Translate

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Spoken Word Performance - "Black Girl Blues" by MasterPiece Poet (video with partial lyrics)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases a video of the spoken word "Black Girl Blues" by MasterPiece Poet.

Partial lyrics of this spoken word poem are included in this post along with editorial notes about some of the references in that poem. This post also includes brief information about MasterPiece Poet, as well as selected comments from this video's discussion thread.

The content of this post is presented for cultural and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to MasterPiece Poet for her powerful spoken word "Black Girl Blues". Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to All Def Poetry, the publisher of this post on YouTube.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT MASTERPIECE POET
From https://www.reverbnation.com/masterpiece83
"Artist Bio
MasterPiece the poetess was born in Dallas, Tx. She also lived in Arizona for seven years while studying Theatre Arts and Business Administration at the University of Arizona. She began performing and acting at the age of 6 and also discovered a love for poetry at 13. Her passion for poetry and performing arts has inspired many people. The debut album Mind of MasterPiece introduces a new genre of music coined by MasterPiece herself: rhythm and poetry. The cd chronicles her story through powerful words, emotions, rhyme, thought provoking lyrics and smooth rhythmic music that has a hint of hip hop, soul, and jazz all mixed into one. Fans recognize her as a dynamic writer with poise, talent, and beauty. She continues to maintain a balance between the arts and business by being an extraordinary poet/performer and business woman. Her hobbies include basketball, dancing, cooking, designing webpages, traveling, and watching movies. Her poet name MasterPiece stems from the idea that all artists strive to achieve and put forth their best work possible. It is a metaphor for a successful artist."...

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: Masterpiece Poet - "Black Girl Blues" | All Def Poetry x Da Poetry Lounge



All Def Poetry Published on Aug 19, 2015

Subscribe for more poetry! http://bit.ly/alldefpoetry

....All Def Poetry is a new channel brought to you by Russell Simmons - a world-renowned champion of the spoken word art form. Fresh, riveting, and featuring some of the best voices in the genre, All Def Poetry brings you the raw power of spoken word! #AllDefPoetry

****
SELECTED LYRICS FROM THIS SPOKEN WORD
[1:22- 1:39 of this video]

Black girl, free yourself.
And when you fly
Tell ’em Fannie Lou Hamer sent you.
Tell ‘em, you are your own queen.
Tell ‘em your brown suga maple syrup can't be bought off shelves.
Tell ’em dark don’t mean dirty,
Nappy don’t mean nasty.
Loud don’t mean ratchet.
Bold don’t mean problematic.


[2:07-2:39 of this video]

We have a purpose here.
You can’t take that away.
You can’t Emmett Till our sons no more.
You can’t 16 Street Baptist Church burn our bodies no more.
You can’t walk up in the church and shoot us in prayer no more.
You can’t kill us in the jail cell and call it suicide no more.
This ain’t open season.

Black girl, you are brick.
You are mortar.
You are designed.
You are ceiling.
More than just measurement.

Raise your head.
This Black girl ain’t got no Blues tonight.
You be you.
In your Blues you beautiful as you wanna be.
Dark eyes, thick thighs, we don’t need to apologize.
-snip-
These words flow together in rhythmic form. I added the spacing for reading clarity only.

I'm sorry for any mistakes in this partial transcription. Any corrections are welcome.

Here's information regarding some of the historical references in this excerpt of "MasterPiece Poet's "Black Girl Blues" spoken word:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fannie_Lou_Hamer
"Fannie Lou Hamer ... October 6, 1917 – March 14, 1977) was an American voting rights activist, civil rights leader, and philanthropist. She was instrumental in organizing Mississippi's Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and later became the vice-chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, which she represented at the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey."...
-snip-
Regarding why she was a civil rights activist, Fannie Lou Hamer said “I’m sick and tired of being sick and tired”.

**
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/16th_Street_Baptist_Church
"The 16th Street Baptist Church is a Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama, that is frequented predominantly by African Americans. In September 1963, it was the target of the racially motivated 16th Street Baptist Church bombing that killed four girls in the midst of the American Civil Rights Movement. The church is still in operation and is a central landmark in the Birmingham Civil Rights District. It was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 2006."...

