most Southern Baptists seem not to be truly against dancing as much as it is just generally discouraged by church leadership. Much of that is just because the church leadership tends toward being old and male, and dancing was once considered rather risquΓ©.

EDIT: The original question referred to Southern Baptists, so that us what is reflected in my answer."

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EXCERPT #4
From https://baptistnews.com/article/dancing-baptists/#.Ya0q0tDMK1s "Dancing Baptists?" by Nora O. Lozano, August 5, 2015
"Two weeks ago, during the celebrations of the BWA World Congress and the Women’s Department Leadership Conference, many Baptists from around the world worshipped together with our Baptist sisters and brothers from South Africa. Some had the privilege of physically attending these events, while others, like me, were online participants as the congress worship services were streamed live, and videos of the women’s conference were posted on Facebook.

I am sure there were many things that caught the eye of the attendees (physical and online). For me, one of them was the worship style full of festive colors, music and dancing. During the transmission of the services, the cameras were not only focused toward the stage, but also to the audience. I found it fascinating how different brothers and sisters reacted to this kind of worship style. Some were comfortably dancing, while others were as stiff as they could be.

In my corner of the world, many Baptists struggle with dancing. Some of them do not see any problem with social dancing at parties and weddings but may struggle with dancing in the church, perhaps not with an occasional special piece, but with generalized dancing during the worship service. Some other Baptists, like many Latinos/as, struggle with the whole idea of dancing (liturgically or socially).

This struggle was present as I was growing up. I was taught in my conservative Mexican Baptist church that Baptists do not dance. In fact, dancing was considered a sin. In my child and teenage mind, this restriction applied to social dancing; liturgical dance was not even a part of the picture, but if it were, it would be considered sinful, too.

Even though the Bible mentions different references about dancing (Exodus 15:20; 2 Samuel 6:14; Ecclesiastes 3:4; Psalm 150:4; Matthew 11:17; Luke 15:25), I believe there are historical reasons that led to the adoption of this restriction: 1) the teachings from foreign Baptist missionaries, mainly from the United States; 2) an anti-Catholic sentiment that motivated Baptists to attempt to differentiate themselves by not doing what Catholics were doing (social dancing); 3) An additional effort of differentiation, but this time from Pentecostal and Charismatic traditions, by avoiding any strident music or physical movement during worship time.

As I moved to new places due to studies or ministry opportunities, I continued to be surrounded with Baptists who in general were uncomfortable with dancing, and lately, with some others who are attempting to challenge this uneasiness. For instance, in the recent CBF General Assembly there was a workshop titled, “Baptists Learning to Dance.”

While this is the reality for some Baptists, it is not for many others around the world who feel very comfortable dancing. Through the years and different experiences, I have learned to see dancing as part of culture. Two events helped reinforce this idea. I had the privilege of attending both the 2005 BWA World Congress and the Women’s Leadership Conference in Birmingham, England. During the latter event, the attendees enjoyed presentations from the different regional fellowships. When it was time for the Caribbean Baptist Fellowship women to present, they burst into the meeting hall dancing. Once they stopped, the group’s leader explained that Caribbean people do everything in dance, so it was natural for them to dance during their presentation and worship time.

Later that year, I spoke in a Women’s Leadership Conference in Hyderabad, India. While there were women from different denominations, most of the attendees were Baptists. The event lasted five days, and by the second day some of them asked me: “How do they dance in your church?” I laughed on the inside. I just could not imagine the people of my San Antonio Baptist church, nor the people from my church in Monterrey, MΓ©xico, dancing during their worship services. So I replied: “We do not dance.” They were astonished! From that moment on, it seemed that they were trying to find an opportunity to get me to dance during the worship services, and they did! Perhaps they were trying to fix my worship practices.

The issue of culture is fascinating and perplexing. For some reason, God, in spite of the challenging complexities, made us cultural human beings. Perhaps it was to keep us humble as no human being can know all cultures. Maybe it was to keep us intrigued so that we could learn from each other. Unfortunately, instead of learning, often we feel threatened, and tend to lessen/devalue/dismiss the other’s perspective, worldview, and practices, in summary, his/her culture.

As I/we continue to attempt to understand and appreciate the rich cultural and liturgical diversity of the Baptist family worldwide, I hope that the practice of dancing by some will not become an issue of judgment and division, nor an occasion to devalue others’ cultural practices.

