Translate

Sunday, April 21, 2019

Four Video Examples Of Winnsboro Easter Rock ceremonies (A little known African American religious tradition)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part pancocojams series on "Easter Rock", an African American religious tradition that was -and to a much more limited extent-is still performed in Louisiana.

Part II showcases four YouTube videos of Winnsboro Easter Rock ceremonies, the only remaining Easter Rock ceremony.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/04/folkloric-article-excerpt-about-easter.html for Part I of this pancocojams series. Part I presents a long excerpt from a 2013 Louisiana Folklife Center article about research on Easter Rock ceremonies.

The content of this post is presented for religious, historical, folkloric, and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who participate in Easter Rock ceremonies. Thanks also to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

****
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
I had happened upon this article and some videos of Easter Rock last year and meant to feature them in this pancocojams blog on Easter. However, I had forgotten about that tradition until I (somehow) happened upon YouTube videos of Jamaican Revivalism "thanksgiving tables"*. The customs of dancing around a table lit with candles reminded me of something I had read-although my vague memory was that the way these Revivalism tables were set up, and the dancing itself isn't (always) the same or might have been completely different from what I thought I remembered reading about a Southern African American tradition. I didn't remember that the tradition was called "Easter Rock" until I read down through my Windows lists that I had written as background notes to possible pancocojams posts.

An information post and a post of videos on Jamaican Revivalism "thanksgiving tables"* will be published on pancocojams ASAP so interested people can read and see why I thought of Easter Rock when I came across those videos. The link for the second post in that series will be added to this post.

*I think that Jamaican Revivalism's "thanksgiving tables" aren't associated in any way to the annual Thanksgiving holiday that is celebrated in the United States and elsewhere.


****
INFORMATION ABOUT "EASTER ROCK"
"One of the most spectacular folk traditions documented for the Delta Folklife Project, Easter Rock, an Easter eve vigil ceremony, commemorates the death and resurrection of Christ.2 Easter Rock belongs to the category of traditional events called "rocks" associated with the old plantation churches (usually Baptist) in the Mississippi Delta floodplain of north Louisiana and has much in common with other African American religious ring shout traditions, according to Janet Sturman (1993: 24) and Joyce Jackson (2006).3 While the tradition is said to reach back to the antebellum period in Louisiana, today only one group appears to be continuing this Louisiana Delta tradition: the Winnsboro Easter Rock Ensemble, as the group named itself for performances of the tradition in state and national folklife festivals."...

****
SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Video #1: Winnsboro Easter Rock


dooney05, Published on Apr 8, 2012
This video was uploaded from an Android phone.


Video #2: Winnsboro Easter Rock Part 2



dooney05, Published on Apr 8, 2012

This video was uploaded from an Android phone.

****
Video #3: Easter Rock Ceremony 2013



LouisianaHumanities, Published on Mar 16, 2015

A video of an Easter Rock ceremony in Winnsboro, 2013.

****
Video #4: The Winnsboro Easter Rock Ensemble



Louisiana Folklife Center, Published on Oct 24, 2017 [57:24 minutes]

Winnsboro Easter Rock Ensemble narrative session and performance with Hattie Addison. The performance was introduced by folklorist Dr. Susan Roach, an expert on Delta Culture. Dr. Roach also led a post-performance discussion of the rare Easter eve vigil ritual tradition dating from the antebellum period and the Easter Rock tradition in Louisiana African American churches and a question answer session. This project was sponsored by a grant from the Lower Mississippi Delta Initiative of the National Park Service. Recorded Saturday July 15, 2017 at the Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival.
-snip-
The narrator in this video indicates that "Easter Rock" was an ante-bellum ritual, meaning that it occurred before the Civil War.


****
This concludes Part II of this two part pancocojams series on Easter Rock ceremonies.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome

Folkloric Article Excerpt About Easter Rock Ceremonies, A Little Known & Seldom Performed African American Religious Tradition In Louisiana (USA)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a two part pancocojams series on "Easter Rock", an African American religious tradition that was -and to a much more limited extent-is still performed in Louisiana.

Part I presents a long excerpt from a 2013 Louisiana Folklife Center article about research on Easter Rock ceremonies.

Part II showcases some videos of Winnsboro Easter Rock ceremonies, the only remaining Easter Rock ceremony.

The content of this post is presented for religious, historical, folkloric, and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who participate in Easter Rock ceremonies. Thanks also to the folklorist Susan Roach, the author of this quoted essay and thanks to the Louisiana Folklife Center.

****
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
I had happened upon this article and some videos of Easter Rock last year and meant to feature them in this pancocojams blog on Easter. However, I had forgotten about that tradition until I (somehow) happened upon YouTube videos of Jamaican Revivalism "thanksgiving tables"*. The customs of dancing around a table lit with candles reminded me of something I had read-although my vague memory was that the way these Revivalism tables were set up, and the dancing itself isn't (always) the same or might have been completely different from what I thought I remembered reading about a Southern African American tradition. I didn't remember that the tradition was called "Easter Rock" until I read down through my Windows lists that I had written as background notes to possible pancocojams posts.

An information post and a post of videos on Jamaican Revivalism "thanksgiving tables"* will be published on pancocojams ASAP so interested people can read and see why I thought of Easter Rock when I came across those videos. The link for the first post in that series will be added to this post.

*I think that Jamaican Revivalism's "thanksgiving tables" aren't associated in any way to the annual Thanksgiving holiday that is celebrated in the United States and elsewhere.

****
ARTICLE EXCERPT: "EVERYONE ROCKIN' TOGETHER": CONTINUITY AND CREATIVITY IN THE LOUISIANA DELTA EASTER ROCK
From http://www.louisianafolklife.org/LT/Articles_Essays/easterrock.html By Susan Roach
In Memory of Ellen Addison

"One of the most spectacular folk traditions documented for the Delta Folklife Project, Easter Rock, an Easter eve vigil ceremony, commemorates the death and resurrection of Christ.2 Easter Rock belongs to the category of traditional events called "rocks" associated with the old plantation churches (usually Baptist) in the Mississippi Delta floodplain of north Louisiana and has much in common with other African American religious ring shout traditions, according to Janet Sturman (1993: 24) and Joyce Jackson (2006).3 While the tradition is said to reach back to the antebellum period in Louisiana, today only one group appears to be continuing this Louisiana Delta tradition: the Winnsboro Easter Rock Ensemble, as the group named itself for performances of the tradition in state and national folklife festivals. Various factors including modernity, losses of group members and performance venues, and the effects of public presentation have threatened the continuity of the Winnsboro Easter Rock's performance of the tradition, but the group's creative responses have maintained the tradition and heightened its visibility in the Winnsboro community and beyond. A look at the Winnsboro Easter Rock service and public performances, including the context, the participants, and the sequence of acts and how these have developed over the past eighteen years, will shed light on the continuity and creativity in the tradition.

