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Thursday, November 26, 2020

TURKEY DANCE 🦃Thanksgiving Exercise For Kids (Video, lyrics, & movement descriptions)



GO WITH YOYO - Fitness Fun For Kids, Nov. 14, 2019
-snip-
After this exercise video, there's a short clip of children responding to the statement and question "Turkey time is Thanksgiving time. So what are you thankful for?" 

****
Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases a YouTube video of Go With YOYO's "Turkey Dance: Thanksgiving Exercise For Kids". 

The lyrics and movement descriptions for this song are included in this post.

 The content of this post is presented for entertainment purposes.

 All copy rights remain with their owners.

 Thanks to Go With YOYO and all those associated with this song and this video.

 Happy Thanksgiving!

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LYRICS WITH ACCOMPANYING MOVEMENTS
children's voices - Go With YOYO!

YOYO- Hey, what's up friends.
My name is YOYO
And today we're doin a turkey dance
It's called "T is for turkey".

So take your arms out really big [Stand with your feet slightly apart and stretch your arms out]
Every time I say "Make a T" you're gonna do this.

Alright, every time I say "Gobble" you're gonna shake your feathers like this and you're gonna wiggle around [bend your knees a little bit and still looking forward, bob up and down to the beat while shaking your hands back and forth near your waist]

And when I say "Wattle"- That's that red thing in front of a turkey- you're gonna do this with your hands
[Stand with your feet slightly apart and put your left arm up right underneath your mouth and flap your hand up and down to the beat and then do the same thing with your right arm and your right hand]

Alright! Let's do it!

T
[jump up after saying T and performing the movement for T]

T

T

T
  
Alright, now
Gobble

Wattle

Gobble

Wattle

Do it again!

Gobble

Wattle

Gobble

Wattle

Gobble

Wattle

Gobble

Wattle

Gobble

Wattle

Alright, you ready?

T

T

T

T

Gobble

Wattle

Gobble

Wattle

T

T

T

T

Do it again!

Gobble

Wattle

Gobble

Wattle

T

T

TTT, Woo!

****
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Wednesday, November 25, 2020

"Walk, Chalk, Chicken With His Head Pecked Off" (old song & old time fiddle tune video, information, lyrics, & speculative meaning)



Chuck Levy, January 1, 2013

Joe Bone (Greg Allen, Bob Murphy, and Caitlin Murphy) at the Florida Masters concert at the Stephen Foster Old-Time Music Weekend, September, 2012.  Walk Chalk Chicken is a Melvin Wine tune.
-snip-
Although I'm showcasing a video of this old time fiddle tune, this post focuses on information about this song and its lyrics instead of the song's tune.

This is one of  several YouTube videos of the old time fiddle tune "Walk Chalk Chicken".

I chose to highlight this particular video because I live within walking distance (ten blocks) from the Stephen Foster Memorial Home (where that composer was born and lived) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

****
Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents information about and lyrics for the old time song and fiddle tune "Walk Chalk Chicken With His Head Pecked Off". That song is also known as "Walk Talk Chicken With His Head Pecked Off", "Walk Chalk Chicken With A Necktie On" and "Walk Chalk Chicken".

This post also includes my guess about the meaning of the "Walk, Chalk Chicken With His Head Pecked Off" song. 

The content of this post is presented for historical and socio-cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the unknown composer/s of this song. Thanks also to (African American) Thomas W. Talley for his collecting this song and including it in his now classic 1922 book Negro Folk Rhymes: Wise And Other Wise. Thanks to (White American) Melvin Wine for performing this fiddle tune and sharing it with others. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of the YouTube video whose link is provided. 

