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Wednesday, April 17, 2019

"Tampa", A Version Of The Song "Funky Butt" ("Buddy Bolden's Blues") Sung By Zora Neale Hurston In 1928

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a pancocojams series of the song "Funky Butt" (also known as "Buddy Bolden's Blues").

Part II presents information about Zora Neale Hurston and showcases a variant form of "Funky Butt" called "Tampa" that was sung by folklorist and author Zora Neale Hurston from her childhood memories of growing up in Florida.

A segment of a YouTube video that features the song "Tampa" is highlighted in this post along with my transcription of that recording.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/04/online-excerpts-about-song-funky-butt.html for Part I of this series. Part I presents various excerpts from online sites that provide information about the African American song "Funky Butt" (also known as "Buddy Bolden's Blues"). Some of these excerpts include lyrics.

A 1939 YouTube example of this song that is performed by Jelly Roll Morton and a later YouTube example of this song that is sung by Sidney Betchet are also included in this post along with selected comments from those sound files' discussion threads.

The content of this post is presented for historical, cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who composed or helped influence the composition and documentation of early examples of this song. Special thanks to folklorist/author Zora Neale Hurston.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT ZORA NEALE HURSTON
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zora_Neale_Hurston
"Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891[1][2] – January 28, 1960) was an influential author of African-American literature and an anthropologist, who portrayed racial struggles in the early-20th-century American South, and published research on Haitian voodoo.[3] The most popular of her four novels is Their Eyes Were Watching God, published in 1937. She also wrote more than 50 short stories, plays, and essays.

Hurston was born in Notasulga, Alabama, and moved with her family to Eatonville, Florida, in 1894. She later used Eatonville as the setting for many of her stories. It is now the site of the Zora! Festival, held each year in her honor.[4]

In her early career, Hurston conducted anthropological and ethnographic research while a student at Barnard College and Columbia University.[5] She had an interest in African-American and Caribbean folklore, and how these contributed to the community's identity."...

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: Zora Neale Hurston Fieldwork 1928



Andrew Rasmussen, Published on Aug 11, 2013

I do not claim anything original from this video.

The film was shot by Hurston in 1928 and I got it from here: https://www.floridamemory.com/audio/hurston.php

The audio is Hurston herself, as recorded in the mid 1930's. You can [sic] these tunes and more here:
-snip-
Note that the publisher mistakenly indicates that this film was recorded in 1930, when he had previously noted that the film was shot by Hurston in 1928.

****
LYRICS FOR "TAMPA"*
(as sung by Zora Neal Hurston)

[Hurston speaking beginning at 1:34 in the film]

"This is a song called “Tampa”. I’ve known it ever since I could remember. So I don’t know who taught it to me, but I heard it sung in my native village when I was a child. Now this was sung by the old folks of course.

[song actually begins at 1:50-2:38]

Thought I heard somebody say
Your nasty butt, your stinky butt
Take it away.
Ah, Your nasty butt, your sticky butt
Take it away.

Ah, I do not want it in here.
Oh, I do not want it in here

Oh, I’m so glad Mr. Bolden** says
The women in Tampa gotta wipe their ass.
Oh, the women in Tampa gotta wipe their ass.

Oh, do not want it in here.

Oh, I thought I heard somebody shout.
Open the window, let the stink go out.
Oh, open the window, let the stink go out.

Oh, yes I heard somebody say

Your nasty butt, your stinky butt
Take it away.
Your nasty butt, your stinky butt
Take it away.
I do not want it in here.
-snip-
*Transcription by Azizi Powell from the song in the Hurston's 1928 film.

**I’m not sure about this name., but I wrote it because it is used in other examples of this song.

Additions and corrections are welcome.

Read the comments that are included in Part I of this pancocojams series that suggests that this is a folk song and not a song that was composed by Buddy Bolden or one of this fellow musicians in the early 1900s.

****
This concludes Part II of this two part pancocojams series on the song "Funky Butt".

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Online Excerpts About The Song "Funky Butt" (Also Known As "Buddy Bolden's Blues") with YouTube examples

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a pancocojams series of the song "Funky Butt" (also known as "Buddy Bolden's Blues").

Part I presents various excerpts from online sites that provide information about the African American song "Funky Butt" (also known as "Buddy Bolden's Blues"). Some of these excerpts include lyrics.

A 1939 YouTube example of this song that is performed by Jelly Roll Morton and a later YouTube example of this song that is sung by Sidney Betchet are also included in this post along with selected comments from those sound files' discussion threads.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/04/tampa-version-of-song-funky-butt-buddy.html for Part II of this pancocojams series. Part II presents a variant form of "Funky Butt" called "Tampa" that was sung by folklorist and author Zora Neale Hurston from her childhood memories of growing up in Florida. A segment of a YouTube video that features that song is highlighted in this post along with my transcription of that recording.