Easter Rock History and Scholarly Documentation
The contemporary Winnsboro Easter Rock is surprisingly similar to the early rocks described by scholars. Easter Rock's origins are not clear, and scholarship is scanty, with only three major scholarly articles devoted to the subject and one more article including it among several other Africanisms. The first scholarly publication by Mariana and Lea Seale in the Journal of American Folklore (1942) notes that participants remember the tradition as pre-dating the Civil War; therefore, the ritual probably has its origins in the customs of enslaved Africans.4 The Seales' observed three Easter Rock services: two at St. John the Baptist Church, at Dunbarton Plantation, near Clayton in Concordia Parish and another at the Baptist Church on Lemarque Plantation, next to Dunbarton. In the 1942 description, the rocks began with brief testimonial service (called a "cul'n" for covenant), which could be similar to the contemporary service's "devotional," followed by musical performances and an offering (Seale and Seale 1942: 212). Then the pews were turned to face the middle aisle, and a table with a white cloth was placed in the aisle. Interestingly, the Seales' description of the opening of the rock itself prefigures the Winnsboro rock held in the 21st century:
Precisely, at midnight by the deacon's watch, the deacon orders the congregation to "come quiet." Shortly thereafter, the voices of many women and a single man rise in the song, "When the Sancts [sic] Go Marchin' In," and a procession moves into the church through a door at the rear.
At the head of the procession is a Negro man carrying what is called "the banner." The banner is a barrel hoop attached to one end of a six-foot stick. The hoop has, stretched across its area in drumhead fashion, a covering of white crepe paper, and to its circumference is attached tasseled crepe of various bright colors. (1942: 213)

In many ways, the event as described by the Seales is similar to the Easter Rocks documented by subsequent scholars. In 1956, folklorist/musicologist Harry Oster recorded Easter Rock at one of the same churches. Evidently, Easter Rock occurred as far north as Lake Providence and south as Ferriday, according to anthropologist H .F. Gregory, who in 1962 recounted the typical rocks he witnessed growing up in Ferriday. He writes that the basic form of the rock was "exactly the same," from the "Primitive African Baptist Church near Waterproof . . . to the Pittsfield Plantation Church near Ferriday" (1962:18). However, instead of the 12 women bearing 12 lamps and 12 cakes noted by the Seales, these rocks featured 7 women carrying 7 lamps, and 7 cakes. While the Seales had found elders who recalled the symbolism of the objects, Gregory did not find explanations of the symbols (1962:18). From the 1960s until the 1990s, no documentation appears to have been done; however, at Gregory's suggestion, ethnomusicologist Janet Sturman located and documented the ceremony at the Springfield Baptist Church, also in Clayton in 1991.

According to organizer Martha Daniels' presentation for that 1991 Easter Rock, church records at the Springfield Baptist Church in Clayton, show that the church mothers of the St. Paul Baptist Church in Wisner held Easter Rock in 1930, when one of the Springfield Baptist Church deacons saw the ritual and decided to bring it to the Clayton church in 1932 (Sturman 1993: 26-27). Martha Daniels relates that Easter Rock was held sporadically there until the 1990s when the wood structure church was replaced with a brick one.
By 1993 when the Delta Folklife Field School was held to train community scholars for Delta fieldwork, my co-field school leader, H. F. "Pete" Gregory told participants that the ritual seemed to have disappeared. Nevertheless, we encouraged our Delta Folklife Project fieldworkers to inquire about Easter Rock. Shortly before Easter 1994, Annie Staten, a community scholar doing fieldwork on Delta gospel music, inquired about it and discovered that there was still another Easter Rock being held in Winnsboro, the parish seat of Franklin Parish about 50 miles from Clayton. She reported it to me, and we received permission to document the event. For that fieldwork, Staten and I were joined by her husband Prince Staten, who shot Super 8 video to add to our audio and photographic documentation.

We learned that the Winnsboro Easter Rock had a long tradition in Winnsboro, although it had not been documented previously. Led by Hattie Addison, this Easter Rock was held just outside Winnsboro at the Original True Light Baptist Church. According to Addison, this church had held Easter Rock since the late 1950s, and was one of several area churches which used to perform the ritual. The church building itself, believed to be over 100 years old, had been moved to its present site on Highway 4 near Winnsboro from the Robinson place. Her mother, Ellen Addison, had been a participant in Easter Rock since childhood in churches near Winnsboro—the Augusta Baptist Church on Mason Plantation and later Cuba Baptist Church; after people began to leave Mason Plantation, the rock moved to the Cuba church and later to the Original True Light Baptist Church, which was Hattie Addison's paternal grandfather's home church; Addison's mother joined it after she married (Addison 2011).

By 1993 when the Delta Folklife Field School was held to train community scholars for Delta fieldwork, my co-field school leader, H. F. "Pete" Gregory told participants that the ritual seemed to have disappeared. Nevertheless, we encouraged our Delta Folklife Project fieldworkers to inquire about Easter Rock. Shortly before Easter 1994, Annie Staten, a community scholar doing fieldwork on Delta gospel music, inquired about it and discovered that there was still another Easter Rock being held in Winnsboro, the parish seat of Franklin Parish about 50 miles from Clayton. She reported it to me, and we received permission to document the event. For that fieldwork, Staten and I were joined by her husband Prince Staten, who shot Super 8 video to add to our audio and photographic documentation.

We learned that the Winnsboro Easter Rock had a long tradition in Winnsboro, although it had not been documented previously. Led by Hattie Addison, this Easter Rock was held just outside Winnsboro at the Original True Light Baptist Church. According to Addison, this church had held Easter Rock since the late 1950s, and was one of several area churches which used to perform the ritual. The church building itself, believed to be over 100 years old, had been moved to its present site on Highway 4 near Winnsboro from the Robinson place. Her mother, Ellen Addison, had been a participant in Easter Rock since childhood in churches near Winnsboro—the Augusta Baptist Church on Mason Plantation and later Cuba Baptist Church; after people began to leave Mason Plantation, the rock moved to the Cuba church and later to the Original True Light Baptist Church, which was Hattie Addison's paternal grandfather's home church; Addison's mother joined it after she married (Addison 2011).

Addison, born in 1953, began attending the rock as a child around age six. She recalls her earliest memories of the rock; her daddy's second cousin "used to pick us up and carry us out there, and we used to stand . . . on top of the car and look in the windows because they had the windows up. You didn't have the air conditioners and all that. And he would pull close to the church by the windows so we could stand up there and watch; that was before I started rocking" (2011).

The Ritual and Its Symbols: Continuity and Variation
The Winnsboro Easter Rock shows much continuity with the Clayton ritual documented in 1992 by Sturman, even though the two groups were not aware of each other. Comparison reveals some regional variation within the tradition. In addition, over the years even within the Winnsboro Easter Rock, creative changes have occurred in the ritual in regard to the banner, the table decor, the apparel of the rockers and the performers, and even the venue. Some of those changes may be due to our Delta Folklife Project documentation and its results.