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE SONG "WALK CHALK [or WALK TALK] CHICKEN WITH YOUR HEAD PECKED OFF"

[Numbers and alphabetical order added for referencing purposes only] 

Excerpt #1
From https://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Walk_Chalk_Chicken
"Traditional tune archive

WALK, CHALK CHICKEN. AKA - "Walk Chalk Chicken with a Necktie On." Old-Time, Reel. A cross-tuned (AEae) piece related to the “Farewell to Whiskey (1)/Young America/Ladies Triumph (1)” family of tunes, from the playing of Coppen, West Virginia, fiddler Melvin Wine. He learned the tune from his father, who was the only person he ever heard play it. Comparisons with a similarly-titled rhyme from early 20th century collector Thomas Talley's 1922 collection (Negro Folk Rhymes: Wise and Otherwise) called "Walk, Talk, Chicken with Your Head Pecked," or with the early minstrel song "Ginger Blue" (which uses the words "walk, talk"), are speculative, and no direct connection has been established."...

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Excerpt #2
From https://www.banjohangout.org/archive/315826
A) 
Tobus - Posted - 03/04/2016
"As my first TOTW contribution, I'd like to post one of my favorite tunes, Walk Chalk Chicken.  Also known as Walk Chalk Chicken With a Necktie On.

Many of you probably already know this tune, but I think it's time to get it official in the TOTW list.

The source recording seems to be the late great West Virginia fiddler Melvin Wine (1909-2003).  He claimed to have learned it from his father, but never heard anyone else play it.  This tune appears in the Milliner-Koken Collection of American Fiddle tunes, and was on Melvin Wine's 1976 album Cold Frosty Morning.

The title of the tune, and thus its origin, seems to be a regular source of debate.  The name is thought by some to be a reference to the Chalk Line Walk or Cake Walk, which has a storied history in the antebellum South (allegedly spreading from Florida from about 1850).  Apologies for the sensitivity of the subject, but this was a dance performed by slaves to parody the high-society mannerisms of their masters, and ended up being the subject of later minstrel shows as a reverse parody.  However, there has been no actual documented connection between the Chalk Line Walk and this tune.  Other suggested origins include folk poems and more minstrel show material.

Claims of these connections tend to be based on the name of the tune alone, and it is certainly understandable.  The title is so unique, it would be difficult to imagine any other origin unrelated to these possibilities.  Any additional information or input would be appreciated, if anyone has it.  I wonder if more background could be gleaned from the book on Melvin's life?

So, on to the tune...”
-snip-
Tobus' comment continues with a description of how this tune is played and information about some of the recordings of this tune. Including YouTube videos.

Most of the responses to that comment also focus on how it is played as well as recordings of this tune, including YouTube videos. However, here are two  comments from that discussion thread that focus on the source for the tune and focus on the song's lyrics:

**
B) BrendanD - Posted - 03/04/2016
…"The tune had always seemed oddly familiar to me from the time I first learned it, and at some point I realized that it's a version of the Irish tune "Farewell to Whiskey"! I'd love to know the path it took to get from Ireland to Braxton County, WV, and into the Wine family's repertoire. I have not heard it from any other source than Melvin.”….

**
C) JanetB - Posted - 03/06/2016
"Welcome to TOTW, Tobus!  Your choice of tunes is wonderful, as is your presentation.  I'm always happy to learn more from the fiddling of Melvin Wine.   In the book Fiddling Way Out Yonder, the Life and Music of Melvin Wine by Drew Beisswenger there is almost a page of information on the tune, as well as a transcription of his fiddling.  It discusses the musicality of Walk Chalk Chicken, confirms that he learned it from his father, and compares it to related tunes.  Here's a quote from the book:  "The term 'walk chalk' is found in the song 'Ginger Blue,' described by White (ANFS, p. 380-81) as a pre-minstrel song, but the song's connection to 'Walk Chalk Chicken' is unclear."
-snip-
Here's an excerpt about the chalk line that I shared in 2005 on this Mudcat folk music forum's discussion thread: https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=80680  "Folklore: The Cake-Walk & Other Plantation Dances"
"Also, with regard to the chalk line, here's a quote that is excerpted from Lynne Fauley Emery's book "Black Dance From 1619 to Today" { Princeton, New Jersey, Princeton Books,1988, p.92}

"Entertainer Tom Fletcher heard stories about the Cake-Walk from his grandfather, who had won many prizes in calkwalking on the plantation. Fletcher quoted his grandfather as saying "Your grandmother and I, we won all the prizes and were taken from plantation to plantation."