**
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmett_Till
"Emmett Louis Till (July 25, 1941 – August 28, 1955) was an African-American teenager who was lynched in Mississippi at the age of 14 after reportedly flirting with a white woman...

Till's body was returned to Chicago. His mother, who had mostly raised him, insisted on a public funeral service with an open casket to show the world the brutality of the killing. "The open-coffin funeral held by Mamie Till Bradley exposed the world to more than her son Emmett Till's bloated, mutilated body. Her decision focused attention not only on American racism and the barbarism of lynching but also on the limitations and vulnerabilities of American democracy.

...Till's murder is noted as a pivotal catalyst to the next phase of the Civil Rights Movement."...

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS SHOWCASE VIDEO'S DISCUSSION THREAD
These comments are given in chronological order based on their publishing date-except for replies- with the oldest comment given first. However, these comments may not be in consecutive order. I've assigned numbers to these comments for referencing purposes only.

2015
1. Kendrick-Kamau “StreetPolitik” El-Negasi
"This is one of the dopest poems I've heard in a long. She had the wordplay and righteous aggression spelled out for you, undeniably witty but easy to digest with urgency like milk to a babe."
-snip-
"dopest" = African American Vernacular English term meaning "the very best"

**
2. MasterPiece [2016]
"+Kendrick-Kamau “StreetPolitik” El-Negasi Thank you so much!!!"

**
Reply
3. Kendrick-Kamau “StreetPolitik” El-Negasi1 month ago
"+MasterPiece no problem, thank you for creating & sharing."

**
4. lobster0right
"said the woman wearing a weave"
-snip-
"weave" (hair weave) = real or fake hair that is woven or glued to person's real hair to add length and/or fullness. (also called "extensions")

**
Reply
5. Jamesha Michelle
"Excuse you, but a hairstyle defines nothing."

**
Reply
6. Kai Jolly
"What the [profanity deleted] does that have to do with anything?"

**
Reply
7. inspirebabe_
"+lobster0right She can do what she want with her hair!"

**
8. Monkey Teeth
"+Jamesha Michelle you can't have it both ways! You can't recite verses about the veneration of black women and the uniqueness of the black women while simotaneously wearing the hair texture of a white women...some serious self worth issues going on here"

**
Reply
9. Nae2588
"+Monkey Teeth my niece is dark as night, but she was born with straight black hair, she's 8 now, and my friend her hair is still straight, never been touched by a perm, nor a flat iron or a pressing comb. her mom mainly did her hair, and her mom got thrown in prison on drug charges, so if it was nappy someone needed to do it, because white European hair as u claim, we all know can fix itself, just as soon as they get out of bed."

**
Reply
10. wild heart
"+Monkey Teeth What do you mean? She is clearly a black woman who loves herself unapologetically. Plus Black women get judged for whatever they do with her hair. Black women should be able to do whatever they want with it without being criticized."

**
Reply
11. Kai Jolly
"+wild heart I agree."

**
Reply
12. Velvet Velours
"+Nae2588 that's your niece. 90% of black people do not have naturally straight hair"

**
Reply
13. Kai Jolly [2016]
"+Zhang Yixing But some of them do lol.
-snip-
It appears that Zhang Yixing is another screen name for Velvet Velours.

**
Reply
14. Dana Newman [2016]
"+lobster0right It's not about her hair..."

**
Reply
15. Asia Speights [2016]
"....? Because white women don't wear weaves? [Profanity initials deleted] does her hair have to do with ANYTHING."

**
16. Rebecca Shogunle
"strong. powerful. insightful and definitely true beyond doubt"

**
17. Monkey Teeth
"Look how confident and proud she seems. Snatch that wig off her head and watch her confidence instantly disappear as she runs off stage embarrassed of her God given hair !"

**
Reply
18. Azandria Hudson [2016]
"Her weave isn't a mask just simply a style. You don't have to wear your natural hair 24/7 to love yourself and be woke"

**
19. Nae2588
"amazing. black power"

**
Reply
20. G Den [2016]
"Stop it! this is not about "Black Power" or hating others. it's about uplifting our Black women, specifically those who are less mixed than others (Dark Skin). I will not allow YOU to make something so beautiful ugly.