The content of this post is presented for historical, cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who composed or helped influence the composition and documentation of early examples of this song. Special thanks to Jazz pioneer Buddy Bolden.
-snip-
Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/02/how-funky-came-to-mean-something-good.html for a 2015 pancocojams post entitled "How "Funky" Came To Mean Something Good (African American Vernacular Meanings)"

****
ONLINE EXCERPTS ABOUT THE SONG "FUNKY BUTT" (BUDDY BOLDEN'S BLUES)
These excerpts are given in no particular order and are numbered for referencing purposes only.

Excerpt #1:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddy_Bolden
"Charles Joseph "Buddy" Bolden (September 6, 1877 – November 4, 1931) was an African-American cornetist who was regarded by contemporaries as a key figure in the development of a New Orleans style of ragtime music, or "jass", which later came to be known as jazz.

Musical career
Bolden was known as "King" Bolden[4] (see Jazz royalty), and his band was popular in New Orleans from around 1900 to 1907. He was known for his loud sound and improvisational skills, and his style had an impact on younger musicians. Bolden's trombonist Willie Cornish (among others) recalled making phonograph cylinder recordings with the Bolden band, but there are no known surviving copies.[5]

Many early jazz musicians credited Bolden and his bandmates with having originated what came to be known as jazz, though the term was not in common musical use until after the era of Bolden's prominence. At least one writer has labeled Bolden the father of jazz.[6] He is credited with creating a looser, more improvised version of ragtime and adding blues; Bolden's band was said to be the first to have brass instruments play the blues. He was also said to have adapted ideas from gospel music heard in uptown African-American Baptist churches.

Instead of imitating other cornetists, Bolden played music he heard "by ear" and adapted it to his horn. In doing so, he created an exciting and novel fusion of ragtime, black sacred music, marching-band music, and rural blues.

[...]

One of the most famous Bolden numbers is "Funky Butt" (later known as "Buddy Bolden's Blues"), which represents one of the earliest references to the concept of funk in popular music. Bolden's "Funky Butt" was, as Danny Barker once put it, a reference to the olfactory effect of an auditorium packed full of sweaty people "dancing close together and belly rubbing."[8] "Funky Butt" was one of many in the Bolden repertory with rude or off-color lyrics popular in some of the rougher places where he played; Bolden's trombonist Willy Cornish claimed authorship. It became so well known as a rude song that even whistling the melody on a public street was considered offensive. The melody was incorporated into an early published ragtime number, "St. Louis Tickle.""...

****
Excerpt #2
From https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=77516
1. Subject: Lyr Req: Buddy Bolden's Blues
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 19 Jan 05 - 08:22 PM

This is a song I learned so long ago that I've forgotten some of the lines. This is what I remember..

I thought I heard Buddy Bolden say
It's nasty but, funky but, take it away
It's nasty but, funky but, take it away
I thought I heard him say

I thought I heard Buddy Bolden shout
Open up the window let the bad air out
Open up the window let the bad air out
I thought I heard him shout

Those are all the words I ever heard.”...

**
2. Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Buddy Bolden's Blues
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Jan 05 - 09:48 PM

...."Paul Oliver, in his book "Screening the Blues," p. 168, says only the first verse of "Funky Butt" was sung originally, and other verses were added about Storyville characters as time went on. I haven't found any of these, but they might appear on various early recordings. The tune is supposed to be Bolden's.

Jelly Roll's "Buddy Bolden's Blues" [is] a late recording (1939)."...

**
3. Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Buddy Bolden's Blues
From: GUEST,Joseph Scott
Date: 14 Nov 14 - 01:48 PM

"Funky Butt" was a folk song known across the South. That's why Zora Neale Hurston (of Alabama and Florida) and John Hurt knew it, and why Newman White recalled hearing a folk variant in North Carolina in about 1903. (Hurston, Hurt, and White were both all born about 1892, even though Hurston sometimes falsely claimed about a decade younger.) Bolden has no special claim on "Funky Butt" in that context.

As most performed "Funky Butt," it didn't bear all that much relationship to the "blues" songs. Claims that Buddy Bolden performed blues have been mostly based on defining "blues" broadly enough to include... folk songs that he did play, such as "Careless Love." But he may have played the tune that sometimes had lyrics about "2:19," which is what we generally consider a blues tune.