Flether related that his grandfather had told him, that when the Cake-Walk began it was known as the 'chalk-line walk'.

"Sometimes on pleasant evenings, boards would be laid down for an impromptu stage before the verandah so the guest could have a good view of the proceedings and a real shingig would take place with singing and dancing. The cake-walk. in that section and at that time, was known as the chalk line walk. There was no prancing, just a straight walk on a path made by turns and so forth, along with the dancers made their way with a pail of water on their heads. The couple that was the most erect and spilled the least or no water at all was the winner." {Tom Fletcher, "The Tom Fletcher Story-100 Years of Negro In Show Business" [New York: Burdge and Company, Ltd. 1954, p. 19]"

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LYRICS FOR "WALK TALK CHICKEN WITH YOUR HEAD PECKED OFF" IN THOMAS W. TALLEY'S BOOK "NEGRO FOLK RHYMES"

WALK, TALK, CHICKEN WITH YOUR HEAD PECKED!
Walk, talk, chicken wid yō' head pecked!
You can crow w'en youse been dead.
Walk, talk, chicken wid yō' head pecked!
You can hōl' high yō' bloody head.

You's whooped dat Blue Hen's Chicken,
You's beat 'im at his game.
If dere's some fedders on him,
Fer dat you's not to blame.

Walk, talk, chicken wid yō' head pecked!
You beat ole Johnny Blue!
Walk, talk, chicken wid yō' head pecked!
Say: "Cock-a-doo-dle-doo—!"

Negro Folk Rhymes Wise And Other Wise , originally published in 1922 by (African American)  Thomas W. Talley https://www.gutenberg.org/files/27195/27195-h/27195-h.htm, [Pg 5]
-snip-
"Walk talk" probably is a folk processed form of  "walk chalk". In 19th century and early 29th century African American culture "walk chalk" meant "to walk the chalk line", the chalk line being the dance that later became known as "the cakewalk".  

The second verse of the entitled "Gooseberry Wine" in that book (on page 45) includes the words "walk, chalk":

Oh walk chalk, Ginger Blue!
Git over double trouble.
You needn' min' de wedder
So's de win' don't blow you double."

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SPECULATIVE MEANING OF THE SONG "WALK, CHALK, CHICKEN WITH HIS HEAD PECKED OFF"
My guess is that this song uses a fight between two chickens as a analogy for two men who have fought each other. The winner's is badly bruised (His head is (almost) pecked off or he suffered a lot of pecks (bruises). But he still won that fight (He beat up/whooped the other chicken. Therefore, instead of feeling bad that he didn't completely vanquish his opponent, he should accept his win and do a winner's walk (by strutting down the perhaps imaginary chalk walk and crow "Cock-a-doo-dle-doo—!"like a confident rooster.   


This song could have been used to teach coping skills, i.e. to help children and others prepare for how they should feel and react when they are confronted by people or circumstances and they do the best the best they can do. When that happens. remember to "give yourself some slack" and "big up yourself".

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Tuesday, November 24, 2020

The Simpsons Hand Clap Rhyme (with the words "Bart's In Double Trouble" etc.)



Paisley Horton,  April 25, 2009

Alecia and Arianna doing hand games..Eliott in the back ground annoyed..lol
-snip-
The first hand clap rhyme is a version of "There's A Place On Mars".

The second rhyme is a version of "The Simpsons". That rhyme begins at .025 in that video. My transcription of that rhyme is given as Example #1 below.  

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Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams presents some information about The Simpsons animated television series.

This post also presents several examples of the hand clap rhyme entitled "The Simpsons". Some explanatory comments about these examples are included in this post.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric and recreational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the creator of The Simpsons television series. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and all those who are featured in this video and in other videos that are mentioned in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

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Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/09/the-simpsons-handclap-rhyme-examples.htmlfor a 2013 version of this pancocojams post about "The Simpsons" rhyme. That post showcases these same examples, but includes more information about the terms "double trouble", and "pump up the volume".