-Black Activist/Community Member"

**
21. mrschrisbrown416
"love this with the entire life of me."

**
22. Emmanuel Mango
"What's her name?"

**
Reply
23. MasterPiece
"+David Emmanuel MasterPiece.... Check out masterpiecepoet on IG"
-snip-
"IG" = "Instagram".

**
24. Snoopy Thompson
"She Tells It Like It Tis"

****
2016
25. Awo Abdi
" "our sons don't need sunscreen, they run from protection" you're lying if you say you didn't get chills."
-snip-
This comment refers to this portion of that spoken word [from 1:40-1:53] in this video:
"They say 'The blacker the berry the sweeter the juice'
But nowdays it's 'The blacker the baby, the longer the noose.'
Our sons don't need sunscreen.
They run from protection.
They get their vitamin D from laying 4 hours face down on the ground."
-snip-
"The blacker the berry the sweeter the juice" is a recurring saying in African American folk culture since at least 1922 (Thomas W. Talley's Negro Folk Songs: Wise & Otherwise (song/poem "You Love You Girl". Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/06/timeline-for-cultural-use-of-saying.html for a pancocojams post on that saying.

The line "they get their vitamin D from laying face down on the ground" is probably a referent to the August 9, 2014 shooting of 18 year old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri by Darren Wilson, 28, a White Ferguson police officer and Michael Brown's body laying unattended for hours after the shooting.

**
26. Adrian Ware
"talk about the power. You can definitely here it in her voice. So moving. The queen just spoke"
-snip-
Since the late 1960s Black nationalist movement in the United States "queen" has been a complimentary referent for a Black woman.

**
27. jack
"Great poem oh my lord! I have chills.

For anyone asking, the song is Behind Closed Doors by Muoi."

**
28. Lemonslay
"You're beautiful with your skin like moonlight and your eyes like the moon."
-snip-
These words may be found in this spoken word, but I'm not sure where they are in this video.

**
29. Sade Tucker
"I give this millions of snaps!!! Incredibly executed!"

**
30. angela modifo
"amandla!!!"
-snip-
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amandla_(power)
"Amandla is a Zulu and Xhosa word meaning "power". The word was a popular rallying cry in the days of resistance against Apartheid, used by the African National Congress and its allies. The leader of a group would call out "Amandla!" and the crowd would respond with "Awethu"[1] or "Ngawethu!"[2] (to us), completing the South African version of the rallying cry Power to the People!.[3] The word is still associated with struggles against oppression."...

**
31. Vikki Costello
"what !! amazing Queen! all I can say is powers to the most high & #Kudos cause that was God sent"

**
32. mariemonstre
"Very powerful but also a little saddening. As a mixed child, I feel hurt that she talks about us mixed children are made out of some desire to purge undesirable traits. But I say my parents loved each other. As apparently unbelievable as it seems. And she stays she doesn't want to be attacked for her appearance, yet she attacks us. Think about that."

**
Reply
33. mariemonstre
"Says* not stays"
-snip-
mariemonstre is referring to the portion of the line that is spoken at around 1:00 in this video "She got flavor- ain't that how those mulatto babies are made?"

**
34. Nina H
"Does anybody know where I can find this typed out? I cant understabd her in some parts :("

**
Reply
35. MasterPiece
"+Nina H Book will be released soon ;p"

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Sunday, June 26, 2016

Slim Harpo - Baby, Scratch My Back (with film clips of old Blues dancing)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases a video of the Blues/R&B song as performed by Slim Harpo. Information about Slim Harpo, the lyrics to this song, and selected comments from this video's discussion thread are also included in this post.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Slim Harpo for his musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post, and thanks to Allan Gange, the producer and publisher of this video on YouTube.

Hat tip to Pittsburgh's storyteller, harpo, and folklorist Amir Rashid for hipping me to Slim Harpo, and the fact that a "harpo" is someone who plays a harp (harmonica).