The Ossman-Dudley Trio recorded "Funky Butt" as one of the strains in "St. Louis Tickle" in January 1906. If we consider "Funky Butt" a "blues," then the guitarist in that trio, George Dudley, was the first guitarist to record "blues." But simply calling "Funky Butt" a "blues" is being arbitrarily broad about what we call a "blues" -- too broad, imo."...

**
4. Subject: Lyr Req: BUDDY BOLDEN'S BLUES (f/Jelly Roll Morton
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 15 Nov 14 - 06:48 PM

BUDDY BOLDEN'S BLUES (2:49)
As sung by Jelly Roll Morton on "Last Sessions: The Complete General Recordings" (Verve, 1997)

Thought I heard Buddy Bolden say:
"You're nasty; you're dirty; take it away.
You're terrible; you're awful; take it away."
I thought I heard him say.

I thought I heard Buddy Bolden shout:
"Open up that window and let that bad air out.
Open up that window and let the foul air out."
I though I heard Buddy Bolden say.

Thought I heard Judge Fogarty say:
"Thirty days in the market; take him away.
Get him a good broom to sweep with; take him away."
I thought I heard him say.

Thought I heard Frankie Duson shout:
"Gal, gimme that money; I'm gonna beat it out.
I mean, gimme that money like I explain ya; I'm gonna beat it out."
'Cause I thought I heard Frankie Duson say.

* * *
BUDDY BOLDEN'S BLUES (4:07)
As sung and narrated by Jelly Roll Morton on "The Anamule Dance: The Library of Congress Recordings, Vol. 2" (Rounder, 1993)

This is like one of the earliest blues. This no doubt is the earliest blues ... the real deal, that is, a variation from the real barrelhouse blues. The composer was Buddy Bolden, the most powerful trumpet player I've ever heard, or ever was known. The name of this was named by some old honky-tonk people. While he played this, they sang a little theme to it. He was a favorite in New Orleans at the time.

I thought I heard Buddy Bolden say:
"Dirty nasty stinky butt, take it away.
Dirty nasty stinky butt, take it away.
Oh, Mister Bolden, play."

I thought I heard Bolden play:
"Dirty nasty stinky butt, take it away.
Funky butt, stinky butt, take it away
And let Mister Bolden play."

Later on this tune was, uh, I guess I'd have to say stolen, by some author I don't know anything about—I don't remember his name—and published under the title of "St. Louis Tickler" [sic]. But there's all the proof in the world that this tune was wrote by Buddy Bolden. Plenty old musicians know it. — Oh, this number is no doubt about nineteen-two.... [There is more talk that I have omitted.--JD]

**
5. Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Buddy Bolden's Blues
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 15 Nov 14 - 07:30 PM

This is apparently the "stolen" version that Jelly Roll Morton was referring to:

ST. LOUIS TICKLE
[an instrumental piece scored for piano]
Music by "Barney & Seymour" *
©1904 by Victor Kremer Co.,
Copyright assigned 1912 to Harold Rossiter Music Co., Chicago.

* The catalog entry at the University of Mississippi has this annotation:
"Barney & Seymour is a pseudonym for Theron Catlan Bennett (1879-1937)"”...

**
6. Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Buddy Bolden's Blues
From: GUEST,Joseph Scott
Date: 15 May 16 - 03:11 AM

"Version of "Funky Butt" in E. C. Perrow's notes, probably from about 1909. (See "E.C. Perrow original manuscripts online" thread.) Not included in Perrow's 1910s multipart article.

Version of "Funky Butt" in E. C. Perrow's notes, probably from about 1909. (See "E.C. Perrow original manuscripts online" thread.) Not included in Perrow's 1910s multipart article.

I.
Here comes a little girl with a red dress on.
She's got pocky butt, funky butt
Shore as you born.

II.
I thought I heard somebody shout
Open the door and let the funk out.
Pocky butt Funky butt Take it away.

III.
I will give 8 or 10 more verses" "

****
Excerpt #3
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funk#Etymology
"In early jam sessions, musicians would encourage one another to "get down" by telling one another, "Now, put some stank on it!". At least as early as 1907, jazz songs carried titles such as Funky. The first example is an unrecorded number by Buddy Bolden, remembered as either "Funky Butt" or "Buddy Bolden's Blues" with improvised lyrics that were, according to Donald M. Marquis, either "comical and light" or "crude and downright obscene" but, in one way or another, referring to the sweaty atmosphere at dances where Bolden's band played.[6][7] As late as the 1950s and early 1960s, when "funk" and "funky" were used increasingly in the context of jazz music, the terms still were considered indelicate and inappropriate for use in polite company. According to one source, New Orleans-born drummer Earl Palmer "was the first to use the word 'funky' to explain to other musicians that their music should be made more syncopated and danceable."[8] The style later evolved into a rather hard-driving, insistent rhythm, implying a more carnal quality. This early form of the music set the pattern for later musicians.[9] The music was identified as slow, sexy, loose, riff-oriented and danceable."...