Also, click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/10/jazzman-in-round-springfield-episode-of.html for another 2013 pancocojams post about The Simpsons television series. That post is  entitled "Jazzman" In The "Round Springfield" Episode Of "The Simpsons" (videos & comments)

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE SIMPSONS ANIMATED TELEVISION SERIES
Excerpt #1
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Simpsons
"The Simpsons is an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting Company. The series is a satirical parody of a middle class American lifestyle epitomized by its family of the same name, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. The show is set in the fictional town of Springfield and parodies American culture, society, television, and many aspects of the human condition.

The family was conceived by Groening shortly before a solicitation for a series of animated shorts with the producer James L. Brooks. Groening created a dysfunctional family and named the characters after members of his own family, substituting Bart for his own name. The shorts became a part of The Tracey Ullman Show on April 19, 1987. After a three-season run, the sketch was developed into a half-hour prime time show and was an early hit for Fox, becoming the network's first series to land in the Top 30 ratings in a season (1989–1990).

Since its debut on December 17, 1989, the show has broadcast 530 episodes and the twenty-fourth season ended on May 19, 2013. The Simpsons is the longest-running American sitcom, the longest-running American animated program, and in 2009 it surpassed Gunsmoke as the longest-running American primetime, scripted television series. The Simpsons Movie, a feature-length film, was released in theaters worldwide on July 26 and July 27, 2007, and grossed over $527 million.

The Simpsons is widely considered to be one of the greatest television series of all time."...

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Excerpt #2
From https://simpsons.fandom.com/wiki/Bart_Simpson
...."Bartholomew JoJo "Bart" Simpson (born Sunday, April 1, 1979) is the deuteragonist of The Simpsons.

Bart is the mischievous, rebellious, misunderstood, disruptive and "potentially dangerous" eldest child. He is the only son of Homer and Marge Simpson, and the older brother of Lisa and Maggie.”…
-snip-
Here's the meaning of the word "deuteragonist" from 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deuteragonist
"In literature, the deuteragonist or secondary main character (from Ancient Greek: δευτεραγωνιστής, deuteragōnistḗs, second actor) is the second most important character, after the protagonist and before the tritagonist.[1] The deuteragonist may switch between supporting and opposing the protagonist, depending on the deuteragonist's own conflict or plot."...

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE ABOUT THESE RHYMES
To my knowledge, The Simpsons hand clap rhymes that are included in this post weren't created by anyone associated with The Simpsons television series or movie.

However,  because of the close similarities between the four examples it's likely that there was one source for this rhyme. One version was collected from an in person source in Maryland and shared with me. I happened upon the other three sources (plus one not in English which I haven't transcribed) on the internet.

With regard to the similarities, except for the example given as #1 below, each of the examples list all of or most of the names of the Simpsons family. Examples #1 and #3 include the "double trouble" phrase, the "pump up the volume" phrase, and the "criss cross applesauce" phrase.  Example #2 includes the "pump up the volume" and "criss cross applesauce" phrases and may also include the "double trouble phrase", but unfortunately, I couldn't decipher all of the words that were spoken in that video. Example #4 includes the phrase "deep trouble" which is probably a folk processed form of "double trouble". And except for Example #4, all of these four examples that I've come across end with the word "Freeze!" 

"Double trouble" means "a lot of trouble".

"Pump of the volume" technically means "to increase the sound". But, in the context of playground rhymes, it means "raise the energy level", "be more enthusiastic". "Pump up the volume" is often found in children's cheerleader cheers.

"Criss cross applesauce" is a rhyming phrase that is used in schools and community centers as a command for children to sit on the floor with their legs crossed. In these hand games, "criss cross applesauce" just serves as a rhyming phrase that combines one part of a rhyme with another part.   

**
Please share any information and/or examples of this rhyme that you know in the comment section for this pancocojams post. Remember to add demographics (where-city & state you live/d in when you first heard this rhyme and when (year or decade) you first heard this rhyme. 

