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Thursday, May 13, 2021

An Example Of TikTok Popularizing Songs: "Iko Iko Challenge"



TikTol Viral, March 15, 2021
-snip-
The Iko Iko "My Bestie" TikTok dance compilation videos end at around 7:35 in this video.

**** 
Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part pancocojams series about the 2017 Papua New Guinea/Soloman Island cover of the song "Iko Iko".

Part II showcases a TikTok challenge compilation of videos of two people performing a synchronized dance routine to a specific portion of Justin Wellington's version of the song "Iko Iko".

Part II also presents information about TikTok and includes some comments from the discussion thread for the video for Justin Wellington's song "Iko Iko (My Bestie".Those selected comments include some which refer to te power of TikTok to popularize songs as well as general comments about TicTok, comments about Justin Wilkerson's version of the song "Iko Iko", and comments about other versions of "Iko Iko".

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2021/05/justin-wellington-featuring-small-jam.html for Part I of this pancocojams series. Part I showcases a 2017 YouTube video of "Iko Iko" that was recorded by Justin Wellington featuring Small Jam and presents the lyrics to Justin Wellington's version of "Iko Iko" which he titled "Iko Iko (My Bestie)". 

Information about Justin Wellington is also included in that post.

The Addendum to Part I presents some information about the 1953 original recording of "Iko Iko". 

The content of this post is persented for historical, cultural, and entertainment purposes.  

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Sugar Boy Crawford, the composer of the song "Jock-O-Mo" which is now widely known as "Iko Iko". Thanks to Justin Wellington and Small Jam for this version of "Iko Iko". Thanks also to all those who are featured in this embedded video and all those who are quoted in this post. Thanks also to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT TIK TOK
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TikTok
"TikTok, known in China as Douyin (Chinese: ๆŠ–้Ÿณ; pinyin: Dว’uyฤซn), is a video-sharing social networking service owned by Chinese company ByteDance.[4] The social media platform is used to make a variety of short-form videos, from genres like dance, comedy, and education, that have a duration from 15 seconds to one minute (three minutes for some users).[5][6] TikTok is an international version of Douyin, which was originally released in the Chinese market in September 2016.[7] Later, TikTok was launched in 2017 for iOS and Android in most markets outside of mainland China; however, it only became available worldwide after merging with another Chinese social media service, Musical.ly, on 2 August 2018.

TikTok and Douyin have almost the same user interface but no access to each other's content. Their servers are each based in the market where the respective app is available.[8] The two products are similar, but features are not identical. Douyin includes an in-video search feature that can search by people's face for more videos of them and other features such as buying, booking hotels and making geo-tagged reviews.[9] Since its launch in 2016, TikTok/Douyin rapidly gained popularity in East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, the United States, Turkey, Russia, and other parts of the world.[10][11][12] As of October 2020, TikTok surpassed over 2 billion mobile downloads worldwide.[13][14][15][16]"...

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THE DISCUSSION THREAD OF THE YOUTUBE VIDEO ENTITLED 'JUSTIN WELLINGTON - "IKO IKO (MY BESTIE)" FEATURING SMALL JAM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TzwqnlYMqIg


Numbers are added for referencing purposes only.

All of these comments are from 2021

Note: I posted a number of comments in this video's discussion thread. Most of them are included in this compilation. 

1. Timolucas
"aah this is that tiktok song. But I see it has already been released in 2017. Do I have a gap in my memory or something?"
-snip-
Videos of the "Iko Iko" Tik Tok challenges in which two people do a synchronized dance routine to a particular clip of Justin Wilkerson's "Iko Iko (My Bestie" song were first published on YouTube in March 2021.

**
2. Musiclover!
"Hello and welcome to all of you who got here from Tiktok. This song is by Justin Wellington from Papua New Guinea ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ฌ and Small Jam from Solomon Islands ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ง ๐Ÿ’ž☺️ This is basically the vibe we have here in the Islands (Solomon Islands & the Pacific as a whole). If you want more check out DMP, Jaro Local, Dezine, Bibao, Jahboy, Young Davie, Trabol Sum and sooo many more from our talented Solomon Islands musicians ☺️๐Ÿ˜ One love ๐Ÿ’œ"

**
3. Affanaman H
"First I thought, it must be some Jamaican guy singing this song. This song is lit... #Tiktok brought me here ๐Ÿ˜…๐Ÿ˜…๐Ÿ˜…"

**
4. HUGO TORRES
"Never thought tik tok would be the place i heard new music for me but hear i am never woulda heard it otherwise"

**
Reply
5. ะฒั”eP bEฮญp
"Same, theres a lot of music i wouldn’t know about if it wasn’t for tiktok."

**
6. Regan Abrahams
"I thought this was a new song. TikTok to YouTube ๐Ÿ˜ณ๐Ÿคฃ"
-snip-
The video of Justin Wilkerson featuring Small Jam singing "Iko Iko (My Bestie)" was posted on YouTube March 21,  2017.

**
7. JUST MY THOUGHTS
"This song has been here for 4 years and I've just found it through tik tok"

**
8. Shuk H.
"This song.

3 years = 33k views

After 1 week on tik tok

300k views ๐Ÿ˜‚ ๐Ÿ˜‚ ๐Ÿ˜‚"

**
Reply
9. Melinda Bayn
"Thank means TikTok is doing its work!! xDDDDD You are rigth!"

**
Reply
10. andreacumare altareposteria
"Tik tok power  xD"

**
Reply
11. ella dizon
"and this day april 8 =1.4 ๐Ÿ‘€"

**
Reply
12. 8D Station
"@ella dizon  *1.4m"

**
13. tsanityassasin 369
"After a month 1.6 M views. Yes, it works!"
-snip-
As of the publishing date for this pancocojams post (at 7:18 PM ET), that video has a total of 5,731,627 views. 

**
14. King K
"I’m happy that this song finally got its recognition but sad that people found this on tiktok of all places ✋๐Ÿ˜‚"

**
15. Ranjana vs
"I heard this in Alvin and the chipmunks a few years back,but couldn't make the words out properly coz of the chipmunk voice.I searched and searched and couldnt find this song.Finally saw all those tiktok trends and got the song!!!"