****
SHOWCASE YOUTUBE EXAMPLES
Example #1: Jelly Roll Morton - Buddy Bolden's Blues [1939]



Morahman7vnNo2, Published on Feb 2, 2009

Jelly Roll Morton playing and singing his composition of "Buddy Bolden's Blues"
-snip-
Here's information about Jelly Roll Morton:
"Ferdinand Joseph LaMothe (October 20, 1890 – July 10, 1941), known professionally as Jelly Roll Morton, was an American ragtime and early jazz pianist, bandleader and composer who started his career in New Orleans, Louisiana." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jelly_Roll_Morton

Here are some selected comments from this sound file's discussion thread, with numbers added for referencing purposes only.
1. suthern, 2011
"it's interesting that this is buddy bolden's blues...there is a recording on here of zora neale hurston singing it (she calls it Tampa)...saying it was a folksong she remembered from her childhood in fl, and that everybody sang it and performed it at dances. Buddy Bolden was only 13 years older than Zora, so I doubt he was the catalyst there...anybody know how this song wound up being buddy bolden's blues?"

**
2. oncexist, 2011
"This is certainly not Morton's composition. Morton accredits this one to Buddy Bolden himself and says that the "St. Louis Tickler" is just a theft as somebody copyrighted it. This was after Bolden used to play it regulary by himself in Lincorn Park with his bell headed to downtown New Orleans (about 10-12 miles away)

Anyway this is what Morton tells Lomax in the congress library. Much of this series is dubious but more in the sense that Morton takes credit, not gives.

**
3. pianiplunker, 2011
"@oncexist I would assume it was a folk tune which Bolden popularized to his audiences. Since Bolden was institutionalized in 1907 he probably played the tune well before it was published. Although Jelly Roll Morton was a great chronicler of the underworld he was not a musicologist."

**
4.
gfjchs3n1, 2011
"@IndependentGeorge76 My grandfather is Frank Duson, Jr. (correct spelling) that you have mentioned here. He had two dgts one of which is my mother. Her sister is deceased. He raised them til his death in the late 30's. Their mother died 5 yrs earlier. Heard he was a character but loved and took care of his little family which was during the early 30's. Thanks for the post. Check out Donald Marquis' book, "IN SEARCH OF BUDDY BOLDEN".
-snip-
This comment refers to musician Frank Duson, who Jelly Roll Morton didn't get along with. In hi version of this song, Morton characterized Duson as a pimp.

****
Example #2: Jelly Roll Morton-I Thought I Heard Buddy Bolden Say



paintpot2, Published on Oct 24, 2009

I thought I heard buddy bolden say.
You're nasty, you're dirty. Take it away !
You're terrible, you're awful. Take it away.
I thought I heard him say !

I thought I heard buddy bolden shout.
Open up that window, let that bad air out !
Open up that window, let the foul air out !
I thought I heard him say !

ah mr. jelly lord !! one of morton's greatest tunes ! he sings a couple of lines and his greatness becomes immortal ! sidney bechet is fantastic on anything !
-snip-
Pancocojams Editor's Note: To clarify, the singer in this sound file is Sidney Bechet, and not Jelly Roll Morton.

I'm not sure when this sound file was recorded. If you know that date, please add that information in the comments below. Thanks!

Here's information about Sidney Bechet:
"Sidney Bechet (May 14, 1897 – May 14, 1959) was an American jazz saxophonist, clarinetist, and composer. He was one of the first important soloists in jazz, beating trumpeter Louis Armstrong to the recording studio by several months." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidney_Bechet

1. bengreens, 2011
"Amazing solo by Bechet here! (all the players are amazing, but man!) Thanks for posting. Time to get lost in YouTube . . . will start by following Bechet, but god knows where I'll end up.

**
2. RaananVolesPianist, 2013
"I think I read somewhere that the original lyrics were "I thought I heard Buddy Bolden say, you dirty, funky, nasty butt, take it away..."

**
3. K K, 2013
"Ranaan Voles, you're right, that was more or less the original lyrics, which I believe was banned in the city for indecency. A sad day for NOLA, which the new "noise ordinance" multiplies a millionfold."
-snip-
Both Jelly Roll Morton and Sidney Bechet were Creoles from New Orleans, Louisiana (USA). Historically, Creoles of color were largely considered to be Black Americans and are largely considered to be Black Americans now.