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EXAMPLES OF THE HAND CLAP RHYME "THE SIMPSONS"
Example #1
Sin Sin Sin
We do twist 
And I do twist 
And Maggie Maggie Maggie twist 
And Mart is double trouble
Mart is double trouble
Criss cross
The apple sauce
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Now freeze 1 time
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Now freeze
- Alecia and Arianna, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJ9PPA7MaJk&feature=grec_index , April 25, 2009; transcribed by Azizi Powell on September 5, 2010 [video embedded above]

-snip-
Additions and corrections are welcome. 
"Sin sin sin" is probably a folk processed form of the phrase "shame shame shame". Those words are  used as an introductory line for certain children's hand clap rhyme, particularly those that originated among African Americans. One well known example of hand games that often begin with "shame shame shame" is "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico".

"Twist" may be the word "tricks".

Maggie is a folk processed name for the character's name "Marge" in The Simpsons series.

"Mart" is a folk processed form of the character's name "Bart" 
in The Simpsons series.

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Example #2
THE SIMPSONS HAND GAME [partial transcription]
The Simpsons
The Simpsons:
Bart Simpson
Lisa Simpson
Homer and Marge
????
????
????
????
Criss Cross
Apple sauce
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Freeze!
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
And Freeze!
-renjs, Uploaded on Aug 27, 2008
-snip-
Additions and corrections are welcome.
-snip-
The summary of this video is "Ren, Eric, Alex, Renee doing what Renee wants to do... again"
-snip-
Unfortunately, the visuals and sound for this video are very poor quality.  However, this example documents one way that this hand game is performed.   

Here's a description of this video:
A Black man, two young Black boys and a young Black girl form a circle and clap each others hands in the beginning portion of this rhyme to a syncopated beat. The participants then perform body motions which correspond to the words that are said. For instance, on the words "criss cross", the participants cross their arms on their chest. And on the word "Freeze!", the participants "freeze in place" (make a funny or dramatic pose and remain perfectly still for a very short amount of time.)

The words to this rhyme are difficult to hear, but I believe that the words that the participants recited are the same as or very similar to the words given in Version #3 below.

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Example #3

THE SIMPSONS 
The Simpsons
Bart Simpson
Lisa Simpson
Homer and Marge
That’s not all-
Bart’s in double trouble

Bart Simpson
Lisa Simpson
Homer and Marge
That’s not all-
Bart’s in double trouble

Criss Cross
Apple sauce
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Freeze!

Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
For the last time

Freeze!
-Tamia, (12 year old African American girl, Maryland) Oct 29, 2005; collected by Marimba for Azizi Powell

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Example #4
lisa simpson, bart simpson, homer simpson, bart
B-A-R-T B-A-R-T B-A-R-T BART
i said a deep da deep da deep trouble
i said a deep da deep da deep trouble
-Anietie, http://www.facebook.com/topic.php?uid=2204285338&topic=2724&post=25803#topic_top, October 7, 2006

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Sunday, November 22, 2020

The Name "Frankenstein" In Examples Of Children's Jump Rope & Handclap Rhymes

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is pancocojams post presents some information about the 19th century novel Frankenstein and documents a few examples of children's jump rope and handclap rhymes that include the name "Frankenstein". 

The content of this post is presented for cultural and recreational purposes.

I'm particularly interested in how Frankenstein is characterized in these rhyme examples.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Mary Shelley for writing the Frankenstein novel and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.


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INFORMATION ABOUT THE FRANKENSTEIN NOVEL
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankenstein#Frankenstein_and_the_Monster
"Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is an 1818 novel written by English author Mary Shelley (1797–1851) that tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who creates a sapient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Shelley started writing the story when she was 18, and the first edition was published anonymously in London on 1 January 1818, when she was 20.[2] Her name first appeared in the second edition published in Paris in 1821.

[...]

It has had a considerable influence in literature and popular culture and spawned a complete genre of horror stories, films and plays.

Since the publication of the novel, the name "Frankenstein" has often been used to refer to the monster itself.[8][9][10]

[…]

Frankenstein and the Monster

Part of Frankenstein's rejection of his creation is the fact that he does not give it a name, which causes a lack of identity. Instead it is referred to by words such as "wretch", "monster", "creature", "demon", "devil", "fiend", and "it"."...
-snip-
This sentence is given in italics to highlight it.