**
16. Rebecca Tobena
"I love how everyone just discovered this song while us in PNG๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ฌ have been jamming to this song for a solid 5 years! Thanks TikTok❤️☝๐Ÿพ"

**
17. King DayDay
"Tiktok Is really out here blowing songs up."

**
Reply
18. Mr. Bepis Gaming
"No these songs are too good for tiktok"

**
Reply
19. Ivana Glb
"The only good thing about it"

**
20. Cristatus
"Say anything

But you have to agree tik tokers have a great taste in Music"

**
21. HighlySpiritual
"TikTok just going around resurrecting old music. Original song is 4 yrs old? Ok, here I am. ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿพ๐Ÿ’ƒ๐Ÿฟ๐Ÿ•บ๐Ÿ’ƒ๐Ÿฟ๐Ÿ•บ๐Ÿ’ƒ๐Ÿฟ๐Ÿ•บ"

**
22. Ing'utu Mututwa
"Just heard this on Tiktok right now and came here right away๐Ÿคญ"

**
23. Stacey Brihanna
"3 years less than 40k views

Then Tiktok was born...two weeks on Tiktok and now it's at 1 million views...talk about technology.."

** 
24. Yvonne Mutunga
"How can this song exist without being blown up? COME ON! LET'S BLOW THIS BABYYY UUUPPPPP!!๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š.... LET'S ALL HEAD TO TIKTOK AND MAKE A TREND USING THIS SONG!"

**
Reply
25. Notizlein
"๐Ÿ‘†๐Ÿ‘†๐Ÿ‘†๐Ÿ‘†๐Ÿ‘†๐Ÿ‘†๐Ÿ‘†

๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘

๐Ÿฅณ๐Ÿฅณ๐Ÿฅณ๐Ÿฅณ๐Ÿฅณ๐Ÿฅณ๐Ÿฅณ"

**
Reply
26. Cookie Cat
"Is a trend now"

** 
27. Humeur Positive
"I can’t believe this song is 4 years ago

 Now look where we are I can't imagine what tik tok can do just on few days"

**
Reply 
28. de P a G
"Sรณ eu sei que essa musica na realidade existe a 35 anos??? Quem canta Iko Iko original รฉ a Cyndi Lauper!!!! Album True Colors"
-snip-
Google translate from Portuguese to English: "Only I know that this song has actually existed for 35 years ??? Who sings the original Iko Iko is Cyndi Lauper !!!! True Colors Album"

**
Reply
29. Kenneth Loonan
"Yes I thought this song was new too"

**
Reply
30. alex
"Exactly, the song is by Cindy Lauper, and the first time I personally heard it was in the film K-9, with James Belushi, of which it is the ending theme.๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜‚"

**
Reply
31. Humeur Positive
"@Kenneth Loonan  same"

**
Reply
32. Robyn McLean
"@alex  The original was released in the 50s by Sugar Boy and his Cane Crushers, but it failed. It became popular when the Dixie Cups did a cover of it in the 60s."

**
33. Xiphy Phisternum
"TIKTOK can revive all of the dying songs/music thanks to it"

**
34. Connie Sanderson
"This song was a huge hit back in the 80s when I was a kid and I had it on a vinyl album."

**
35. anne-sophie decloquement
"This song exist since 30 years. It was in the film "Rain Man" with Tom Cruise (1985)"

**
Reply
36. Tallinn
"I think it exists since the 1950's. The title was Jock a Mo, and the lyrics were a bit different: "My grandma and your grandma were sitting by the fire, my grandma told your grandma: "I'm gonna set your flag on fire" ๐Ÿ˜"

**
Reply
37. Azizi Powell
"Also, the "Jock a Mo" song (which is most widely known as "Iko Iko") is a Mardi Gras Indian song from New Orleans, Louisiana. The "flags" in that song refer to the Mardi Gras Indian flags that are carried by each group's flag boy. Click https://www.mardigrasneworleans.com/history/mardi-gras-indians/ for information about the (mostly) African American groups that are known as the Mardi Gras Indians"

**
38. Isaac Mataele
"Tiktok ruined this"

**
39. Rashmi Luthra
"Some random Gold from Tik Tok"

**
40. Hen L
"I'm here because of tiktok ๐Ÿ˜†๐Ÿคฃ"

**
41. kelly wendel
"Heard this on tik tok and had to find the whole song. Like the song"

**
42. Dante King
"Tiktok isn't so bad. Thx to it i found this wonderful song."

**
43. TYIGO DAYS
"I knew about this song for long go but idk why I'm offended why it is only getting recognised now bc its soo good"

**
Reply
44. Chelsea Musyoki
"be glad it did not die without being recognised at all"

**
45. Ryan Syahriel
"i've been listen this song few years ago, but tiktok bring me here again."

**
46. Annette Renรฉe
"My fave tiktok song ever... just makes me feel so happy"

**
47. Ed Jaymark TV Travel
"I just heard this on tiktok so catchy i love it so much ๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿฅณ๐Ÿค—"

**
48. Bright Nahayo
"I LOVE YOU TIKTOK ๐Ÿ˜ญ๐Ÿ’‹"

**
49. D J
"I just came from TikTok. I loooooove it๐Ÿฅฐ❤ 2 sec of this sound and I'm smilling and dancing immediately! We NEED this kind of happy sound๐Ÿ˜ right now! This is pure joy, my personally vaccination!"

**
50. Kim Seokjin
"Thank you for introducing this to me Tiktok๐Ÿ’š"

**
51. Luci Fur
"If you have Caribbean family you heard this before tik tok ๐Ÿคฃ"

**
52. Rosaline Murugi
"So it was released 4 years ago? I just saw the challenges in tiktok ๐Ÿ‘Œ...

This is a real jam. Watching from Africa, Kenya, Nairobi"

**
53. Renata Relland
"I was driving to work when this song plays on the radio and I came here. Thank you from France"

** 
54. MysteriousGamer
"This song SLAPPPP

Thanks tik tok!!"

**
55. Jiu Kiu
"It feels so good to represent my island home on this one ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ง blue green and yellow..๐Ÿ‘Š✌️"

**
56. Gaelle Marie
"Cheers to your island from my island! Mauritius xx"

**
57. Josh_x_edits
"Here for the vibes๐ŸŒˆ๐Ÿ’ซ"

**
58. floreio
"Always loved this song as a kid in Barbados. Love your spin on it!"

**
59. Sandra Thulambo
"I'm after hearing this on TikTok and ran straight here. Lovely song"

**
60. topaz pink
"Glad tiktok made music from the south Pacific a hit now the whole world is watching this thankyou justin 4  creating awesome tunes๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ฏ"
-snip-
"FJ" = Fiji

**
61. Aquino Dalopez
"Pasific island the best,bravo melanesia..๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ฑ"

**
Reply
62. DABABYOFFICIAL CONVERTABLE
"Bula ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ฏ"
-snip-
From https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/fiji/articles/18-fijian-phrases-you-need-to-know-before-you-travel/ 18 Fijian Phrases You Need To Know Before You Travel, by Juliette Sivertsen, 9 January 2020

"Bula

Bula
is the most common word you’ll hear right across Fiji and it is used to greet people or say hello. When you say bula to someone, you are actually wishing them life.