****
This concludes Part I of this two part pancocojams series on the song "Funky Butt".

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Toots And The Maytals - "Funky Kingston" (YouTube sound file & selected comments)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part III of a three part series about Toots And The Maytals, an iconic Jamaican Ska & Rocksteady music group.

Part III showcases a YouTube sound of file of Toots And The Maytals' "Funky Kingston" and documents selected comments from the discussion thread of that sound file.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/04/information-about-iconic-jamaican-ska.html for Part I of this series. Part I presents information about Toots And The Maytals and showcases a YouTube video of the group's song "54-46 That's My Number." Information about that song is included in this post along with a link to that song's lyrics.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/04/toots-and-maytals-song-funky-kingston.html for Part II of this pancocojams series. Part II presents information about the Toots And The Maytals' song "Funky Kingston". This post also showcases a YouTube video of Toots And The Maytals performing "Funky Kingston", and includes the lyrics to that song.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Toots And The Maytals for their musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

****
SHOWCASE SOUND FILE: Toots & The Maytals - Funky Kingston



Alvaro SΓ‘nchez, Published on Nov 5, 2009
-snip-
Statistics: as of April 16, 2019 3:32 PM EST
total views - 2,717,446

total likes - 15,000

total dislikes - 275

total comments - 464
-snip-
Information about Kingston, Jamaica
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingston,_Jamaica
"Kingston is the capital and largest city of Jamaica, located on the southeastern coast of the island....
In the Americas, Kingston is the largest predominantly English-speaking city south of the United States."...

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS SOUND FILE'S DISCUSSION THREAD
This compilation presents selected comments from a sound file for the song "Funky Kingston" by Toots and the Maytals. Numbers are added for referencing purposes only.

Disclaimer: I didn't read all of the comments in that discussion thread, but I did read A LOT of them. I believe that these selected comments are representative of the comments in that entire discussion thread.

1. Thefog666, 2010
"funny how most people only know this from GTA, i known this song since i was little, probably cause my mom and dad used to play this stuff all the time. back in the day. Ruddy Brilliant!
-snip-
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Theft_Auto:_San_Andreas
Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas is an action-adventure video game developed by Rockstar North and published by Rockstar Games. It was released on 26 October 2004 for PlayStation 2, and on 7 June 2005 for Microsoft Windows and Xbox. A high definition remastered version received a physical release for both Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 on 30 June 2015 and 1 December 2015, respectively.

[...]

Considered one of the sixth generation of video gaming's most significant titles, and by many reviewers to be one of the greatest video games ever made, San Andreas received rave reviews by many critics who praised the music, story and gameplay. It became the best-selling video game of 2004, and has sold over 27.5 million copies worldwide as of 2011;[3] it remains the best-selling PlayStation 2 game of all time."...
**
2. Omer, 2011
"haha it's the miami ink theme song :P"
-snip-
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miami_Ink
"“Miami Ink is an American reality show on TLC that follows the events that took place at a tattoo parlour in Miami Beach, Florida. The show premiered in July 2005 and finished broadcasting its sixth and final season in 2008.[1] The show led to several spin-offs, including the shows LA Ink, London Ink, NY Ink, and Madrid Ink, some of which are also broadcast on TLC.[1]”

**
3. A2Z11tree, 2012
"Yeeee, I live in Funky Kingston... Ontario"
-snip-
Ontario, Canada

Comment #36 below is another example of prefacing the name of your city with the place name "Kingston". This probably implies that your city is also "funky" ("cool", "hip").

**
4. Bruno Prestat, 2012
"trop superbe pour mettre des commentaires. from nowher in France"
-snip-
Google translate from French to English
"Too superb to put comments"

**
5. Xamuri Rimura, 2012
"brasil e jamaica punks e skins unit! lindo som"
-snip-
Google translate from Portuguese to English
"brazil and jamaica punks and skins unit[e]! Beautiful sound"

**
6. fizzska, 2012
"love this tuuune reggae for ever"

**
7. Bullzown, 2012
"Alot of us now this song because of the PLEBS :) Itv2 comedy :)"
-snip-
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plebs_(TV_series)
"Plebs is a British television series broadcast on ITV2"...

**
8. Justin Tyme, 2013
"London calling In the Groove!"
-snip-
This is one example in this compilation of what I refer to as a "nation signing comment". "Nation signing in" comments serve as "shout outs" (brief public acknowledgements/greetings and/or praises) for a particular song and/or singer/s. These comments document the global reach of a particular song, singer/s, and particular musical genres by serving as a "roll-call" of the nations (and sometimes also from ethnic groups, language groups, cities/states etc.) that know this song/singer and are enthusiastic about this song/singer. I'm not sure if the comment given below (#9) was written in response to this "nation signing in" custom, but, either way, it nicely sums up one of the main purposes for that custom.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/04/examples-of-nation-signing-in-comments.html for more information about and examples of "nation signing comments" from the discussion thread of a Nigerian Afrobeat record by Wizkid.