Time Frame and Set Up
One major change that has occurred in the Winnsboro rock is that their Easter Rock service no longer lasts until Easter morning sunrise. Long time participant in the Winnsboro Easter Rock, Lillie Carter recalls how the time has changed since she began participating at age eight: "We'd start about nine o'clock, and we end at 12 now, but they used to rock all night long; the older people used to rock all night 'til the sunrise the next morning"(Easter Rock Presentation 2001). That is, the service would last until the morning; the rock itself would be interspersed with breaks for more music and food. Hattie Addison attributes the shorter services today to the fact that people want to go to Easter sunrise service, refreshed from sleep. The Winnsboro group began to cut the rock short; now they usually begin around 7 or 8 and stop well before midnight, usually around 10 p.m., which is the approximate time frame of the rock in our initial documentation in 1994. In the past, Addison's family told her that they rocked until the "sun shouts," that is, sunrise. Addison relates how she thought her parents were teasing her about the sun shouting, so she decided to see it for herself, only to discover that the sun would "be rocking, you know; it'd be like it's jumping, and I don't know what made them go out to see that back then, but if you go out there Easter Sunday morning you can see it. . . . But I don't know why it was jumping like, but you could see it was just jumping" (2011). When the rock lasted all night, people brought all types of food, as described by Lillie Carter; "at that time the older people would cook like a whole dinner that night, and they would serve ham, chicken, dressing, and that kind of stuff" (Easter Rock Presentation 2003). When the rock ended by 10 or 12 p.m., the need for heartier food diminished, so food was limited to cakes and punch. Obviously, the Easter Rock tradition is steeped in many beliefs and practices, some of which have survived and others which have disappeared or evolved.

The basic dรฉcor for the event has changed little over the years. On the day of the Easter Rock ceremony, the venue for the rock is set up sometime before the actual rock service begins or just before the opening devotional service. Hattie Addison reports that she and her helpers usually set this up in the afternoon, hours before the service. The usual forward-facing pews, which normally face the altar and pulpit, are turned sideways to face the center aisle. A long table, covered with a white cloth, is set in the aisle so that the pews are facing it. Addison concurs with Martha Daniels from Clayton that the white cloth-covered table represents the sepulcher of Christ. This preliminary decoration includes putting crepe paper streamers and Easter eggs and candy on the table. According to Addison, the set up takes time and "a lot of hard work . . . trying to get everything situated, finding decoration and all that. I usually do that myself, but when it come down to cakes and the punch, different ones donate [those]" (2011).

Surprisingly, the order of the Easter Rock service shows little change over time and place. The activities of the service may be outlined by a paper program which is distributed to the congregation, but even without the paper programs, the event follows the traditional pattern. The programs for the 2011 and 2012 Winnsboro Easter Rock show that this group continues to follow the traditional sequence of activities in the ceremony.
Descriptions of the earlier Easter Rocks by the Seales, Oster, Sturman, and Addison were much the same. Typically, before the actual rock begins, the service opens with a congregational song, followed by a devotional, consisting of a hymn, biblical scripture reading, and prayer. As it is in other traditional rural South African American Baptist services, the devotional is led by an elderly deacon, who calls out the hymn, reads the scripture, and delivers a traditional prayer accented with supportive words from the congregation.
In addition, a short sermon by the home (or a visiting) minister followed; in the case of the 1994 Easter Rock, the church minister Reverend J. L. McDowell delivered the sermon; however, in 2011 and 2012 the sermon was omitted. The Easter Rock described in previous accounts as well as today's Winnsboro Easter Rock have all presented an hour or more of musical performances by various singers and musicians (either visiting or local). The 2011 and 2012 Easter Rock programs each listed four solos before the actual rock began; however, other unlisted soloists also performed. The 1994 and 1995 Easter Rocks featured even more music, including some bands with instruments. An offering (or two) is held, and may occur after the first performance of the rock or even before it. Then the actual rock begins.

The Rock Procession
To open the rock, the table is further set with other symbolic objects and provides the opening frame for the major event. Twelve women march in carrying oil lamps, which are placed on the table and lighted, or they may be lighted before they are brought to the table. While the use of lamps and cakes does not vary, in some performances, the number 12 does. This was apparent in our first observation of the rock, where only two lamps were on the table. Evidently, some were broken and could not be used. However, in later Winnsboro performances, twelve lamps were used, as Hattie and Ellen Addison say to "represent the 12 tribes of Israel" (Addison 1994). Occasionally as in 1995, the lamps are placed and lighted before the procession starts.

Gregory reports the use of seven lamps and seven cakes with additional food (1962: 18). Others interviewed have said the lamps are from Christ's parable of the ten virgins (five wise and five foolish) waiting for the bridegroom. In earlier days, according to Gregory (1962:18), all sorts of dishes of food were brought for the table, but today in Winnsboro, dรฉcor consists of Easter eggs and white cakes. The women then bring in twelve cakes and red punch (often Kool-Aid); in the past wine was often used instead of punch. Hattie Addison remembers the wine served in her childhood: "They served wine, but it was in an itty bitty . . . cup" (2001). In earlier years Addison reports that "Morgan Davis," a colloquial name for Mogen David wine, was used instead of punch. The cake and wine might well symbolize the body and blood of Christ as they do in communion. Addison also notes her elders telling her "that eggs was used for the breaking of the grave" (Addison 2011).

The cakes today are mainly commercial ring cakes with Easter decorations, but occasionally someone will bake a homemade cake with white icing–highly valued now. Asked about the origin of the 12 cakes, Hattie Addison responds: "I don't know why they used cakes. I asked mother the same thing, she said she didn't know, she just going by other folks did, her grandmother, her mama. . . . I know they said that, it might have been the bread, I know they said that the punch represented the blood" (Addison 2011). She further explains the meaning of the cakes: "The 12 cakes are for the 12 disciples, Jesus broke bread with them and gave us the bread of life" (Addison 1997). Addison notes that in her family's rocks, the cakes did not have to be all white, but light colored (although chocolate cakes were never put on the table but might be left in back with other types of food). The cakes and punch will be served after the rock service ends.

When the rock begins, the church lights are dimmed, and a procession, which Hattie Addison terms "the rockers," enter. According to Katie King, Winnsboro elder who had participated in the rock, the women represent the resurrection of Christ: "They's the ones that went to that grave, the ones that found out Christ had risen, and that's what they was representing in that white" (1994). Addison reiterates this idea: "the women were so concerned about Christ that they went to see about Christ. So this is our ritual part where the women would rock and praise the lord for their risen savior" (1997). In the 1994 and 1995 rocks, just as in earlier rocks held in plantation churches, the rockers entered through the double doors leading into the sanctuary. Traditionally, Addison says that the rockers were twelve women, just as the Seales described, but today an occasional man may be included, and the number of rockers may vary, depending on how many are available. The Winnsboro Easter Rock in 1994 was led by Reverend Lionel Wilson, dressed in a white shirt and black tie with black slacks.

He continued to participate in the rock until he moved to the Atlanta area. In earlier rocks, women wore white Sunday dresses or suits and white dress shoes. For the 2011 and 2012 Easter Rock in Winnsboro, led by a woman, the rockers, reflecting today's less formal attire now worn in worship services, wore either more casual skirts and white tops and white tennis or other athletic shoes.

As the Winnsboro Rockers enter the church, they sing a processional song such as the Winnsboro group's "When the Saints Go Marching In," just as in the rock documented by the Seales. In contrast, the 1991 Clayton group sang instead "Keep Your Lamps Trimmed and Burning." While the vocal performances in the preliminary service before the rock may have accompanying instruments (guitar, piano, organ, etc.), the rock has a cappella singing done in traditional call and response style. A song leader typically stands to one side and begins the song, and the Rockers respond.