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EXAMPLES OF CHILDREN'S HAND CLAP RHYMES THAT INCLUDE THE NAME "FRANKENSTEIN"
These examples are given in no particular order. Some of these examples are complete rhymes and some of "clips" of longer rhymes. Hyperlinks for the online source for these rhymes are given with the examples. With the exception of the examples given as #9 and #10, no explanations for terms are given in this post.

Numbers are given for referencing purposes.

Click the "African American children's rhyme and cheers" and "children's rhymes and tag other pancocojams posts that may include comments about some of these rhymes.

Please add examples in the comment section below of children's recreational rhymes 
that include the name Frankenstein  Remember to include demographic information such as year or decade you chanted it and which city/state or nation if outside of the United States. Thanks in advance!

1. MISS SUZIE HAD A STEAMBOAT 
 Miss Suzie had a steamboat, 
her steamboat had a bell (ding ding),
Miss Suzie went to heaven,
her steamboat went to...
HELL...o operator
please give me number nine, 
And if you disconnect me
I'll cut off your...
Behind the refridgerator
there lay a piece of glass
Miss Suzie sat upon it and cut her big fat...
Ask me no more questions,
I'll tell you now more lies
The boys are in the bathroom 
zipping up their..
Flies are in the meadow, 
the bees are in the park,
Miss Suzie and her boyfriend
are kissing in the...
D-a-r-k, d-a-r-k, dark dark dark.
The dark is like the movies,
the movies' like the show,
The show is like tv
and that is all I know...
Know know, 
I know I know my ma
I know I know my pa,
I know I know my sister
with the 80 meter bra.
My mother is Godzilla,
my father is King Kong.
My sister is the idiot
who made up this dumb song.
My mother gave me a nickle,
my father gave me a dime
My sister gave me a boyfriend,
his name was Frankenstein.
He made me do the dishes, 
he made me wash the floor
He made we wash his underpants
and I kicked him out the door!
I kicked him over London,
I kicked him over France,
I kicked him over Hollywoood
and he lost his underpants.
Miss Suzie had a baby,
she named him Tiny Tim.
She put him in the bathtub
to see if he could swim.
He drank up all the water,
he ate up all the soap.
He tried to eat the bathtub
but it wouldn't fit down his throat.
Miss Suzie called the doctor,
Miss Suzie called the nurse
Miss Suzie called the lady
with the alligator purse.
Chicken pox said the doctor,
measles said the nurse
Nothing said the lady
with the alligator purse.
Pennicillan said the doctor,
caster oil said the nurse.
Pizzia said the lady
with the alligator purse!
Miss Suzie knocked the doctor. 
Miss Suzie punched the nurse.
Miss Suzie paid the lady with the alligator purse!
-http://www.inthe80s.com/rhymes.shtml
-snip-
This example is reformatted from the paragraph form which is found on that site.

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2. MISS SUSIE HAD A STEAMBOAT (HELLO OPERATOR) [clip of longer rhyme] 
 [...] 

I wish I had a nickel
I wish I had a dime
I wish I had a boyfriend
Who kissed me all the time!

My Ma gave me a nickel
My Pa gave me a dime.
My Sister gave me a boyfriend,
Who'd kiss me all the time

My Ma took back the nickel,
My Pa took back the dime.
My Sister took back her boyfriend,
and gave me Frankenstein!

He made me wash the dishes,
He made me wash the floors,
He made me wash his underwear,
So I kicked him out the door

I kicked him over London,
I kicked him over France.
I kicked him to Hawaii,
where he learned to Hula dance!"...
https://www.nurseryrhymes.org/miss-susie-had-a-steamboat-hello-operator.html

****
3. 
MS SUZIE HAD A STEAMBOAT [clip of longer rhyme]   
"I'm not sure that was ever a song, but I know it as a jump rope chant from long ago.

In it's entirety it goes like this:

Ms. Suzie Had a Steamboat

Ms. Suzie had a steamboat,
The steamboat had a bell, (ding-ding)
Ms. Suzie went to heaven and the steamboat went to-
hello operator,
please give me number nine,
and if you disconnect me I will chop off your-

[...]