**
9. Jent Borgstijn, 2013
"so, It's a sort of a tribute and the song is awesome haha"

**
10. Chris topher, 2013
"If it weren't for the old school masters like Toots all these modern so called Pop artists could and would not exist..who would they copy from? Great piece of music!"

**
11. Vocal viv, 2014
"wicked.... lovin it.."

**
12. Mario Gomez, 2014
"You can't beat the classics,...Woooooooooooooooo! 1"

**
13. LIFE LIBERTY RADNESS, 2015
"One of the greatest jams ever."

**
14. lasarousi, 2014
"i hate that pitbull sampled this song which is a classic by its own and perfect roots."

**
REPLY
15. felix, 2014
"Actually TJR sampled.."

**
REPLY
16. i2Shea, 2015
"+lasarousi Sampled? Lmfao he pretty much stole the song word for word. He's a pathetic excuse for an "artist". More than half of his songs are just stolen from music made years and years ago."

**
REPLY
17. Giuseppe LoGiurato, 2015
"I'm so glad that I don't know who this pitbull person is/was... he sounds like he might be a lame person who needs to steal other's good ideas..."

**
REPLY
18. tam 1445, 2016
"lasarousi omg I just heard this on the radio and I thought "wow, this sounds like that pit bull song". Sad"

**
REPLY
17. igotasweetass, 2018
"^this. i wouldn't mind if he sampled a bit. No he straight up took the whole song. I hope toot's got his."

**
18. Jagoff PhD, 2019
"TJR sampled and then sold it to pitbull so this song got double raped"

**
19. Rootslove, 2015
"Toots is Roots ..."

**
REPLY
20. caleb basile, 2017
"Root toot ska-boot"

**
REPLY
21. MrViperVip, 2017
"doot doot"

**
22. yeye, 2017
"Ye but "do the raggay" of the same band give his name to that new style betwin the Roots, the ska, the rock and thΓ© soul ;)"

**
23. GoodIceMaster, 2015
"I actually came here from a video game, shark tales."

**
REPLY
24. Master Of Disaster, 2017
"Gta San Andreas! πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚"

**
REPLY
25. Chance Vought, 2016
"And Scarface The World Is Yours :D"

**
26. Tracy Turner, 2017
"Plebs brought me here. Salve Grumio!"

**
REPLY
27. Marron Giant, 2017
"This song is similar to the plebs closing theme"

**
28. Ping Pong, 2016
"Just hearing this on the UK movie 'County Kilburn'!"

**
29. T-Zay, 2016
"Kingston native here!"

**
30. Abraham Palmer, 2016
"Legit song. Reggae use to be awesome back then 70s/80s."

**
REPLY
31. Abraham Palmer, 2016
"Is true I notice that too even the production of reggae nowadays is so artificial"

**
REPLY
32. Fat Max, 2017
"I agree, some is, but check out Chronixx. He is the next big thing in reggae, true legend."

**
33. ArchosR14, 2017
"who's here because they were looking for the end credits song from plebs..."

**
29. chasmanian remakas, 2017
"Been jamming to this for quite some time and it still moves me every time I listen too it. Always keep it rolling!"

**
30. paul elliott, 2017
"Toots, and the mighty Maytals rocking it out in the best way
Cool groove"

**
31. David Washburn, 2017
"Such a great song from an amazing man / group. I've been lucky to see Toots and the Maytalls 5 or 6 times and loved every show. The last time, a few years ago he was close to 70yrs old and hadn't slowed down a bit. He never phones in a show, he works every one. At one show he was wearing a light purple shirt and a dark leather vest. He was working the crowd and having fun with the band and giving it everything. He took off his vest, obviously hot from the effort, and he had sweat so completely under the vest, it looked like he still had it on as the light purple shirt and turned dark and wet matching the vest outline. See him while you can!"

**
32. Jaibi Tico, 2017
"Que piezotaa....!!! Calidad de reggae..!!!! Buenas vibras desde Costa Rica πŸ€™πŸ»πŸ‡¨πŸ‡·"
-snip-
Google translate from Spanish to English
"What piezotaa .... !!! Reggae quality .. !!!! Good vibes from Costa Rica πŸ€™πŸ»πŸ‡¨πŸ‡·"

**
33. Pigmeat Martin, 2017
"A favorite since I was a young boy. It spawned a ton of knockoffs like "Funky Nassau" and "Funky Lagos" to name a few. Anywhere this was played someone would cut a knock off, it was too damned good of a groove to waste."