The Winnsboro group has the following repertoire of songs: "When the Saints Go Marching In," "Oh, David," and "The Lord's Prayer." Hattie Addison explains the use of the song "Oh, David": "David was a warrior, a good warrior, and we know Jesus was a warrior when he came on the cross and died for us. Also Jesus came out of the house of David and so we are using David the song as a heroic song" (1997). This differs somewhat from the Clayton group, which has some other old spirituals. The callers in the Winnsboro Easter Rock have varied over the years, according to availability. The much admired caller in the 1994 service stood below the pulpit and off to the side. For the 2011 and 2012 services, women have carried on the tradition.

The Banner
The procession's leader carries the four-to-five foot tall "banner," the major symbolic object of the ritual. The banner is a long pole topped with a flat round disk, covered with fabric, paper, or foil. According to Addison, the earlier Winnsboro banners were white with strings torn from sheets instead of crepe paper. Winnsboro's banner is now decorated with crepe paper streamers and two black cord pulls that are used to move the banner from side to side, while the smaller Clayton banner was covered with white cloth and had multi-colored braided cord pulls, but no streamers.

The banner base obviously changed because certain objects became less available over time. For example, up to the 1930s, barrels used for storage of various products such as flour, pickles, etc. were commonly found on the farm or in stores. Thus barrel hoops were easy to find. However, when packaging changed, other creative means had to provide the hoop for the banner. Most farms had muscadines, which had vines that could be fashioned into a hoop. The hula hoop fad of the late 1950s provided another convenient alternative for the banner base of today's rockers.

Regarding the banner's origin and symbolic meaning, Addison explains that the banner is said by some to symbolize Christ's cross or Moses' staff. Reverend Lionel Wilson explains the meaning: "That person is carrying the banner as Jesus carried the cross. The banner is in a circular form and the reason for that is there is no ending to a circle, and it represents Jesus' life because there is no ending to Jesus, for we know that he lives now and forever more" (Easter Rock Presentation 1997).

In her study of the Easter Rock at Clayton, Sturman suggests that the banner may be a re-creation of the kinds of banners found often in African processions, especially in funeral processions, or perhaps a silent symbol of the forbidden drum (1993: 30). Suggesting the hybrid nature of Easter Rock, Joyce Jackson correlates the circular banner and the counterclockwise circular movement around the table with the Congo sign of the four moments of the sun, which is the "emblem of spiritual continuity and renaissance" (death and resurrection) (Jackson 2006:11)

To help the banner move from side to side, a "banner puller" follows the banner carrier. Only certain members of the group can serve as banner puller since it takes strength and coordination to help control the large moving object. Addison explains the significance of the banner puller: "This is because Jesus had a helper when he was carrying the cross" ("Easter Rock," 1997).

The Rock Movement
The term "rock" itself—the name for both the ritual and the movement in the ritual—has also been given various explanations. When asked about the meaning of the term rock, interviewees gave us different views. For example, Hattie's mother, Ellen Addison, cited a biblical source for the rock: "Elijah rocked to the coming of the Lord." R.B. Kelly sees the rock as representing the rolling away of the rock from Christ's Tomb. Most likely, the rock reflects the side-to-side movement, not only of the rockers, but of the banner itself. The singing group begins to "rock," circling counter-clockwise rhythmically around the table in a shuffle step from side to side. Ellen Addison describes how the rock step is done: "Just get out there and move your foot from one side to another, but you ain't supposed to cross your legs. . . . They say you're dancing when you cross your legs. But you don't do that" (1994). The Winnsboro group is quick to caution that the Rock is not a dance, although some scholars and newspapers have termed it so. Hattie Addison explains the rock movement: "It's just a little hop from one side to the other, but you got to get the step, you know, you got to stay in the move with it." Echoing her mother, Hattie stresses the importance of the children learning the appropriate way to rock: "Like, these children don't know, and . . . they love to dance, and I just let them know that they aren't dancing, that they going to have to get it the way we was brought up to do it, or they don't Rock" (1994).

For Addison, as she participates in the rock, the rock is an important religious experience: "To me, it's spiritual, you know, I love it, and it's spiritual . . . to me; it's meaningful; it's real religious, it's spiritual" (1994). This is what she seeks to share with the children she teaches when they practice the weeks before the Easter service.

While the structure of Easter Rock seems to have changed little over the years, the tempo and fervor of the steps of the rock movement in the Clayton and Winnsboro groups differ. The Winnsboro Easter Rock processional is much faster and louder than the Clayton group, as can be seen in a comparison of the videos from the Winnsboro and Clayton groups.

When I shared the 1991 video of the Clayton Easter Rock with Hattie and Ellen Addison, and asked if the earlier rocks from their childhoods had looked like this, Hattie Addison's response indicates a major regional difference between the two groups: "When I started [rocking], we rocked the way we are rocking now." When her mother, Ellen Addison saw the video, she responded, "Oh no, I don't know what kind of rock that is." According to Addison, her mother and an older cousin said, "Oh no, we never did do it like that" (2011). Addison is referring to the difference in the speed and fervor of the rockers, which results in a heavier beat on the wooden floor, which is regarded as essential for the Easter Rock. Hattie explains the importance of the heavy beat on the wooden floor: "Yeah, you could hear the sound, that's what we were used to listening to, the sound, you know, with the rocking. . . . It just sounds like a drum beating to me. . . . It gives you more, I don't know, it's just more sound to it, to me, I just love it, it just sounds good to me, than just you know a regular brick [concrete] floor" (2011).

Participants and Audience
The participants who start the rock procession are the ones who have grown up in the tradition and gone through the training, often as children. Learning in the folk process, Ellen Addison describes how she learned to rock when she was a child: "They just, just all of us got together. They put all the children in the middle and the old folks got behind. It [would] be about five in the front, and the rest of them would be behind. . . . [I] just got there and see what they were doing; I see what my grandma was doing, my auntie was doing, and I just did what she was doing" (1994). Thus the procession and the initial phases of the rock are performed by the participants who have been trained as specialists in the tradition. The group practices before the event and has to be in good enough physical shape to last through the whole service. Addison's Winnsboro group always opens the ritual with the twelve women rockers, previously joined by Reverend Lionel Wilson as the banner carrier. Generally, the rockers will continue to sing and rock around the table for thirty minutes or so and then march out and take a break, during which more music may be performed.

Then the rockers come back for one or more sessions rocking around the table. Usually, during the second round of rocking, audience members come forth to join in the twelve original rockers in the rock. Since the Easter Rock service is a public church service, the audience may include both members and non-members of the church where the rock is held. Some may be familiar with the rock while others are not. According to accounts from all the rocks, as the rock progresses, audience members, even visiting whites, participate. One interviewee, R.B. Kelly, notes that as it got later in the evening, the whites would join in, and that was one of the "prettiest sights" he had ever seen—"everyone rocking together" (1994).

[...]

Before Lionel Wilson moved to Georgia, he often served as the spokesperson on narrative stages. His presentations sometimes included information that was undoubtedly learned from the presenters.

[...]