 Ni sa bula/Ni sa bula vinaka

Ni sa bula is used as either a more formal greeting or as a welcome. This greeting extends on bula and wishes a person good health and happiness."

**
63. JNS CHILL
"Everyone who know that song before TikTok « manifest yourself »."

**
64. Sheila Cruz Suรกrez
"Por aqui los que vienen de tiktok!! ๐Ÿ™‹๐Ÿป‍♀"
-️snip-
Google translate from Spanish to English: "Around here those who come from tiktok!"

**
65. Megamix Central
"Thanks Tik Tok!"

**
66. Adhyt Ransun 92
"Fyp tiktok indonesia ๐Ÿคฉ๐Ÿคฉ๐Ÿคฉ"

**
67. Linah Maringa
"I came running  here from TikTok๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ˜€"
-snip-
"Za" is the county abbreviation for the nation of South Africa.

** 
68. Tyler fountain
"Lmao i see everybodies from tiktok but I'm here from madagascar 2 escape 2 africa on the xbox 360 ๐Ÿ˜‚"

**
69. Lamu Kidd
"Heard this from instagram and I came as fast as I could"

**
70. Helena Kapenombili Showa
"Heard the song on Tiktok then, I searched for it. It is really a fantastic song."

**
71. Tayorliz Couture
"Tiktok is really making old songs come back to life.... This song is number one on my playlist at the moment ☺️๐Ÿ’ฏ๐Ÿ’ฏ๐Ÿ’•"

**
72. A. C. T Sangma
" "Discovered  this song from TikTok "  The Comment that's pouring like rain down here๐Ÿ˜…๐Ÿ˜…๐Ÿ˜… Nvm this song's dope ...."

**
73. javed asad
"For the older people this song or the line of song is verry old more then 20 years it skip me the name of band who sing this for first time and I really lovet that time and all so now."

**
Reply
74. Trainwithmax
"1964...Dixie"

**
Reply
75. Teresa Hester
"Cyndi lauper had a version"

**
Reply
76. Azizi Powell
"@aved asad, the ORIGINAL song is "Jock-O-Mo" by Sugar Boy Crawford (Sugar Boy and the Cane Cutters) 1953. In 1964/1965The Dixie Cups had a big hit with their version of that song entitled "Iko Iko". This song is based on (African American, New Orleans, Louisiana) Mardi Gras Indian chants. There's been lots of covers of this song since then. This PNG/Soloman Island version is nicely done."

** 
77. missbroadcast1
"Thanks tiktok for This trend"

**
Reply
78. Jachimma
"Ditto"

** 
79. Melinda Bayn
"LOVE ITTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT OMG I FOUND THE ORIGINAL SONG HERE YOU MAKE MY DAY!"

**
Reply
80. Equinistra Horses
"This is the new version. This song is from 1965. And has been remade so many times.  Enjoy this version. ๐Ÿ˜‰"

**
Reply
81. Melinda Bayn
"@Equinistra Horses  I mean the original song from TikTok challenge lol Thank you!!! (I know the very original one too) xDDDDD my mistake I didn't explain myself better!"

**
82. Marina
"This song is not by Justin Wellington is a very old song and many artists sang different versions by the years. Search IKO IKO original on Google. Anyway this is a nice remake."

**
83. iana Mb
"Thank you tiktok for making me discover them"

**
84. Nicolรกs G.
"Everybody heard this on tiktok but I heard it on Instagram"

**
85. shabir Valli
"Talking about...where has this song been hiding?๐Ÿ‘€"

**
86. Luciana Gallegos
"
Tik tok brought me here!!! Really love the song"

**
87. Danah Gentile
"
Tik Tok just here making songs hit ๐Ÿ’ƒ๐Ÿพ๐Ÿ’ƒ๐Ÿพ๐Ÿ’ƒ๐Ÿพ"

**
88. Ryan Syahriel
"i've been listen this song few years ago, but tiktok bring me here again."

**
89. Helena Kapenombili Showa
"Heard the song on Tiktok then, I searched for it. It is really a fantastic song."

** 
90. Tamy love
"Bravo tik tok thanks tik tok merci tik tok gracias tik tok๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡น"
-snip-
HT= country abbreviation for Haiti.

**
91. OnMegamusic
"TIK TOK bless you xD"

** 
92. Shy Doorness
"I honestly think tiktok is cheesy but it made me discover beautiful songs such as this."

**
Reply
93. Leel David
"Right"

**
Reply
94. Ana Feliz
"I agree with you"

**
Reply
95. LC
"i avoid tiktok as much as i can but someone i watch on twitch danced to this an i instantly loved this song"

**  
Reply
96. PwngPwncess
"Listen to the original by Dixie cups. It’s so much better"

**
Reply 
97. Connie Sanderson
"@PwngPwncess  they sang the song but the original was by a different artist and he sued them"

**
98. Lauren Olson
"This song does the original good justice and that doesn't happen often"

 **
99. dayang aon
"What does iko mean?"

**
Reply
100. Sou Tikitik
"I go in English it’s the accent lol"

**
Reply
101. Azizi Powell
"@Sou Tikitik actually there are lots of theories and no definitive answers to the question "What does "Iko" mean in these songs?" There are also lots of theories and no definitive answers as to what "Jockomo fi na nay" means in these songs. Those words or phrases came from Mardi Gras Indian chants. Mardi Gras Indians are groups of [A]frican Americans from New Orleans, Louisiana.  Some words in their chants come from Creole, Cajun, French, traditional African languages,, and other languages, or were just made up a loooong time ago."

 **
102. Xiphy Phisternum
"TIKTOK can revive all of the dying songs/music thanks to it"

**
103. Farahdara Iqlima
"TikTok do the magic of this song! The problem is they just don't know this song before."

**
104. Arnaud
"TikTok is so powerful, it's scary"

**
Reply
105. Ayรงa Granger
"Yep"

** 
106. Joy Yombwe
"Heard this song on tiktok I was expecting crazy dances๐Ÿคท๐Ÿพ‍♀️๐Ÿคฃ๐Ÿคฃ but anyway I love this song ❣️๐Ÿ˜"

**
107. Ryan DSouza
"A song that created some positivity during the pandemic.! - May 2021."

**
108. life564578
"This is exactly the feeling I miss so much since Corona"

****
This concludes Part II of this two part pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Justin Wellington featuring Small Jam - "Iko Iko (My Bestie)" (A 2017 Papua New Guinea/ Soloman Island Version of "Iko Iko")


Justin Wellington, Mar 21, 2017
-snip-
Statistics as of May 13, 2021 at 4:09 PM ET
total # of views- 5,703,424
total # of likes - 96K
total # of dislikes -1.4K
total # of comments  - 1, 648

****
Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a two part pancocojams series about the 2017 Papua New Guinea/Soloman Island cover of the song "Iko Iko".