For some Baptists, the issue of “no dancing” has been a defining feature. Years ago, I had a conversation with a college classmate about our religious traditions. When I shared that I was a Baptist, he told me: “So you belong to the group who do not dance, drink or smoke” (of course, I do not see these three in the same cluster, but space limitations forbid me to write about the other two). His categorization saddened me. I wished he had said: “So you belong to the group who are compassionate, loving, respectful, peaceful, supporting and helping of each other and the community.”… 

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ADDENDUM : RESPONSES TO THE QUESTION "WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BAPTIST AND SOUTHERN BAPTIST?"
From https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-difference-between-Baptist-and-Southern-Baptist 

1. Fred Smith, Southern Baptist since 1971

Answered Jul 9, 2019

Originally Answered: What is the difference between Baptist and Southern Baptist?

There are many kinds of Baptists. They share similar doctrines but are part of different organizations. The Southern Baptists are the largest group of Baptists in the nation. Other Baptist groups include the National Baptists, the General Association of Regular Baptists, the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, the Primitive Baptists and many others.”…

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2. Thomas Wall, Christian for over Sixty Years

Answered Feb 15, 2019

"It not possible, or at least not practical to answer the question as stated since there are at least Sixty-Two (62) different Baptist Denominations! Here is just a little about Three (3) of the largest, with the Southern Baptist as by far the largest of these three.

Southern Baptist

The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a Christian denomination based in the United States. With more than 15 million members as of 2015, it is the world's largest Baptist denomination, the largest Protestant denomination in the United States, and the second largest Christian denomination in the United States after the Catholic Church.

The word Southern in Southern Baptist Convention stems from it having been organized in 1845 at Augusta, Georgia, by Baptists in the Southern United States who split with northern Baptists over the issue of slavery, specifically whether Southern slave owners could serve as missionaries.

Since the 1940s, the Southern Baptist Convention has shifted from some of its regional and historical identification, especially since the late 20th century, the SBC has sought new members among minority groups and to become much more diverse. In addition, while still heavily concentrated in the Southern United States, the Southern Baptist Convention has member churches across the United States and 41 affiliated state conventions. Southern Baptist churches are evangelical in doctrine and practice. As they emphasize the significance of the individual conversion experience, which is affirmed by the person having complete immersion in water for a believer's baptism, they reject the practice of infant baptism. Other specific beliefs based on biblical interpretation can vary somewhat due to their congregational polity, which allows local autonomy.

The average weekly attendance is over 5 million.

National Baptist

The National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc., more commonly known as the National Baptist Convention (NBC USA or NBC), is the largest predominantly African-American Christian denomination in the United States. It is headquartered at the Baptist World Center in Nashville, Tennessee and affiliated with the Baptist World Alliance. The denomination claims approximately 31,000 congregations and reports having an estimated 7.5 million members.

American Baptist

The northern Baptist are now understood to be The American Baptist Churches USA (ABCUSA) with about 1.2 million members.

After the American Civil War, another split occurred when most freedmen set up independent black congregations, regional associations, and state and national conventions, such as the National Baptist Convention, which became the second largest Baptist convention by the end of the 19th century. Others joined new African-American denominations, chiefly the African Methodist Episcopal Church, which was established in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the early 19th century, as the first independent black denomination in the United States."
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The bold font was used in this response.

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Sunday, December 5, 2021

The History Of Church Praise Dancing (with special focus on African American church praise dancing)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams posts presents three online excerpts and one complete newspaper article about the history of praise dancing,  with special focus on African American praise dancing.

The content of this post is presented for historical, cultural, and educational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.
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Click the "African American praise dancing" and "Black Gospel mine" tags below for more pancocojams posts on this subject.   
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Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2021/12/reasons-that-baptists-and-some-other.html for a related pancocojams post titled "
Reasons That Baptists And Some Other Christians Gave & May Still Give For Frowning Upon Or Prohibiting Dancing."

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THREE ONLINE EXCERPTS/ AND ONE COMPLETE ARTICLE ABOUT PRAISE DANCING IN CHURCH

This online material is given in no particular order. Numbers are added for referencing purposes only.

EXCERPT #1
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worship_dance
"Worship dance or liturgical dance take on several forms of sacred dance in Christianity and Messianic Judaism, and is usually incorporated into liturgies or worship services.

Some liturgical dance was common in ancient times or non-Western settings, with precedents in Judaism beginning with accounts of dancing in the Old Testament. An example is the episode when King David danced before the Ark of the Covenant (2 Sam 6:14), but this instance is often considered to be outside of Jewish norms and Rabbinic rituals prescribed at the time.