His discussion of the origin and meaning of the circle and the banner echoes Joyce Jackson's 1997 narrative stage introduction:

A circular ritual in the church, . . . [Easter Rock] is a carry over from the African Diaspora, and you can see that they are using a round banner which symbolized a cross. Well, that is not so foreign either, although you don't see round crosses normally in Baptist Churches, but if you look at the literature and you look at traditional African religions and those in the Caribbean, you find that the circle is very important, not only in the way that they move around the church and around the table but also in the worship and in the life cycle. If you look at life, it's like a circle and this circle was very instrumental in the way that they worshipped and looked at life, or the worldview. When you are born it's like you are at the 12 o'clock position and as you go through life you move around that circle, or the circle of life. And so the circle is very important in African traditions and so again it's sort of a carry over in this rocking tradition.
Wilson's eloquent remarks in this 2003 presentation are similar to his earlier 2001 presentation (below) which also discusses the symbolism of the Rock; a comparison of these illustrates the formulaic nature of his presentations:
The Easter Rock is a tradition that we perform in Winnsboro, Louisiana at the original True Life Baptist Church located on Highway 4 in Winnsboro. It is done the Saturday before Easter. It is a circular dance that we do in the black church; it's a rhythmic rock from side-to-side as the caller is singing a song talking about "Oh David." The song "Oh David" is a victory song, it tells the story of David and Goliath, when David went out on the battle field and slew the mighty giant Goliath. He was victorious in that battle and that is why we use the song "Oh David" because Jesus we know he was victorious over the grave for he died and he rose again. Here this afternoon, well this evening, what you will see will be a table that is dressed in white and on the table you will notice that there will be 12 cakes placed on the table which represents the 12 disciples. And you will notice that there will be 12 lanterns which represent the 12 tribes of Israel, you will also notice that there will be some punch placed on the table, some red punch, which symbolized the blood of Jesus. Before the punch was introduced into the scene they had real wine that they would drink after the Easter Rock but now we use regular punch of the color red to symbolize the blood of Jesus. Also on the table you will see the basket which represents the grave, the eggs which represents the breaking of the grave when Jesus rose on the third day morning. You will also notice we are dressed in white which symbolizes purity. You will notice that there will be a banner carried by the first person that is leading the rock. That person is carrying the banner as Jesus carried the cross. The banner is in a circular diagonal form and the reason for is there is no ending to a circle and it represents Jesus' life because there is no ending to Jesus for we know that he lives now and forever more. (2001)

[...]

Notes
1. This essay is dedicated to the memory of Ellen Addison, the matriarch of the Winnsboro Easter Rock, who passed away in April 2011 and to Hattie Addison for her efforts to keep the Easter Rock alive and share it with others. She welcomed our documentary efforts numerous times and helped us with our research. I am also grateful to Delta Folklife Project community scholar, Annie Staten, who located the Winnsboro group and facilitated our initial research efforts with this group. I would like to acknowledge other members of the Winnsboro Easter Rock Ensemble over the years: Jimmie Lamb, Jimmie Lee Jones, Laketa Addison Levy, Jessie White, Ashley Winn, Ella Washington, Britney Cook, Christy Cook, Azzie Lee Jackson, Booker T. Burkhalter, Lionel Wilson, Lillie Carter, and callers Jimmy Brown and Fred Ross.

[...]

Susan Roach is a folklorist at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston. She wrote this article for Delta Pieces: Northeast Louisiana Folklife in 2013."

****
This concludes Part I of this two part pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Saturday, April 20, 2019

Definition Of The Jamaican Patois Phrase "Big Up" & Examples Of That Phrase From The Discussion Thread For Koffee's "Toast" Official YouTube Video

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part III of a three part pancocojams series about the Reggae song "Toast" by Koffee and documents selected comments from the discussion thread of that song's official YouTube video.

Part III presents definitions for the Jamaican phrase "big up" and documents examples with the term "Big up" from the discussion official video of Koffee's Reggae song "Toast".

The Addendum to this post documents a few other comments from this same discussion thread that include Jamaican terms or phrases. Selected responses from that discussion thread to those comments are also included in this post.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/04/koffee-toast-jamaican-reggae-video.html for Part I of this series. Part I presents information about Jamaican Reggae singer Koffee (Mikayla Simpson).

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/04/a-roll-call-of-nations-from-discussion.html for Part II of this pancocojams series. Part II presents an overview of what I refer to as "nation signing" in comments, and documents a roll-call like list of those comments from the discussion thread for the official video of Koffee's 2018 Reggae song "Toast".

That post also showcases a YouTube video of Koffee's 2018 video entitled "Toast". The lyrics for that song are also included in that post.

****
The content of this post is presented for cultural and linguistics purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Koffee for her music. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.
-snip-
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/09/examples-of-term-big-up-in-youtube.html for a closely related 2016 pancocojams post entitled "Examples Of The Term "Big Up" In YouTube Discussion Threads For African Music Videos"

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: Koffee - Toast (Official Video)



Original Koffee, Published on Nov 16, 2018

****
DEFINITIONS OF THE PHRASE "BIG UP"
These excerpts aren't given in any order of preference.

Excerpt #1:
From http://jamaicanpatwah.com/b/top-15-jamaican-patois-words-you-should-know#.V9MRmpgrLcs
Top 15 Jamaican Patois words you should know, Posted on July 28, 2014
"Big up
English Translation: Give respect / Give props

Definition: To give respect, encouragement or to acknowledge someone

Example Sentences
(Patois) Mi hav fi big up John fi everything him duh fi wi
(English) I have to give John respect for everything that he did for us"

****
Excerpt #2:
From http://jamaicanpatwah.com/term/Big-up/912#.XLreIehKi70
English Translation: Thumbs up/ Props
posted by nharnhar.adu.jephson.7069 on December 8, 2018

Definition: To give thumbs up, respect or admiration

Example Sentences
Patois: Big up mi chargie fi yuh outstanding performance
English: Thumbs up my friend for your outstanding performance

****
SELECTED COMMENTS THAT INCLUDE THE PHRASE "BIG UP" FROM THIS VIDEO'S DISCUSSION THREAD
This compilation presents selected comments from the official video for the song "Toast" by Koffee that include the Jamaican Patois phrase "Big Up". These examples document the fact that this phrase is by non-Jamaicans in numerous nations throughout the world.

Some of these examples are replies to another comment. In that case, that comment is also included in this compilation. Some of these comments prompted a number of replies. Comments #18 to #32 are examples of this type of exchanges in that discussion thread.

Most of these examples are "nation signing in" comments. Part II of this pancocojams series includes a brief overview of those types of YouTube discussion thread comments.

Numbers are added to the comments in this compilation for referencing purposes only.

Disclaimer: I didn't read all of the comments in that discussion thread, but I did read A LOT of them. I believe that these selected comments are representative of the comments in that entire discussion thread.

1. cameron stewart, 2018
"Big up your self kenyan man nuff respect ๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ช"

**
2. iam_marwa, 2018
"Kenyan Watching from Dominican Rep. Bigup Koffee"

**
3. David Blaze, 2018
"You are going to be big, star on the rise. You need to make something with Chronixx! Big up from Germany"

**
4. Roberto Jacques, 2019
"Im Haitian ๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡น I cant stop listening to this beautiful song ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ❤️❤️❤️"

**
REPLY
5. Om Devine, 2019
"Big up urself brother. Nuff luv from ๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฒ"

**
6. Dan Egorov, 2019
"One of the best young reggae artists now. Huge talent. Big up from Russia"

**
7. Marina Dawson,2019
"big tune. KOFFEE Belizeans love yo music"

**
8. Me Moi, 2019
"Koffee the anointed one, shaking up our soul with vibrations and mad tune! Jah Bless ❤️๐Ÿ’—❤️ Big up Sis!!!"