This post showcases a 2017 YouTube video of "Iko Iko" that was recorded by Justin Wellington featuring Small Jam and presents the lyrics to Justin Wellington's version of "Iko Iko" which he titled "Iko Iko (My Bestie)". 

Information about Justin Wellington is also included in this post.

The Addendum to this post presents some information about the 1953 original "Iko Iko" record.

Click 
https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2021/05/an-example-of-tiktok-popularizing-songs.html for Part II of this pancocojams series. Part II showcases a TikTok challenge compilation of videos of two people performing a synchronized dance routine to a specific portion of Justin Wellington's version of the song "Iko Iko".

Part II also presents information about TikTok and includes some comments from the discussion thread for the video for Justin Wellington's song "Iko Iko (My Bestie".Those selected comments include some which refer to te power of TikTok to popularize songs as well as general comments about TicTok, comments about Justin Wilkerson's version of the song "Iko Iko", and comments about other versions of "Iko Iko".

The content of this post is persented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.  

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Sugar Boy Crawford, the composer of the song "Jock-O-Mo" which is now widely known as "Iko Iko". Thanks to Justin Wellington and Small Jam for this version of "Iko Iko". Thanks also to all associated with this  embedded video and all those who are quoted in this post. 
-snip-
Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2021/02/some-information-about-mardi-gras.html for the 2021 pancocojams post entitled "
Some Information About The Mardi Gras Indian's Traditional Song "Iko Iko" (with lyrics for three versions of that song)".

****
INFORMATION ABOUT JUSTIN WELLINGTON
From https://www.last.fm/music/Justin+Wellington/+wiki
"Biography

In recent years his name and his music have taken the Pacific by storm. The Papua New Guinean born singer has emerged at the very forefront of the music scene throughout the islands and beyond. His charm and charisma have captured the hearts and minds of scores of adoring fans, and his beloved songs have become household favourites time and time again. Justin's unique style and sound is an irresistible blend of pop, reggae, R&B, dancehall and island music. His music is of course heavily stemmed from his diverse musical influences, but it is also undoubtedly a result of his life experiences in his home nation Papua New Guinea, and also from many years of living, travelling and performing abroad in North America, the South Pacific and South-East Asia."
-snip-
Notice that this review indicates that "Justin's unique style and sound is an irresistible blend of pop, reggae, R&B, dancehall and island music". The sound of Justin Wellington's "Iko Iko "My Bestie" song is much more Reggae than any other music genre. 

****
LYRICS - "IKO IKO (MY BESTIE)" 
(as sung by Justin Wellington featuring Small Jam)

Hahaha
Ayo big wave
Small Jam alongside J.W.

My bestie and your bestie
Sit down by the fire
Your bestie says she want party
So can we make these flames go higher?

Talkin' 'bout hey now (hey, now), hey, now (hey, now)
Iko iko an day
Jockomo feena a dan day
Jockomo feena nay 

Start my truck, let's all jump in
Here we go together
Nice cool breeze and big palm trees
I tell you, life don't get no better

Talkin' 'bout hey, now (hey, now), hey, now (hey, now)
Iko iko an day
Jockomo feena a dan day
Jockomo feena nay

A keia mamang gwele
Step on the dancing floor
Hips be winding, DJ rewinding
Take it to the island way
Keio, baby mama
Put on your dancing shoes
One drop it, drop it low, now, take it to the max now
Jammin' the Small Jam way
(Ja-Ja-) jammin' the Small Jam way

My bestie and your bestie
Dancing by the fire
Your bestie says she want party
So can we make these flames go higher?

Talkin' 'bout hey, now (hey, now), hey, now (hey, now)
Iko iko an day (ooh)
Jockomo feena a dan day
Jockomo feena nay 

Solomon girl straight up right hoochie mama
Make we party non stop in a island banda
Swing those hips and back it up to me ragga
A chance fi party, ladies do the Dougie Dougie

I'm jammin' island reggae reppin' blue, green and yellow
Me tappin' on me beat make ya slow wind for me, baby
Speakers pumpin', people jumpin'
We're jammin' the island way

Shoutout to the good-time crew
All across the islands
Grab your shoes, then we'll two by two
And now we're shinin' bright like diamonds

Talkin' 'bout hey, now (hey, now), hey, now (hey, now)
Iko iko an day (ooh)
Jockomo feena a dan day
Jockomo feena nay (yes)
(One drop it, drop it, low, now, take it to the max now)
(Jammin' the Small Jam way – wind it!)

Wind up, go down, wind up, go down
Twist your body backwards (we go, we go)
We go left, left, we go right, right
Turn it around and forward (wind and go down again)
Wind up, go down, wind up, go down
Twist your body backwards (twist it back)
We go left, left, we go right, right
Turn it around and forward

My bestie and your bestie
Dancing by the fire
Your bestie says she want party
So can we make these flames go higher?

Talkin' 'bout hey, now (hey, now), hey, now (hey, now)
Iko iko an day (ooh)
Jockomo feena a dan day
Jockomo feena nay
Jockomo feena nay
Jockomo feena nay
Jockomo feena nay


Source: 
https://www.letras.com/justin-wellington/iko-iko-feat-small-jam/
-snip-
Read the Addendum for information about the words "iko iko" and "jockoma feena nay".  

Here's explanations about some words in this song:

Words in the verse that begins with the line "Soloman girl straight up right hoochie mama":

Ragga music: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragga
"Raggamuffin music, usually abbreviated as ragga, is a subgenre of dancehall and reggae music. The instrumentals primarily consist of electronic music. Similar to hip hop, sampling often serves a prominent role in raggamuffin music"

banda = band

hoochie coochie- in this song that referent appears to be a complimentary referent for attractive women who like to party. However, here's some information from https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=hoochie%20mama [from Marion R, Oct. 21, 2007] about the meaning of "hoochie mama" in the United States"..."round the turn of the century in really gritty clubs and circuses (and for a long time after that) women who danced suggestively rolling their hips were "hootchie coutchie" dancers, or dancing the "hootchie coochie".