Dance has historically been controversial within Christianity. Many records exist of prohibitions by leaders of most branches of the Christian Church, for such reasons as the association of dance with paganism, the use of dance for sexual purposes, and a Greek-influenced belief in the separation of soul and body. Beginning in the second half of the 20th century, and especially following the Second Vatican Council, there was a significant growth in the use of dance in Christian worship. This received a boost from the charismatic movement of the 1970s, which initiated a transition to contemporary worship in many churches."...

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EXCERPT #2
From https://classroom.synonym.com/praise-dance-history-12080860.html "Praise Dance History" by 
Joy Granger [no publishing date given]
"The history of praise dance dates back to biblical times. The first mention of dance in the Bible is in the book of Exodus when Miriam, sister of Moses, took a tambourine and led the women of Israel into a dance after witnessing the parting of the Red Sea. They expressed joy and celebration in their dance after witnessing God’s great miracle on their behalf.

Biblical Records

Other Biblical records of dancing occurred after David slew the giant Goliath and the women sang "to one another in dance" (1 Samuel 29:5). King David also danced before the Lord, as he brought the Ark of the Covenant into Jerusalem, recorded in 2 Samuel 6:14 of the Bible. In his writings found in the book of Psalms, King David has many references to dancing as a form of worship to God. One such reference that remains popular in teachings today is "Let them praise his name in the dance: let them sing praises unto him with the timbrel and harp" (Psalm 149:3).

The New Testament gives just a few direct references to dance. However, deeper studies into the original language of the New Testament suggest more references to dance than originally thought. Closer examination of the Aramaic language which Jews spoke, reveal the word for 'rejoice' and 'dance' are the same, in such references as dancing and leaping for joy (Luke 6:23) as well as 'dancing in the Spirit' (Luke 10:21).

 Signficance

During the first 500 years of the Christian church, praise or liturgical dance remained an important part of church gatherings, due to its Judeo-Christian traditions. Christians were accustomed to celebrating in dance at worship and festivals because of the Hebrew traditions of dance.

Later Developments

The history of praise dance takes a dramatic change during 16th and 17th centuries. The Roman Church organized the movements of the priest into something more "formal." By the 18th century, praise dances became scarce in the churches, with the exception of the Shakers where religious dance remained part of their worship.

[…]

Contemporary Praise Dancing

With the renewal of the church in the twentieth century, dance began to find increasing acceptance in the worship services of the church again. It has a rich and biblical tradition. Dance offers a range of forms and expressions in worship, from carefully choreographed dramatic presentation to the spontaneous worship and celebration of individuals and congregations of all ages."

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EXCERPT #3
From https://obsidiantea.com/praise-dance/ "What Is Praise Dance?"
December 13, 2018/Black Culture
…"Black church is a unique experience that is totally unlike white American church. It’s something that influences us all even if we aren’t Christian. It’s a major cultural touchstone and having left the church a few years prior this was my first time seeing praise dancing, specifically Mime. I attended an older church and so we had more singing than dance.

Praise Dancing became popular in the 1970s in the Black community as another way to express love and worship towards God. In Black culture the arts have always had a relationship with the church and many of us get our start there. It was only right that at some point, a specific style would emerge just around worship and dance.

It’s also known as Liturgical, although seemingly no one outside of acedemia really calls it that. It’s the idea of mixing dance and worship and has been around in some form or another for likely as long as worship has been a thing. But, for Africans Americans there was an issue. You guessed it? Slavery. As Africans were stolen to the Americas, and many of us lost family members and traditions, we settled here to find that dance was not allowed. Or at least our dances, weren’t.

In many African cultures, dance and ritual were one in the same. When we were brought over, we were stripped of our religion and in time our dance. It was only once some people decided to convert us to Christianity that we found a work around. We were allowed to dance if we adhered to some rules, such as not crossing the feet. In time it was the rituals and cultures of Africa that were hidden under the guise of Christianity. It became mixed and what we think of as Black church today.

Praise Dancing Today

So, today Praise Dancing tends to incorporate a few different styles of Black dance. Some common stylings are modern, jazz, hip-hop and Caribbean dances. It’s said this was the influence of the Alvin Ailey choreography Revelations. Other big influences were the Arthur Mitchelle Dance Theater of Harlem and the Sacred Dance Guild. It’s created a style that is expressive, and choreographed. Some styles tend to be divided along gender lines, but it is avalible for anyone to do and perform as an expression of worship. Obvisiouly it’s most easily found in church although some Black talent shows will often feature it too.