My mom gave me a nickel,
my dad gave me a dime,
my sis gave me her boyfriend,
who hit me all the time!
I gave mom back the nickel,
I gave dad back the dime,
I traded back the boyfriend,
Instead got frankenstein!
He made me wash the dishes,
he made me scrub the floor!
He made me call him “your highness”
and more and more and more!


Notice all the politically and socially incorrectness of the original words! You won't be hearing THAT on a schoolyard anywhere. Of course, I doubt if kids jump rope anymore, either.
-claudiacake, 2008, https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081205222059AAgR6lR

****
4.
 I WISH I HAD A NICKEL
I wish I had a nickle,
I wish I had a dime,
I wish I had a boyfriend
to kiss me all the time.

My mom gave me a nickle,
my dad gave me a dime,
my sister gave me a boyfriend
to kiss me all the time.

My mom took back the nickle,
my dad took back the dime,
but no one took the boyfriend
who looked like Frankenstein. 
-
 http://nz-home-schooling.blogspot.com/2006/05/chants-and-clapping-games.html#NICKLE
Saturday, May 13, 2006; Chants and Clapping Games (Thanks to Rifter]

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5. YOUR MAMA, YOUR DADDY, YOUR GREASY GREASY GRANNY 
your mama,
your daddy,
your greasy greasy granny
with the hole in her panties,
with a big behind,
like frankenstein-
going beep beep beep
down sesame street!
-AMY!, cocojams.com, 6/28/2007
-snip-
"cocojams" was the name of  my cultural website that was active from January 2001 to Nov. 2014.
A lot of children and teenagers used that website's easy feature for posting examples of rhymes and cheers. 

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6. YO MAMA YO GREASY GREASY GRAND MAMMY
I am 25 now and learned this when I was in KG, i'm from North Carolina.
yo mamma
yo, mamma,
yo greasy greasy grand mammy,
she got a big behind like frankinstine,
it goes beat beat beat like sesame street.
-Erica, cocojams.com, 1/3/2008

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7. YO MAMA YO DADDY YO GREASY STANK GRANNY
Yo mama
yo daddy
yo greasy stank granny
she got holes in her panties
she got a big behind
like Frankenstein
your mama got a big ole butt
-CinciDiva, Yo Mama, Yo Daddy, Yo greasy stank granny!; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMtZXXIHLwY&ab_channel=CinciDivaFeb 13, 2011 

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8. YO BALD HEADED GRANNY 
[...]

My mama, my daddy, my bald headed granny
She's 99
She thinks she's fine
But she goin out with Frankenstein
Go granny, go granny, go granny.
Woo!

[...]
-sonnym2004, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKsMeC1X6oY&feature=emb_logo&ab_channel=sonnym2004, Yo Bald-Headed Granny, Jul 1, 2011

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9. 
U-G-L-Y
U-G-L- Y 
you ain't got no aliby 
you ugly, 
yeah yeah you ugly 
Don't be sad 
don't be blue 
Frankenstein was ugly too 
You ugly, 
yeah yeah 
you ugly 
-anonymous, cocojams, no date recorded.
-snip-
This example is actually a children's/teenagers' taunting rhyme that may not have any accompanying activities. A version of this rhyme was performed as a high school cheerleader cheer in the 1986 sports comedy movie entitled Wildcats.  

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10. ON A MOUNTAIN STANDS A CASTLE 
We had one which I'm struggling to remember

On a mountain stands a castle
Whose the owner? Frankenstien
And his daughter, Pansy Porter
She's his only valentine
-Gooseyloosie, www.mumsnet.com/Talk/other_subjects/375176-skipping-rhymes , 21-Aug-07 05
-snip-
Here's information about Pansy Potter from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pansy_Potter
"Pansy Potter The Strongman's Daughter is a British comic strip series created in 1938 by Hugh McNeill for the magazine The Beano.[1] The series appeared first in the issue dated 17 December 1938. The protagonist is Pansy Potter, a girl who has super strength.

[…]

Publication information
Stars in: Pansy Potter (1938 - 1949, 1989 - 1993)
Other names:  Pansy Potter, the Strong Man's Daughter
First appearance: Issue (17 December 1938)
Last appearance: 1993 (returned 2012) ...."

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