**
34. ruiz Lomas Cajun Trujillo, 2017
"this is the maytals but recorded as "The Flames" cause they didn´t had their own "rights" at the moment..."

**
35. Crypto Steve, 2018
"Toots and the Maytals have so many classic hits that everyone knows...and many don't realize how active and groundbreaking the group was. Much love and respect to Toots and the Maytals!"

**
36. Rianna Ricco, 2018
"❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️ from Kingston, London"

**
37. Gehan Dileepa, 2019
"Narcos Mexico!!!11"

**
38. Pynner, 2019
"Man, I didn't discover this original until like 5 years after I heard Funky Vodka!
They didn't change much, probably should have called it a "remix"."

**
39. SANDIEGOROOTS™, 2019
"Just this "Toots and the Maytals " Funky Kingston" Lp OG press out diggin' for vinyl today! Love this track as well as " Pressure Drop" on this record !"

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This concludes Part III of this three part series on Toots And The Maytals.

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Toots And The Maytals' song "Funky Kingston" (with video & lyric)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a three part series about Toots And The Maytals, an iconic Jamaican Ska & Rocksteady music group.

Part II presents information about the Toots And The Maytals' song "Funky Kingston". This post also showcases a YouTube video of Toots And The Maytals performing "Funky Kingston", and includes the lyrics to that song.

Update: April 17, 2019: The Addendum to this post presents a (music) definition for the word "funk" and information about "Funk music".

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/04/information-about-iconic-jamaican-ska.html for Part I of this series. Part I presents information about Toots And The Maytals and showcases a YouTube video of the group's song "54-46 That's My Number." Information about that song is included in this post along with a link to that song's lyrics.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2019/04/toots-and-maytals-funky-kingston.html for Part III of this series. Part III showcases a YouTube sound of file of Toots And The Maytals' "Funky Kingston" and documents selected comments from the discussion thread of that sound file.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Toots And The Maytals for their musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

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SHOWCASE VIDEO: Funky Kingston - Toots and the Maytals



connectartists, Published on Aug 23, 2009
-snip-
Statistics: as of April 16, 2019 2:13 PM EST
total views - 547,411
total likes - 3,300
total dislikes - 25
total comments - 157

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE ALBUM AND SONG "FUNKY KINGSTON"
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funky_Kingston
"Funky Kingston is the name of two albums by reggae singing group Toots and the Maytals. The first was issued in Jamaica and the United Kingdom in 1972 on Dragon Records, DRLS 5002, a subsidiary label of Island Records, owned by Chris Blackwell.[2] A different album, with the same cover and title, was issued in the United States in 1975 on Mango Records, MLPS 9330. That album peaked at #164 on the Billboard 200 and was voted the eleventh best album of 1975 in the annual Pazz & Jop poll.[3] In 2003, the American version was placed at number 378 on Rolling Stone's list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[4]

[...]

Context
When the music for this album was recorded at Dynamic Sound Studios in Kingston, reggae music was little known outside of its native Jamaica, other than in musical circles. The first international release by The Wailers, Catch A Fire, would not be until 1973. Awareness of reggae began to change in 1972 with the release of the seminal film The Harder They Come (1972), which became a cult hit that year in the UK, with its soundtrack featuring two numbers by the Maytals.[7] The Maytals had been consistent hit makers in Jamaica during the 1960s, and had even given the genre its name with their single "Do the Reggay". As he would with the Wailers the following year, producer Chris Blackwell tailored the Maytals for the international market on this album.[8]

Appearances in other media
The title track, "Funky Kingston", appears in the Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas video game soundtrack, on the fictitious radio station K-Jah West. It also features as the opening theme for the reality show Miami Ink. It was the basis for the "Funky Vodka" track, which in turn fueled "Don't Stop The Party". The song can be heard in the film "Notes On A Scandal" where the Hart family can be seen dancing to it. The song "Time Tough" was featured on the soundtrack for Tony Hawk's Project 8.”...
-snip-
The song “Funky Kingston” is a track on Side One of the album with the same name.
“Funky Vodka” was recorded by ___
“Don’t Stop The Party” was recorded by Pittbull

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LYRICS: FUNKY KINGSTON
(Frederick "Toots" Hibbert)

Everybody, give it to me! Uh!
Hey Hey Hey Hey Hey!
Yeah! Oh yeah
Hey Hey Hey Hey Hey!