Additionally now there have been some subcultures formed. Mime is a big one. It leans less on modern and more on performing the song with lip syncing and gestures. This really came out of the 1980s and started with K&K mime and has since become an amazing subgenere.

There is also Krump. And high energy expressive style that was originally praise dancing also. It comes out of clowning and was considered too raw, so it’s creators developed their own style. It’s since then develop into something amazing and has it’s own off shoots.”…
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That post includes several video examples of Black American praise dancing. Unfortunately, most of those videos are no longer available.

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COMPLETE ARTICLE #4
From https://www.nytimes.com/2002/06/02/arts/dance-stepping-and-stomping-in-an-old-time-gospel-mood.html "Dance Stepping And Stomping In An Old Time Gospel Mood; June 2, 2002
"FIFTEEN boys and girls from the step dance team at Junior High School 231 in Springfield Gardens, Queens, were chatting in the back of the school auditorium. When Lamont O'Neil, the team's director, announced that he was ready to start rehearsal, they took off down the aisles, hurriedly tucking their white shirts into their pants and skirts. Forming a circle onstage, they bowed their heads and joined him in a prayer, as they always do before a rehearsal.

''How was your weekend?'' Mr. O'Neil asked.

A girl answered, laughing, ''Groovy.''

That was the last bit of levity for the next two and a half hours as Mr. O'Neil, a combination of drill sergeant, choreographer and big brother, put the team through its paces. To the hip-hop beat of the gospel singer Kirk Franklin's ''He Reigns,'' the youngsters, in three lines, ran through their routines in rapid-fire movements, slapping their hands on their hips, stomach and legs, crossing and recrossing their arms. Later the dancers chanted, ''We are the children of righteousness,'' imbuing their stepping with a spirituality.

Mr. O'Neil and his team were preparing for the competition that will take place today at the Hammerstein Ballroom in Manhattan as a part of this year's McDonald's Gospelfest. Begun by the fast-food chain in several black churches in Los Angeles in 1984, it now travels around the country, this year stopping in 11 cities. In addition to performances by Hezekiah Walker and the Love Fellowship Tabernacle Choir, Vickie Winans and Cissy Houston, it features competitions between choir groups, soloists and Christian rappers as well as those in step dancing and praise dancing, another form of black vernacular dance. In July, WABC (Channel 7) will broadcast a special with excerpts from the four events held in the New York area.

This brand of step dancing, or stepping as it is familiarly known, is not to be confused with Irish step dancing. Stepping dates to the early 20th century, when black veterans of World War I enrolled in colleges, said Thomas De Frantz, a professor of music and theater arts at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the historian of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater.

''They wanted to express their blackness through a communal art form of their own,'' he said. ''Inspired by their military training, they brought to their dances a highly rigorous, drill-like component and combined it with elements from other black dances, just as today steppers often add hip-hop movements.''

Stepping quickly took off in black fraternities and sororities, becoming an integral part of the initiation, with students holding fierce contests to demonstrate their originality. Spike Lee's 1988 film ''School Daze'' brought stepping to a wider audience.

Like much African-American music and dance, step dance relies on improvisation, call and response, complex meters, propulsive rhythms and a percussive attack. Since it resembles the gumboot dance of South African miners, some people theorize that it came to the United States directly from Africa, but Mr. De Frantz said the two forms simply share African movements.

Stepping can vary from the sexually suggestive to the reverential, and until recently step teams were segregated by sex.

PRAISE dancing began in Baptist churches in the late 19th century, a descendant of the ring shout, a religious dance of West African origin. Traditional praise dances are performed in a circle or as processions, sometimes accompanied by bugles and drums, with the performers carrying flags and banners. In contemporary praise dancing, participants, often in an ecstatic state inspired by their belief in God, determine their own movements. Ailey used elements of it in his masterpiece ''Revelations,'' as did Talley Beatty in his work ''Southern Landscape.''

Praise dance has recently developed a lively second life as a highly choreographed concert dance, and along with step dancing has become popular with community organizations as well as church and school groups. Curtis Farrow, a Gospelfest producer, said, ''There's been an explosion of interest among Hispanics, Asians and whites, who now make up 25 percent of the audience at the tri-state events.''

Like Mr. O'Neil's 231 Step Academy Team, Michael Gary's Acrodanse Theater Company, a modern dance troupe from Perth Amboy, N.J., that performs praise dance, was a champion at last year's McDonald's Gospelfest and will be returning this year to defend its title.