These women were not considered morally upright in the general public, so calling a woman a hootchie cooch was calling her a tramp, especially if dressed in a way that is meant to be provocative and showy. Hootchie mama is a variation on this term

Dougie Dougie - probably refers to "the Dougie" Hip Hop dance. Here's information about the Dougie from 
"The Dougie ...(DUG-ee) is a hip-hop dance generally performed by moving one's body in a shimmy style and passing a hand through or near the hair on one's own head.[1]

The dance originated in Dallas, Texas,[2][3] where it took its name from similar moves performed by 1980s rapper Doug E. Fresh.[1][4][5] The Dougie gained notoriety through rapper Lil' Wil, whose song "My Dougie", released in late 2007, became a local hit. Then, a person called C-Smoove in Southern California[4] taught the future members of Cali Swag District how to do the dance.[4][6] Cali Swag District recorded the song "Teach Me How to Dougie" and filmed the music video in Inglewood, California, during the summer of 2009.[4][5] Subsequently, the video along with the dance became popular on YouTube.[4]"...

**
The line about the blue, green, and yellow flag refers to The Solomon Island. Here's information about The Soloman Islands from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solomon_Islands

"The Solomon Islands is a sovereign state[8][9] consisting of six major islands and over 900 smaller islands in Oceania, to the east of Papua New Guinea and northwest of Vanuatu. It has a land area of 28,400 square kilometres (11,000 sq mi), and a population of 652,858.[10]”…

****
ADDENDUM
From 
https://www.americanbluesscene.com/iko-iko-jock-a-mo/
Mardi Gras: A Brief History of "Iko! Iko! Jock-a-mo Fee No Nay"
Matt Marshall February 17, 2012
"Though the song has been featured in dozens of movies, it's lyrics continue to be somewhat of a mystery. The song, like so many traditional folk songs, has a long and storied history, winding from rushed phonetic translation in New Orleans to a misheard title in Chess Records and far beyond and before.

In honor of Mardi Gras, we’re bringing you another entry in American Blues Scene’s exclusive “Brief History of a Song” series.

On Tuesday, the Mardi Gras indians, who spent thousands of dollars and millions of beads constructing wildly elaborate suits, will march through the streets of New Orleans in a complex hierarchy of Kings and Spy Boys and wild men, chanting exotic dirges and dancing in grandiose fashion. Possibly the one phrase that has become deeply inseparable from the history and popular conception of the Indians, Mardi Gras, and, occasionally, New Orleans is “Iko! Iko! Jock O Mo Fee No Nay.” Though the song has been featured in dozens of movies ranging from Skeleton Key and Rain Man to Hangover, what the lyrics mean continue to be somewhat of a mystery. The song, like so many traditional folk songs, has a long and storied history, winding from rushed phonetic translation in New Orleans to a misheard title in Chess Records and far beyond, (and before).

James “Sugar Boy” Crawford is a lifetime New Orleans resident. Sugar Boy and his band played around New Orleans until, by chance, Leonard Chess of the famous blues label Chess Records, heard the band. Chess released a single under the band name Sugar Boy and his Cane Cutters which sold well regionally, and gave Crawford another chance to shine. While watching Mardi Gras indians parade and dance in the early 1950s, he hurriedly wrote down a phonetic interpretation of the indian’s chants, put the chants to music, and in 1953, created one of the most popular, longest lasting Mardi Gras, or “Carnival,” as it’s often called, songs in existence. The song name was called “Chock-a-mo,” though when Crawford told Chess the title over the phone, he misheard it and upon it’s release, Crawford discovered the title was instead called “Jock-a-mo.”

“Iko! Iko! Jock-a-mo Fee No Nay” is a phrase that will, for many, instantly bring to mind the iconic 1965 number by The Dixie Cups. The pop group was in the studio recording, and during some downtime in between takes, they played an impromptu, loose jam of “Jock-A-Mo” that they had remembered from their hometown — even offhandedly using ash trays as drums. What they didn’t know was that producers Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller were recording the entire affair. The song became a huge hit, the Dixie Cups’ last successful commercial one, and has been a staple ever since.

Crawford received no royalties from the Dixie Cups’ version, despite it being a clearly cut-and-dried cover of his original work. After an extensive legal battle with RedBird Records, Crawford agreed to receive a percentage of royalties for public performances, which means he is supposed to receive a fee for when the song is played on the radio, live, etc. and does not receive any royalties from sales of the track itself.

As to where the oft-repeated, oft-variant phrase comes from,  Crawford had this to say in Offbeat Magazine’s 2009 interview with him:

It came from two Indian chants that I put music to. “Iko Iko” was like a victory chant that the Indians would shout. “Jock-A-Mo” was a chant that was called when the Indians went into battle. I just put them together and made a song out of them"….

[comment]
Lee Pons, February 19, 2012
"Great Article I enjoyed it very much! It’s been my understanding from my time in New Orleans and seeing Mardi Gras Indian practices. That “IKO IKO” was a Chant of warning to other tribes. In the past the The Indians where very violent and Fat Tuesday used to be a time to “Settle Scores” as any “problems” had to be “Over and Done” by Ash Wensday, or forgotten of, and if two tribes should happen to meet while “Masking” on Mardi Gras Day, a Shooting and somebody getting Killed where pretty much “Gar-Ron-Tee’d”. One of the Lyrics to this song goes “See my King all Dress in Red, IKO IKO Ae Ay, Bet you 5 Dollars, He will Shoot You Dead, IKO IKO Ae Ay”. It was thought the efforts of Big Chief Allison “Tootie” Montana. that the Fight between the tribes finally stop and instead of Killing eack other when two Tribes do meet on the street it now becomes Performance Art of the Highest order as now the members square off into a sort of Dance off, and show respect to the others King as the Two Kings stand back in a showoff of “Who’s Prettiest!”.

All that being said the Chant of IKO, IKO” was meant as a warning to any other tribe that might be in the area, Basically it was telling any other Tribe “We’re Coming, Get the HELL Out of the WAY!” "

****
This concludes Part I of this two part pancocojams series.

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Wednesday, May 12, 2021

2001 Documentary Film About Black Americans Who Have Native American Ancestry (with selected comments)


TheeSymphony'sCulture Channel, May 21, 2020

Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research. This documentary-film "Black Indians: An American Story" is not for any personal financial profit or gain to TheeSymphony'sCulture Channel, but instead only for educational purposes and cultural research. "Black Indians: An American Story" brings to light a forgotten part of America's past - the cultural and racial fusion of Native and African Americans. Narrated by James Earl Jones, produced and directed the awarding winning Native American production company, Rich-Heape Films, this presentation explores what brought the two groups together, what drove them apart, and the challenges that they face today. From the Atlantic Seaboard to the Western Plains, family memories and historical highlights reveal the indelible mark of this unique ancestry, and its continuing influence throughout the generations. Narrated by James Earl Jones Directed by, Chip Richie RICH HEAPE FILMS, INC. Note: This documentary-film (Black Indians: An American Story) was originally produced in 2001 ... later released on dvd in 2004.,,, **** Edited by Azizi Powell This pancocojams post provides some information about the Native American produced 2001 documentary film "Black Indians: An American Story". A YouTube video of that complete film is embedded in this post along with selected comments from the discussion thread of that video. The content of this post is presented for historical, socio-cultural, and educational purposes. All copyrights remain with their owners. Thanks to Rich-Heape Films for producing this documentary film, thanks to African American actor James Earl Jones for narrating this film, and thanks to all those who were associated with that film. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this pancocojams post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS YOUTUBE VIDEO'S DISCUSSION THREAD

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UlL94sw_C8Q&ab_channel=LoveBeadsandFeathersLoveBeadsandFeathers

(with numbers added for referencing purposes only) 

1.WE WATCHIN TV, 2020
"@5:00 of this video the man said Christopher Columbus invaded America and he was put out class sounds very familiar. The same thing happened to me in high school. Black kids have been "psychologically abused" by the American education system for along time in this country."