**
9. Sarah Price, 2019
"Big up Koffee from Belfast, Northern Ireland. As a musician its nice hearing such conscious music coming from someone so young. Listening to your music think you have created a new Genre."

**
10. steveson sabore, 2019
"Heard this in kisumu kenya and it flows..bigUp koffee"

**
11. videolavida, 2019
"This ones starting to catch fire in California. Big up."

**
12. GirlisGaming, 2019
"Anyyy big up Trini"

**
13. stuzzielahd2208, 2019
"Big up from Scotland!"

**
14. Gachoka.J, 2019
"Big up from Kenya. Original and talent ๐Ÿ‘"

**
15. Judea Hall, 2019
"Big up,respect man but this song Is fire,"

**
16. Boulie44tatoo, 2019
"Big up from Paris ! Top Koffee !"

**
17. Florence Lewis, 2019
"Koffee big up uself Jamaica wi seh ๐Ÿค˜๐Ÿค˜๐Ÿค˜๐ŸŽต๐ŸŽต๐ŸŽต๐ŸŽต๐ŸŽผ๐ŸŽผ๐ŸŽผ๐ŸŽถ๐ŸŽถ๐ŸŽถ๐ŸŽง๐ŸŽง๐ŸŽง๐ŸŽง๐ŸŽง๐ŸŽง๐ŸŽง๐ŸŽง"

**
18. Rory Hale, 2019
"Heard this on the radio in Toronto today the flow. Big up koffee"

**
REPLY
19. TZT, 2019
"Won't be long til yall steal it"

**
REPLY
20. Gabriella Brown, 2019
"ur not Jamaican! LMFAOOOOOO"

**
REPLY
21. Rory Hale, 2019
"Gabriella Brown so what?"

**
REPLY
22. Sarallina .S, 2019
"@Rory Hale yh so what?"

**
REPLY
23. Gabriella Brown, 2019
"@Rory Hale u don't even have an accent. UR using patwah slang it's cringey . Unlike u I'm Jamaican"

**
REPLY
24. Sarallina .S, 2019
"@Gabriella Brown ur being really ignorant
Since Jamaican music is so beautiful people from all different cultures and people with all different accents can appreciate Caribbean music.Thats a fact."

**
REPLY
25. kangol 0ne, 2019
"@Sarallina .S I think she is a child, don't pay her any mind she will outgrow it one day lol. We need to understand that people of all ages have access to the comment section"

**
REPLY
26. Rory Hale, 2019
"Gabriella Brown lol all I said was big up! I grew up around Jamaicans and have always had jamaican friend in my life that I would consider family. I have loved reggae music since I was a child and have never had any Jamaican tell me I am not welcome in the reggae/dancehall scene because of my skin colour. Also how did you know I’m not Jamaican? I’ve seen many white Jamaicans before. If you are a fan of koffee or chronixx or protoje I think your getting their message mixed because all about ❤️."

**
REPLY
27. meli xx, 2019
"@TZT steal what, the song? Makes no sense.. We talking cultural appropriation as usual. We are all free the enjoy eachothers art regardless of race or religion. One love ♥"

**
REPLY
28. TZT, 2019
"@meli xx na fam they are culture vultures"

**
REPLY
29. Rory Hale, 2019
"Gabriella Brown also.... all Toronto mans say “big up”, Toronto has a massive Jamaican culture you know. You can’t grow up here without speaking a likkle patois my yout."

**
REPLY
30. Ebony Blackstar, 2019
"@Gabriella Brown You are a very ignorant Jamaican. I wish you would stop telling people you are Jamaican. Instead please say, "I represent an ignorant and stupid class of Jamaicans." You are very myopic in your thinking. You need exposure and an education and please stay off social media. @Rory please continue to enjoy Jamaican music and culture."

**
REPLY
31. N Lee, 2019
"@Gabriella Brown girl I am from "Galtigo Bay" in case there are any boubts. So my question is and what is your point?

He likes what he likes. I live in Toronto now and trust me our culture is very celebrated here. This song has been on heavy rotation on lots of stations especially G98"

**
REPLY
32. canadianbeylover, 2019
"TZT you do know that Toronto has one of the biggest Caribbean, ESPECIALLY JAMAICAN diasporas in the world right? We all grow up together in this city sharing culture. ๐Ÿค” Are you ignorant or just stupid?"

****
ADDENDUM
1. Mohammed 'Guru Voke' Mwiti, 2018
"Wow.. Big tchune.. Nuff love n respect from Kenya ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ™
-snip-
"tchune" = (given in Jamaica as "tune", "chune", and/or "choon"), meaning the complete song

**
REPLY
2. Mickie Browne, 2018
"Yow take the "T" out "tchune", disrespectful!!"

**
REPLY
3. Mohammed 'Guru Voke' Mwiti, 2018
"@Mickie Browne where i come from it doesn't mean anything negative, its all about where you come from like in Kenya if your song is good we say that tchune is the baddest.. Hope you get my point"

**
4. onismo mudavanhu, 2018
"The problem with dis tune is it ends. Good Vybez there, Zimbabwe approves."

**
5. Melanie Thompson, 2019
"Tuff tune can't wait to go home to Jamaica and be jammin to dis tune. I listen to this song in Florida am in Guyana now and still jammin to Koffee... nuff blessings"

**
6. lavian machimbirike, 2019
"Mad Tune ! jamming to this in Zimbabwe"

**
7. Fitzroy Miller, 2019
"Blessed up yourselves babes"

**
8. Kile Williams, 2019
"Bigger chune ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ’ž๐Ÿ’“frm ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฆ toronto yuh zee it"

**
9. Rita Okorodudu, 2019
"I love this music so much koffee bless up sis✌️from nigeria"

**
10. Bria Kenzie, 2019
"Jones Christopher bless up ♥️๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฒ"

**
11. InCored- Standoff, 2019
"The woman doing her hair must have been vex because of so much movement ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚"

**
REPLY
12. Regina Wiltshire, 2019
"InCored- Standoff I was saying the same thing ๐Ÿคฃ"

**
REPLY
13. Kahdijah Holder, 2019
"So this song is EVERYTHING ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜ and I love the video ❤️❤️ but the one thing that amazes me is how I been buss in the head top with the comb for doing way less movement than that when getting my hair done.... ๐Ÿ‘€ She really IS Blessed..!"

**
14. Fitzroy Miller,2019
"Blessed up"

**
15. john maina, 2019
"Big Tune.... loving it from outta ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ช... wakenya gongeni like๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜Ž..."

**
16. Marina Dawson, 2019
"big tune. KOFFEE Belizeans love yo music"


**
17. Swaggie TV, 2019
"Big Chune!! DJ KHALED VOICE"

****
This concludes Part III of this three part pancocojams post.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Friday, April 19, 2019

A Roll Call Of Nations From The Discussion Thread For The Official YouTube Video Of Koffee's 2018 Reggae Song "Toast"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a three part pancocojams series about the Reggae song "Toast" by Koffee and documents selected comments from the discussion thread of that song's official YouTube video.

Part II includes an overview of what I refer to as "nation signing" in comments, and documents a roll-call like list of those comments from the discussion thread for the official video of Koffee's song "Toast".

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/04/koffee-toast-jamaican-reggae-video.html for Part I of this series. Part I presents information about Jamaican Reggae singer Koffee (Mikayla Simpson).