Before a recent performance at the Nicholas Musical Center at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., Mr. Gary, 41, talked about praise dancing, which he first saw as a child at his grandparents' church in Virginia. ''I use gestures and movements I recall from that time in my choreography,'' he said. ''There's never any set style or technique in praise dancing. It's about worshiping God in your own manner.''

To a recording of John T. Kee singing ''Praise Him,'' Mr. Gary and his 15 dancers, who range in age from 10 to 25, walked gracefully onto the stage. The female dancers wore brightly colored dresses, the male dancers white shirts, dark pants and vests. The subdued opening gave way in minutes to jubilation, as the dancers swirled about the stage, leaping and turning with their arms outstretched in gestures of worship.

''There are some elements of ballet and modern dance in the piece,'' Mr. Gary said later. ''But basically it's jump and shout, old-time, foot-stomping religion. There's nothing like it.''

Mr. O'Neil, 33, also sees a power in liturgical dance. He started stepping as a graduate student at Pennsylvania State University and gravitated to the secular variety that was popular on campus. Now he teaches a more religious form to his students.

When he started teaching at School 231 in 1993, he said, ''I saw the crises for the kids -- the temptations of the street and the lack of direction.'' A year later, he formed a stepping group, Nubian Gents, as a way to promote discipline and self-respect among the students. Today that group tours Africa, Asia and Europe. ''If these kids hadn't joined that team, a lot of them would be in gangs,'' he said.

A half hour into the rehearsal, Mr. O'Neil asked his young charges, ''Need a break?'' They sank to the floor in exhaustion. Gospelfest rules stipulate that routines can only last three minutes. It was going to take a lot more rehearsing to get theirs down to that.

''I don't mind the work,'' said one team member, Jeffrey Princivil. ''It helps keep all the negativity around me out of my life.''

A version of this article appears in print on June 2, 2002, Section 2, Page 24 of the National edition with the headline: DANCE; Stepping and Stomping in an Old-Time Gospel Mood"
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Click https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MM0xaSsDYUE&ab_channel=GMADoveAwards for a YouTube video of Kirk Franklin's "Reign" that is mentioned in this article.

Click https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bI0rb37Zb6Q&ab_channel=VIPMassChoir-Topic for a YouTube sound file of  John T. Kee's song "Let Us Praise Him".

This may be the John T. Kee's song that was mentioned in this New York Time's article as ''Praise Him".

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Kirk Franklin's 1997 Christian Hip Hop Song "Stomp" (with a video of praise dance, mime, line dancing, or modern dancing to this song)



olsKool Jamz, April 12, 2020

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Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases a 1997 YouTube video of "Stomp" performed by Kirk Franklin & God's Property, Chery; "Salt" James.

Four other YouTube videos of African Americans dancing to this Gospel Hip Hop song are also included in this pancocojams post.

The content of this post is presented for religious, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

 All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Kirk Franklin. "God's Property" and Cheryl "Salt" James for their musical legacy. Thanks also to all those who featured in videos that are embedded in this post and thanks to those videos' publishers on YouTube .
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Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/04/kirk-franklin-gods-property-featuring.html for the 2016 pancocojams post titled "Kirk Franklin & God's Property, featuring Salt - Stomp (Gospel video, information, lyrics, & comments)." Information about the artists and that song is included in that post along with information about some of the African American Vernacular English words that are found in Kirk Franklin's "Stomp".

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SHOWCASE VIDEO #2 [praise dancing]



Rufus Turner, Aug 8, 2010
Anointed Hands Ministry of Victory In Praise Church of Stockton Hip Hop dancers dance to Kirk Franklin's Stomp at the 2010 Summer Musical Blast

Song: Stomp

Artist: Kirk Franklin, God's Property

Album: Stellar Awards 30th Anniversary

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SHOWCASE VIDEO #3: Kirk Franklin "Stomp" [mime dancing]

Travis Mimms, Nov 1, 2011

Travis Mimms Mime Dancing at Lighthouse of Faith Community Church in Ft. Walton Beach, FL.

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SHOWCASE VIDEO #4: Gospel Line Dance - STOMP! [line dancing]



Roland Ford, Nov. 22, 2011

Roland Ford and members of the Pittsburgh Soul Steppers perform "STOMP!" at the Gospel Line Dance 'pre-party' before Kirk Franklin's Concert at Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall.  This dance choreographed by Roland was the kick-off for an hour long program of Gospel Line Dancing…


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SHOWCASE VIDEO #5: Kirk Franklin - Stomp (Dance Video) | quintonakeem. [modern dancing]



Q FLEX MOVES,  Feb. 20, 2018

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