**
2. 
M J, 2020
"What a wonderful documentary.   I was not aware at all about most of this."

**
Reply
3. Arlene Muhammad, 2021
"There's a book xalled "Black Indians" by William Loren Katz."

**
4. jashane stone, 2020
"My grandmother was of Siksikaitsitapi or Blackfoot Confederacy and people always confuse me for latino or mixed.

Didn't help that some my cousins, tias aka titi's and tios were Puerto Ricans in The Bronx. Lml ๐Ÿ’ช๐Ÿพ๐Ÿ’ฏ"

**
5. Christopher Robertson, 2020
"I am a Black and White “Indian” #838 of the Narragansett tribe.  My card has expired, but I haven’t.  After I get vaccinated I will update."

**
6. 
Teressa Cooks, 2020
"I grew up in the 70's when two side-braids with a headband were in style.  One day a teacher told me, "You look like an Indian (Native American) Princess"!  Years later in my 20's my mother told me my Grandfather had died and she was going to the VA to view the body.  It was then that she told me my Grandfather was Choctaw!  Well, THAT explained a lot...such as our hair texture, which seemed at odds with our dark (very dark) skin.  Kids at school would ask if I were "mixed" because of my hair.  Naturally, I said I was not. Imagine my shock when I found out I was๐Ÿ˜ฎ!  Why didn't my mother ever tell me?  Even when I mention the remark from my teacher she said nothing.  I don't understand why parents keep so much from their kids.  So many skeletons in people's closets regarding their children's birth, lineage, and paternity. ๐Ÿ˜”"

**
7. 
Reve NOrthrup, 2020
"My grandma told me that is how our mixture happened because the slaves ran away to the Natives. Choctaw proud"

**
8. Gerry Houska, 2020
"As a parent of biracial Australians, I found your documentary most interesting and informative.

Racism is so stupid, as well as evil."

**
9. 
Steph Allan, 2020
"I was partially raised by the Best Auntie Ever..I’m Indigenous Native American and she had the same mother my mom had.  Her father was black but she definitely leaned toward our Indigenous side and she carried on the oral history of the three Tribes of  my grandmother who was documented 3/4 blood degree.  She researched every document that related to our family.   I sincerely love and miss my beautiful Aunt as she passed last year.   I am happy to say I have the prettiest and smart niece who also has a black father and  I’m going to ensure she’s aware of her Indigenous side."

**
10. 
Teresa, 2020
"I am so glad that I watched this. I grew up in the North East during the early 60s/70s, and my father was Mexican/Blackfoot Indian. My mom was half Choctaw&black/Polish&German. Can anyone say mutt? I had long dark hair and copper colored skin. People would always say "What are you? What are you?" like I was some sort of circus freak. I wasn't black enough for the blacks or white enough for the whites etc When I was younger this used to really upset me. Now, I am very proud of being unique and I embrace every part the entire racial blend that I am! This show made me glad that it affirmed the positivity of accepting every part of yourself. You don't have to be what society wants you to be. BE YOURSELF!!"

**
11. Cynthia Richter, 2020
"Wouldn't it be wonderful if we all thought of everyone as human beings!"

**
Reply
12. Girma Mogus, 2020
"But that will make us human!!"

**
Reply
13. derrell920, 2020
"Wouldn’t it be wonderful if racism and white supremacy didn’t contribute to the issues of the world"

**
Reply
14, Evanique, 2020
"I think it would be great if everyone could see that we are all spiritual beings before anything else."

**
Reply
15. Samuel Reed, 2020
"What part of this movie says anything differently?"

**
Reply
16. Rae Min-Laan McNeil, 2020
"White people made up the races.....tell them to treat others like human beings."

**
Reply
17. Miya Adams, 2020
"White people don’t like that. They need to feel superior."

**
Reply
18. Karen Nicholls, 2020
"Brilliantly put. Unfortunately, human nature for political and societal reasons prefers labelling human"

**
19. drmayesmt, 2020
"It was only when the mixture was with African ancestry. There didn't seem to be the same narrative for the Native and White mix."

**
20. 
Oracle Of The Ether, 2020
"So much of this is my story growing up saying I'm Indian & told by other's I was African, this is heartbreaking"

**
21. Goldie Media, 2020
"Here in 2020, love it, I'm mixed from Cape Town. Please Google to learn about my mix too it's pretty crazy. Google"Cape Coloured" mixed group  from Cape Town. The Cape of Goodhope. The racial drama here is the same as in America"

**
22. Fannie M, 2020
"History wasn't written correctly. I'm glad that I was able to be told by fore parents of my dark skin Indian/Irish heritage. You look at me and you would say African American. America' History not all true as heritage is concerned."

**
23. 
Brandy Quick, 2020
"I'm proud to say a decendant of black Cherokee/ Seminole indian tribe and decendent of the trans Atlantic slave trade."

**
24. Kudjoe Adkins-Battle, 2020
"38:00 that is not the Afrocentric perspective."
-snip-
This comment refers to the person interviewed indicating that afrocentric Black Americans don't recognize the mixed racial ancestry of Black Americans and don't consider that mixed racial ancestry with the same level of respect that they hold Black African ancestry.

As an African American who considers myself to be afrocentric I agree with Kudjoe Adkins-Battle that that commenter doesn't reflect what Afrocentric perspective means.

Here's a definition of  "afrocentricity" that I agree with from https://www.britannica.com/event/Afrocentrism 
"whose mainly African American adherents regard themselves and all other Blacks as syncretic Africans and believe that their worldview should positively reflect traditional African values. The terms Afrocentrism, Afrocology, and Afrocentricity were coined in the 1980s by the African American scholar and activist Molefi Asante"
-snip-
Here's a definition of "syncretic" from https://www.thefreedictionary.com/syncretic
"1. Reconciliation or fusion of differing systems of belief, as in philosophy or religion, especially when success is partial or the result is heterogeneous.