That post also showcases a YouTube video of Koffee's 2018 video entitled "Toast". The lyrics for that song are also included in that post.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/04/definition-of-jamaican-patois-phrase.html for Part III of this series. Part III presents definitions for the Jamaican phrase "big up" and documents examples with the term "Big up" from the discussion official video of Koffee's Reggae song "Toast".

The Addendum to that post documents a few other comments from this same discussion thread that include Jamaican terms or phrases. Selected responses from that discussion thread to those comments are also included in this post.

****
The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Koffee for her music. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: Koffee - Toast (Official Video)



Original Koffee, Published on Nov 16, 2018

****
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S COMMENTS ABOUT "NATION SIGNING IN" COMMENTS
It wasn't until April 2019 that I really became aware of the YouTube discussion thread commenting custom that I refer to as "nation signing in".

"Nation signing in" (nsi) occurs when a person writes his or her nation's name, country code top-level domain [initials], country [telephone] code (iso) etc. in a discussion thread for a YouTube music video with or without any other text or emojis (small digital images or icons).

"Nation signing in" comments serve as "shout outs" (brief public acknowledgements/greetings and/or praises) for a particular song and/or singer/s. These comments document the global reach of a particular song, singer/s, and particular musical genre/s by serving as a "roll-call" of the nations (and sometimes also from ethnic groups, language groups, cities/states etc.) that know this song/singer and are enthusiastic about this song/singer.

In addition to documenting how widespread specific musical genres are known and loved, some of these comments document how people common it is for people from one nation, region, or continent to live outside the nation, region, or continent where they were born.

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS VIDEO'S DISCUSSION THREAD
This compilation of selected comments from the discussion thread for Jamaican Reggae singer Koffee's official video for her song "Toast" is divided into three separate pancocojams post.

These examples aren't all of the roll-call comment that are found in that discussion thread as of the date and time of the publication of this post.

Some nations that aren't represented in one portion of this compilation are represented in other portions. Also, more than one comment from a specific nation may be found in each portion of this compilation.

Separate numbers are added to each portion of this compilation for referencing purposes only.

Disclaimer: I didn't read all of the comments in that discussion thread, but I did read A LOT of them. I believe that these selected comments are representative of those types of comments in that entire discussion thread.

Here's a comment that doesn't include a nation's name (or any city name), but is representative of this particular portion of this compilation:
Jacob Parker, 2019
"I’ve seen people from all over the world in these comments. Amazing the power of music is"


1. Yahoo Falla, 2018
"My greetings to all the African people from the land of Sudan"

**
2. Wallace Schultz, 2019
"Maori watching from Malaysia"

**
3. Jamal Ilmi, 2019
"Kenya is represented as well
This is a big tune
We are thankful"

**
4. abass Kalala Tom, 2019
"This's the thune I welcomed the year ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ญ๐ŸŒน๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ญ❤️❤️❤️๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‘Š๐Ÿฟ"
-snip-
The initials and emoji stand for "Ghana really loves Jamaica".

**
5. Issam Omar, 2019
"Im in Germany dancing my heart off to this Song ❤️❤️❤️❤️ brought so many joyful moments in my life THANK YOU SO MUCH"

**
6. KATO SHABOLA. 2019
"who came here after searching Kenyans favorite song from Jamaica 2018"

**
7. nicola Louise, 2019
This song is on repeat ๐Ÿคฉ๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ’ƒ๐Ÿ’ƒ in Scotland"

**
8. Antonio Rodriguez, 2019
"Koffee Beautiful Jacksonville,Fl We Listening"

**
9. jade walker, 2019
"Ever day i listen this song i am a rasta to i live in newyork❤❤"

**
10. ozan atl, 2019
"i‘m living in austria and this song is already spreading here"

**
11. Monex Kexx, 2019
"Keny๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ชa, Uganda ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ฌ, Somalia๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ด and S Sudan ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ธ.
We're here"

**
12. rassoul nabi, 2019
"Dakar Sรฉnรฉgal in the place love your song"

**
13. obcervador el ojo clinico, 2019
"Kofee tu y yo un ft esta sรบper desde NICARAGUA respeto mรกximo bles"
-snip-
Google translate from Spanish to English
"you and me an ft is super from NICARAGUA respect maximum bles"

**
14. Damian Breaud, 2019
"I’m just a 20 something white dude from New Orleans, and Koffee is the truth!

What America has in resources it lacks in connection. Jamaica has a soul like no other, we could all learn a thing about it from yah."

**
15. Sequoia Spencer, 2019
"Shout out from Guyana ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡พ everywhere I go I hear this ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ"

**
REPLY
16. Chocolate Milk, 2019
"Yesss I'm from Guyana"

**
16. Alive and Sturdy, 2019
"Love from Nigeria ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ™Œ"

***
17. Tim Reginald, 2019
"This is lit me come all the way from Nigeria ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฌ gratitude is a must"

**
18. Natesha Walker, 2019
"Yow this song is all over the world I went to Japan and someone was listing this song beside me I'm like wtf"

**
19. Milton Fiallos, 2019
"I’m from Honduras but i live in USA and this song is fire ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ Koffee has talent ๐Ÿ™"

**
20. NEW AFRICA KEMET WOMAN, 2019
"KOFFEE WHEN ARE U COMING TO YOUR MOTHERLAND AFRICA .....ASK CHRONIXX TO BRING YOU NEXT TIME HE CHECK IN NAIROBI KENYA"

**
21. GRIMALDI 420, 2019
"African, Caribbean, European every one is jamming to this."

**
REPLY
22. Ted Grizzly, 2019
"Dominican ๐Ÿ™‚"

**
REPLY
23. Unbothered, 2019
"Ted Grizzly Dominicans are Caribbean"

**
REPLY
24. Ted Grizzly, 2019
"@Unbothered Me know that mon Taino Natives✊"

**
REPLY
25. Jaysen, 2019
"It’s trending #2 in America too"

**
REPLY
26. Unbothered, 2019
"Jaysen in America? Or the US"

**
REPLY
27. Jederi Elena, 2019
"Puerto Rican๐Ÿ˜ƒ"

**
REPLY
28. Titanoboa, 2019
"Yep, all of North, Central and South America, Europe, maybe Asia, and maybe Russia, probably Australia, and of course Africa. Good stuff... for everyone lol"

**
REPLY
29. Titanoboa, 2019
"Unbothered They are the same thing. America, US, USA. (United States of America)."

**
REPLY
30. Jamj, 2019
"CHINESE"

**
REPLY
31. pearl19851125, 2019
"@GRIMALDI 420 please, speak for yourself. I am from europe and i am not jamming to this."

**
REPLY
32. Kep Step,2019
"Jaysen no it’s not"

**
REPLY
33. neviใƒƒ, 2019
"@pearl19851125 then you're an outlier"

**
REPLY
34. Unbothered, 2019
"someone oh okay so the whole continent, got it :)"

**
REPLY
35. someone, 2019
"@Unbothered [profanity deleted] sorry I'm really tired and I meant to say the United States. I don't know about Canada, Central and South America."

**
REPLY
36. sai pimping, 2019
"Southeast Asia and pacific Island ๐ŸŒด"

**
REPLY
37. dcaramelone, 2019
"@pearl19851125 you here though. Lol"

**
38. dcaramelone, 2019
"๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฒJamaican๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฒshe bad!!"