I want you to believe every word I say
I want you to believe everything I do
I said music is what I've got to give
And I've got to find some way to make it
Music is what I've got baby
I want you to come on and shake it
Shake it, shake it baby
Oh yeah, hey
Na na na
Oh yeah! Na na na

Funky, Funky, Funky
Funky Kingston, is what I've got for you
Oh yeah
Funky Kingston, yeah, is what I've got for you
Funky Kingston, oh yeah
Oh!
Uh! (x9)
Lemme hear your, funky guitar
Eh Eh! Eh Eh! Eh Eh!
Yo reggae
Hear the piano, stick it to me, stick to me

Na Na Na Na
Oh yeah, alright, oh yeah
Watch me now
You watch me now
Playing from east to west yeah
I just play from north to south, yeah
I love black America
People keep on asking me for, Funky Kingston!
But I ain't got none
Somebody take it away from me


Source: https://genius.com/Toots-and-the-maytals-funky-kingston-lyrics

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ADDENDUM- (MUSIC) DEFINITION FOR "FUNKY" AND INFORMATION ABOUT "FUNK MUSIC"
Funky
a) of or related to funk music

b) something or someone that is "cool", "hip" (and the same or similar newer superlatives)
-snip-
These definitions are different from the "smelly", "odorous", "nasty", "stinky" (and "stinking") meaning of "funky". However, if music is really funky, it will cause people to sweat while they "get down", i.e. dance/perform soulfully without inhibitions, including dance close to the ground. Also, “getting down and dirty" means playing music and dancing with all your heart. In so doing, those people and that place will smell funky (stink).

Note that one contemporary African American vernacular meaning of "nasty" is to perform or otherwise do something very well.

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Excerpt #1:
From https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/17228/where-does-funk-and-or-funky-come-from-and-why-the-musical-reference answered by Callithumpian Mar 22 '11
"As the Wikipedia entry on Funk indicates, Yale art historian Robert Farris Thompson has posited an African origin to the musical use of funky. Here is an expanded quote from his 1984 work, Flash of the Spirit: African and Afro-American Art and Philosophy:
The slang term 'funky' in black communities originally referred to strong body odor, and not to 'funk,' meaning fear or panic. The black nuance seems to derive from the Ki-Kongo lu-fuki, 'bad body odor,' and is perhaps reinforced by contact with fumet, 'aroma of food and wine,' in French Louisiana. But the Ki-Kongo word is closer to the jazz word 'funky' in form and meaning, as both jazzmen and Bakongo use 'funky' and lu-fuki to praise persons for the integrity of their art, for having 'worked out' to achieve their aims. In Kongo today it is possible to hear an elder lauded in this way: 'like, there is a really funky person!--my soul advances toward him to receive his blessing (yati, nkwa lu-fuki! Ve miela miami ikwenda baki) Fu-Kiau Bunseki, a leading native authority on Kongo culture, explains: 'Someone who is very old, I go sit with him, in order to feel his lu-fuki, meaning, I would like to be blessed by him.' For in Kongo the smell of a hardworking elder carries luck. This Kongo sign of exertion is identified with the positive energy of a person. Hence, 'funk' in black American jazz parlance can mean earthiness, a return to fundamentals.
"

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Excerpt #2:
From https://uselessetymology.com/2017/11/25/the-etymology-of-funk/
....“a rhythmic, danceable new form of music through a mixture of soul music, jazz, and rhythm and blues (R&B).”...

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Excerpt #2: From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funk
"Funk is a music genre that originated in African-American communities in the mid-1960s when African-American musicians created a rhythmic, danceable new form of music through a mixture of soul music, jazz, and rhythm and blues (R&B). Funk de-emphasizes melody and chord progressions and focuses on a strong rhythmic groove of a bass line played by an electric bassist and a drum part played by a drummer. Like much of African-inspired music, funk typically consists of a complex groove with rhythm instruments playing interlocking grooves. Funk uses the same richly colored extended chords found in bebop jazz, such as minor chords with added sevenths and elevenths, or dominant seventh chords with altered ninths and thirteenths.

Funk originated in the mid-1960s, with James Brown's development of a signature groove that emphasized the downbeat—with heavy emphasis on the first beat of every measure ("The One"), and the application of swung 16th notes and syncopation on all bass lines, drum patterns, and guitar riffs.[2] Other musical groups, including Sly and the Family Stone, the Meters, and Parliament-Funkadelic, soon began to adopt and develop Brown's innovations. While much of the written history of funk focuses on men, there have been notable funk women, including Chaka Khan, Labelle, Lyn Collins, Brides of Funkenstein, Klymaxx, Mother's Finest, and Betty Davis."...
-snip-
The words that are written in italics were given that way in this article.

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This concludes Part II of this three part pancocojams series on Toots And The Maytals.

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Visitor comments are welcome.