2. Linguistics The merging of two or more originally different inflectional forms."

**
25. 
Denis jeliฤiฤ‡, 2020
"Some black people were already in America before columbus"

**
26. Arlene Muhammad, 2020
"  "It's hard to get rid of ones self hate in the internalized racism that we have."  Here in America!"

**
27. 
LakeErieOH, 2020
"what i never hear on these shows is the fact that Native Americans hiding on plantations from the Trail of Tears were listed on the slave census lists as "Mulatoo Fugative from the State"; my gr-gr-gr-grandfather."

**
28. vulcan1429, 2020
"Black people hate being Black....one drop of ANYTHING else and they call themselves that....what ever it is!!"

**
29. Angel Sanders, 2021
"I hate when people try to tell you what you are based on how you look. It’s your culture and life experience thanksgiving makes you what you are much more than appearance. I spent from experience.

Right. Most people don’t think Indians still exist. I offered to show a little girl my tribal card and she seriously thought I was joking."

**
Reply
30. Rae Min-Laan McNeil, 2021
"❤❤❤"

**
31. 
Funkdafied 89, 2021 
"What’s upsetting is how a lot of Black Natives are STILL fighting to be recognized and accepted on a lot of Reservations such as the Choctaw, Cherokee, and Chickasaw to name a select few, but these reservations act like we’re not Indian enough and want us PROVE ourselves, yet they’ll accept a Blue eyed blonde or brunette white individual who claim to have a “Cherokee grandmother” with open arms!!! The hypocrisy is still real in 2020!๐Ÿ™„"

 **
32.
SuperNova, 2021
"African Americans just don’t want to be what they are .. just plain ole African American .. everybody and they momma says “my grandmother was full blooded Cherokee ... meanwhile they look like they come from Sudan.. wtf ... just stop."

**
33. 
 anibal almodovar, 2021
"This is part of our American history which should be taught in schools today."

**
34. Lena LawKoroi, 2021
"Native Fijian myself but I found this absolutely extraordinary..knew nothing about this and commend the Producers for coming up with this vital audio-visual historical print for the country..Thankyou, thoroughly interesting and educational"

**
35. Penny Bennett, 2021
"My grandmother was a black indian from Canada, cree indian, she moved to la. Married a white man, my mother looked more white than Indian"

**
36. SuperNova, 2021
"That jermaine Jackson looking guy IS NOT Light skinned. Why does he keep saying that l.. who the hell mistook him for light skin .. I know a lot of brown abs dark skin people who swear up and down they are light... NO YOU ARE NOT!!! Your delusional."

**
37. Seeking Pathways, 2021
"the dude in the purple suit reminds of chappelle's character bigsby...because he look like a very  brown indian, nothing is light about him. he keeps saying im so light, okay, whatever."

**
38. Jiji Solomon, 2021
"I don't know why this one man keeps saying that he is light skinned. I wonder does he know there are 100% DNA Africans south of the Sahara that are lighter than he is and Native Americans in Peru who are darker than he is. SMH.

**
Reply
39. Karen HL, 2021
"With all due respect, it is sad how easily we melinated people of various origins can dismiss another person's actual life experience based on our own perceptions. 

I don't know him.  Growing up, he may very well have been the light skinned one, with the straight hair, with the thin nose, etc. in his family or area or school and most importantly may have been treated like an anomaly because of it.   If that was HIS life experience and he was brave enough to share it, who are we to judge whether he is light enough to call himself light skinned.  Everything is relative.

I thank them all for their contributions to that documentary.   Every minute of it was valuable information that I never knew."

**
40. Ave Dee, 2021
"Ask about the New Orleans Indians."

**
41. Chris Lupe, 2021
"I wish people would stop calling native Americans indians. Indians come from India!"

**
42. Lexine Jackson, 2021
"I was told by a black woman the only races that matter are blacks and whites I was explaining to her my Native heritage. She said no one will ever accept you and she laughed in my face. So sad that blacks are so ignorant towards Native Americans that women was displaying racism which was taught by the white race. I am too light to be black and too exotic  to be white this world is so sadistic and sad."

**
43. James Earl Cash, 2021
"Many of those so called 'Africans' were already in the Americas

before Columbus and other Europeans arrived according to the

french Explorer Giovanni Da Verrazano in his writings describing

some of the people he encountered as being 'not unlike Ethiopians'.

 http://www.columbia.edu/~lmg21/ash3002y/earlyac99/documents/verrazan.htm

Not unlike means like thus the people he encountered looked like

what we would call 'Africans' today.  This narrative fails to point out

that just about all the continents on the planet were and are inhabited

by so called black people including places such as India and China. 

Many of the so called 'African Americans' more so resemble people

from the Polynesian Islands such as Papua New Guinea than they

do people from Africa.  Those who are mixed with so called whites

do not look like Africans from Africa who are mixed with so called

whites even if it's generational.  This does not take away from what

is being said in this video regarding indigenous peoples blending in

with those so called Africans that were brought to the Americas

but it fails to point out that those slaves were not only mixed with

straight haired so called Indians but were also mixed up with so

called Black Aboriginals.  Many so called Indians and Black

American Aboriginals were shipped out to other countries as well

and there is little to no records as to where those people were

shipped to?  what happened to them, how many of them died? 

How many of them lived and blended in with the people who's lands

they were brought to?  The Issue of American slavery is one sided

and not well rounded but that is done for a political reason which is

what this video is about and that is about American racial politics

it's not about presenting the full picture its about manipulating

emotions and perceptions as a means of keeping people divided

for a particular political goal that benefits the manipulators.

**
44. 
Taylor Taylor, 2021
"You can be a dark skinned person with a different texture of hair and different facial features and also not fit in with African Americans or whites. It’s frustrating for us too."

**
45. SuperNova, 2021
"African Americans just don’t want to be what they are .. just plain ole African American .. everybody and they momma says “my grandmother was full blooded Cherokee ... meanwhile they look like they come from Sudan.. wtf ... just stop."

**
46. LakeErieOH, 2021
"at 25:11, yes, the language was not handed down, nor interpreted past my gr-grandmother, but the history of  speaking in Choctaw was handed down; at least i know my language was heard spoken by my ancestors and older relatives.  my gr-uncle would ask our grandfather (to him, grandfather, to me, gr-gr grandfather) what he said when talking to the other Choctaws there, and he'd be told to go and play; "he would talk that talk and i couldn't understand him.  he'd talk it to his Choctaw friends that were there.  i'd ask him, grandad, what did you say? he'd tell me to go along and play".  others revealed to me how english was his 2nd language.  older cousins would lovingly poke fun at his accent, he could barely say english words right."