**
39. yogi Constantine,2019
"American brazilian"

**
40. Sagar Gon, 2019
"Indian"

**
41. Lini Cookies,2019
"Trinidadian ๐Ÿ˜Œ๐Ÿ˜‰"

**
42. Lee T, 2019
"Brazilian here! This girl is fya๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ"

**
43. Leonard Lucia, 2019
"Nigerian"

**
44. Mr. Blackgames, 2019
"turkey"

**
45. Mimosa40 *****, 2019
"#1 in NYC here...i been jamming to this since last year."

**
46. Original Moana, 2019
"African Australian"

**
47. games of kevin, 2019
"Shout out from India ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ณ"

**
48. boyb martinez, 2019
"This is Trinidad's number one song right now ๐ŸŽต๐ŸŽค๐Ÿ”Š๐Ÿ’ฏ๐ŸŒ‹"

**
49. Keon Blake, 2019
"Correct king listening from san juan"

**
50. presley, 2019
"I'm listening from Colorado๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ฒ"

**
51. Wayne Checkley, 2019
"Listening to this in Netherlands ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฑ"

**
52. Goddess Athena, 2019
"Love from Indonesia๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฉ ๐Ÿ’•"

**
53. old Errol, 2019
"I'm in Jamaica right now and this song is everywhere"

**
54. Lisa Chionyera, 2019
"If listening this from Zim press the like option ❤๐Ÿ˜˜"
-snip-
"Zim" = Zimbabwe

**
55. Tshepiso Tau, 2019
"Shout out from South Africa ๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ฆ this is so amazing Koffee, Toast to you and your future successes❤️"

**
56. Sabrine BA, 2019
"I really love listening this song ! So positif and very agrรฉable ร  รฉcouter !! Support from Tunisia <3"

**
57. No Doubt, 2019
"shout out from Zimbabwe Gratitude is a must (yeah)"

**
58. Ghanim Alnaimi, 2019
"all the way from Qatar =) She's amazing"

**
59. Evans Odhiambo, 2019
"Just wondering if am the first Kenyan here!!!!"

**
60. Eilias C Banda, 2019
"Down down South Africa we we love the bit ...Advice though:Don’t lose urself as u grow in the industry ...so much love,keep up ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️"

**
61. zamora kenya, 2019
"waching from kenya this is becoming a banger in africa"

**
62. Malimobmafia Money, 2019
"Salute from somalia ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ด"

****
63. Pris Nwanah, 2019
"So much talent...we are ready for you in Nigeria. We love your cover of Burna boys song...a collaboration to come

**
64. Said Mohamed Mohamed, 2019
"reggaeman from Djibouti love this song, thank u all artist of Jamrock"

**
65. Mexico Goat, 2019
"Love from NYC ๐Ÿ—ฝ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ"

**
66. Arsenal Highbury, 2019
"WHO else is Jamaican?
If you are❤
If you aren't ๐Ÿ’ž
Because eveyone should be treated the same.
Love this song
I need to share and like

**
REPLY
67. Gail Mutuma, 2019
"๐Ÿ’ž I'm kenyan"

**
REPLY
68. Amber Willis, 2019
"I’m Jamaican"

**
REPLY
69. Dolphin Cove, 2019
"❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️"

**
REPLY
70. Aria Pringle, 2019
"๐Ÿ’ž Antigua ๐Ÿ˜"

**
REPLY
71. Rihanna Reid, 2019
"I am Jamaican and I live this song. It's playing every where."

**
REPLY
72. Arsenal Highbury, 2019
"@Rihanna Reid
Where in jamacia do you live
Kingston or Claridon or anywhere else
I live in Claridon"

**
73. Annalisa, 2019
"I'm Guyanese!"

**
REPLY
74. TheHolySpit OfBangtan, 2019
"Liberian ๐Ÿ’ž๐Ÿ’ž"

**
REPLY
75. Ieshia SheDiDThaT, 2019
"American here still listening"

**
REPLY
76. 2 1, 2019
"I'm jamaican"

**
REPLY
77. Pete Rose-Dale, 2019
"♥️, St Ann, representing the best parish in Jamaica"

**
REPLY
78. 2 1, 2019
"@Pete Rose-Dale me too. thats where i used to live"

**
REPLY
79. Skeemo Jounior, 2019
"WHO else is Jamaican? me"

**
80. Ntimama Mashipei, 2019
"+254 Kenya ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ"

**
81. agrichick, 2019
"Currently my daily anthem. Get goosebumps every time I listen! No nudity, vulgarity or flashy bling. Just pure, raw talent! Koffee you're going places girl! Blessings from your Caribbean neighbor, Trinidad and Tobago ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡น"

**
82. t roxly, 2019
"Any Zimbabwean here ?"

**
83. nabzlo, 2019
"๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ฒ Listening from Zambia.... Straight ๐Ÿ”ฅ"

**
84. Saeed Hassan, 2019
"LOVE THIS Blessings from Trinidad Koffee keep it up๐ŸŽ‰๐Ÿ‘Œ this is on every playlist now ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ’ฏ"

**
85. Tracey ann Nelson, 2019
"When you live in America and you’re a jamaican but your favorite song come on so you blasting it going down the highway!๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ”ฅ"

**
86. Rina Tappin, 2019
"Song Playing Everywhere in Trini, I Love Ittt... Use to Listen to Koffee before she even came this recognised, Such a Talented Young Lady, The Most High Blessings upon You Koffee! ❤️๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿ’š"

**
87. Prince Productions, 2019
"iwas in jamacia when me ear about tis then i came to canada and here tis song on the radio and always sing to it"

**
88. bar bie, 2019
"Cant wait to see u perform in Lucia ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡จ VIP ticket . I deh"

**
89. Toots Braddock, 2019
"I'm jamming it in Australia.. Mean fresh sound"

**
90. Stardust1111, 2019
"Can't wait to see you in Trinidad for the Buju concert!"

**
91. Nerillee Cal, 2019
"Fell in love with this song.. Belize have this song on replay๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฟ"

**
92. mike brad, 2019
"This song still on fire here in Belize.๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ”ฅ"

**
93. Blah Blah, 2019
"Playing on repeat all day! ๐ŸŽถ๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ’œlove from London"

**
94. Charles Mutaganda, 2019
"I passed through nairobi while an in transit and it was everywhere"

**
REPLY
95. Boi Mesa, 2019
"Siiick!! Is there a lot of music like this in Nairobi?"

**
96. A Ks, 2019
"Love from India......"

**
97. Stickz Rpg, 2019
"This is my Summer track when the Sun finally hit London"

**
98. puppy lover your mom, 2019
"Love from the jamericans๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ"
-snip-
"Jamericans" is a made up colloquial referent for Jamaicans who live in the United States or in Canada.

**
99. Raphael Fraser, 2019
"Love๐Ÿ’“and kisses ๐Ÿ˜˜ from Suriname๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ท"

**
100. jobo, 2019
"JAMAICA REPRESENT ✊๐Ÿพ ๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฒ"

**
101. Nahzia Skye, 2019
"Heard this playing in the Bahamas!!! YESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS"

**
103. Emmanuel Eban, 2019
"nigerioa rep...we say keep the star shining"

****
This concludes Part II of this three part pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.