**
47. LakeErieOH, 2021
"at 28:30 yes, the effort to erase the people already here was for real, nothing light, and at 26:00-28:00 yes, i have helped restore what was almost lost, my Choctaw heritage.  family tree with slave census tracts, census tracts, photos, mathcing testimony/family-friends-history, dna strands on the ancestry website, and i practice my Choctaw language"

****
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Monday, May 10, 2021

"I Got Shoes" sung in the Dr. Watts (long meter) style by Nazareth Missionary Baptist Church (South Carolina)


Hymn Choir Channel, Jul 24, 2014

Recorded by KB in March 2001 at Hymn Choir Anniversary of Mt Do-Well Missionary Baptist Church, McConnells, SC. Performing Choir is Hymn Choir from Nazareth Missionary Baptist Church, Rock Hill, SC **** Edited by Azizi Powell This pancocojams post provides information about long meter ("Dr. Watts hymns") and showcases Nazareth Missionary Baptist Church, Rock Hill, South Carolina singing "I Got Shoes".
The lyrics for this version of "I Got Shoes" is included in this song along with some other comments from the discussion thread of this embedded video.
The content of this post is presented for religious, cultural, and aesthetic purposes. All copyrights remain with their owners.
Thanks to all those who keep the tradition of Dr. Watts hymn singing alive. Thanks also to pancocojams visitor Joanne Karn whose e-mail inspired me to publish this post. A reprint of that email is given in the comment section of this post (with the prior permission of that email's writer.)  -snip- Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/10/i-got-shoes-walk-all-over-gods-heaven.html for the Oct. 2013 pancocojams post "I Got Shoes (Walk All Over God's Heaven) lyrics, examples, comments". 
****
ARTICLE EXCERPT ABOUT DR. WATTS SINGING From https://arts.ms.gov/folklife/artist.php?dirname=watts_doctor Dr. Watts Singers
Worship Music, Meridian, Red Clay Hills
Mississippi Arts Commission, 2013 "Every Wednesday evening, the members of St. John Missionary Baptist Church in Meridian begin their prayer meeting with a long-standing musical tradition. The group sings a series of long meter or “Dr. Watts” hymns. The hymns are sung in a slow, ornamental style, with each line being “lined out” (chanted in a quick, rhythmic manner) by one of the singers before it is sung together by the congregation. The singing goes on for approximately thirty minutes until the preacher begins with the evening lesson.

The tradition gets its name from Isaac Watts, an early 19th century English composer, although the texts the singers use come from a variety of hymnbooks and other sources, not just from those written by Watts. These books provide only the texts for the hymns, they do not include musical notation. The tunes used by the singers have been passed down from generation to generation within the African-American community. Because of this, each church that sings the hymns develops their own distinct way of singing them. Mary Perry, a member of St. John, related that when visiting another church, Dr. Watts singers have to listen carefully to how the hymns are “lined out,” since each church does it in a slightly different manner.

While singing Dr. Watts hymns was a crucial part of services in many African-American churches throughout the south in the past, newer forms of church music, like gospel, gradually replaced it during the 20th century. The congregation of St. John has been attentive to these changes and utilizes the newer styles of music in its worship. However, they also remain committed to continuing to sing the Dr. Watts hymns in their services and to pass on the tradition to younger members of the congregation."...

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THE DISCUSSION THREAD OF THIS EMBEDDED VIDEO
(with numbers added for referencing purposes only)

1. shedrick brown, 2014
"This is what i was raised up on and iam only 39yrs old and I love it........    I pray we can bring this kind of singing back to the lowcountry it really makes a service for me!!!    Keep on singing for Jesus saints of God.."

**
2. Jerrell Glover, 2014
"Oh yes sir now that what you call singing hymns I love it"

**
lisa wright, 2014
"
where are these churches located and when is the next hymn choir anniversary I want to be there"

**
Reply
Mrs. Oluyede, 2014
"Almost any Baptist church in the Carolina's still pretty much sing hymn. I'm in Charlotte NC and there are plenty...."

**
TheBmont, 2014
"Wonderful!  I always enjoyed to go to church in NC & SC to hear this! Oh yes indeed!"

**
Jassey Jeff, 2015
"
Sounds like  Buncombe Baptist Church  in Tyro nc  Amazing"

**
Mz. Punkin, 2015
"yes Lord, sang that old hymn!!!"
-snip-
The word "sang" in this comment  is a present tense African American Vernacular English word that means "to sing very well, especially to sing soulfully very well."

**
robert scott, 2015
"The last lady leading was rocking!!! She tore it up!"

**
Reply
Yvonne Russ Bell, 2015
"Yes, she did.    I found myself going just that part, even though it's all perfectly wonderful!"

**
Reply
Natisha Carn, 2019
"My grandmother...Mrs. Willie Francis Boger...a singing soul!"

**
K J, 2016
"Good god from Zion!! I'm in Miami and have never seen this!. I've got to make my way to the carolinas, now I can feel the togetherness in the people through the holy spirit"

**
Reply
The Wilder Experience, 2016
"I remember growing up in Miami and hearing songs like this when greater new bethal baptist church use to be in the bottom back in the 70's"

**
Reply
Patricia Alston, 2019
"We do the same type of singing in Baltimore Maryland and its call vocal and you might hear a drum beat every now and then."

**
Reply
Cinderyella Thomas, 2019
"Morning Star Baptist is my home church in Miami but now I'm in SC and I'm definetly looking to visit this church!"

**
NativeLeo3, 2016
"
What are the words they are singing to this song?"

**
Reply
Stephen Dixon, 2016
"The choir leader, which is my cousin is saying "I got shoes and you got shoes all of God's children got shoes when I get to heaven I'm going to try on my shoes and shout all over God's heaven. Then they go on to say the same about a robe and a crown."

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Reply
resah9, 2016
"I got shoes, you got shoes, all God's children got shoes. When I get to heaven, gonna put on my shoes, gonna shout all over God's heaven.

I got a robe... I got a mother... I got a savior... I got a song...." ** Lorenzo Moore, 2017 "Do they meet up just to sing songs?" ** Reply Smoota Toota, 2019 "On This Day It Was A Hymn Choir Anniversary" ** Chad Hudson, 2021 "It definitely is a Piedmont African American type song.

South Carolina African Americans in particular always tend to start songs with the upbeat, when most other places use the downbeat. Funny how the downbeat is “African American” but use of the upbeat is “African” " -snip- "Piedmont" here may refer to Piedmont, South Carolina which is located in the Northwest South Carolina near North Carolina border, 75 miles southwest of Charlotte, NC" https://www.bestplaces.net/city/south-carolina/piedmont
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