****
INFORMATION ABOUT SLIM HARPO
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slim_Harpo
"James Isaac Moore (January 11, 1924 – January 31, 1970),[1][nb 1] better known by his stage name Slim Harpo, was an American blues musician, a leading exponent of the swamp blues style, and "one of the most commercially successful blues artists of his day".[2] His most successful and influential recordings included "I'm a King Bee" (1957), "Rainin' In My Heart" (1961), and "Baby Scratch My Back" (1966) which reached no. 1 on the R&B chart and no.16 on the US pop chart. A master of the blues harmonica, his stage name was derived from the popular nickname for that instrument, the "harp".[3]...

He had his biggest commercial success in 1966, when the predominantly instrumental "Baby Scratch My Back" reached no.1 on the R&B chart and no.16 on the US pop chart. Harpo described it as "an attempt at rock & roll for me." Like his previous records, it was recorded with producer J. D. Miller and the regular Excello musicians, including guitarist Rudy Richard, bassist James Johnson and drummer Jesse Kinchen, in Crowley, Louisiana."...

****
LYRICS: BABY, SCRATCH MY BACK (Single Version)
(Slim Harpo)

Aw, I'm itchy
And I don't know where to scratch
Come here baby
Scratch my back
I know you can do it
So baby, get to it

Aw, you're workin with it now
You got me feelin' so good
Little bit to the center now, baby
Hmm-mmm!

This little girl sho' knows how to scratch
Now, you're doin' the chicken-scratch
Aw, it's lookin' good, baby
Just gettin' scratchy
That's what I'm talkin' about

Source: https://play.google.com/music/preview/Tscv2iuvwielg5hx4fazad26e5u?lyrics=1&utm_source=google&utm_medium=search&utm_campaign=lyrics&pcampaignid=kp-lyrics

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: Slim Harpo Baby, Scratch My Back



Allan Gange, Uploaded on Feb 3, 2010

Slim Harpo's cool classic set to old dance clips and animals scratching
-snip-
selected comments from this video's discussion thread:
This comments are presented in chronological order based on their posting date, except for replies, with the oldest dated by year comment given first. However, these comments may not be in consecutive order. I've assigned numbers for referencing purposes only.

2010
1. theophano
"This is Louisiana "swamp blues"."

**
2. kajunmoon
"slim harpo from lobell,louisiana ..that scarch in the guitar he called it the chicken scratch ,i think rudy richard is playing it idk i do know rudy is playing and alive and well.."

**
3. lsubail
"@kajunmoon
James Johnson on guitar on this track. Rudy did play on many. Both are still playing in the Baton Rouge area"

**
4. briggsm
"whatever those two guys are doing at 0:07 i wanna learn it! whats that called?"

**
Reply
5. fatguyinlittlecoat86
"@briggsm I don't know what is called, but if you look up So You Think You Can Dance! Season 7 Week 3 practice session of Alex Wong and Twitch (Twilex), you can see them practicing this dance for their up-coming performance."

**
2011
6. Atomank68
"Huuuyaah! Real southern, backwoods "country" blues and soul. Loved this one since I was five years old!"

**
2012
7. robin2012ism
"I liked the rubber legs best. Job well done - for your first too!"

**
8. Mayer Shalelhashbazz
"great tune, excellent montage. well done.

ty"

**
9. margaret andrews
"Thanks for the video..very nice job!!! talking bout some kool kats.. the brothers that was dancing in the field..if I am not mistaken the one that was movin his foot like he was slidin.. that dance use to be called by the ol' folks the "sloup"...I know it sounds crazy but I remember that dance...Thanks again, very good" job!!
-snip-
"Sloup" = "slop"

****
2013
10. Lily Bell
"Does anyone have any idea who these people are who are featured in this video?"

**
Reply
11. Allan Gange
"Hi Lily Bell. I can tell you the clips I used (they are all on YouTube). The bendy man is Earl "Snake Hips" Tucker. The original video is in colour. The group with the harmonica and the break dancer are from the clip of The Mills Brothers singing Caravan. The two fellas dancing by the fence are slowed down. They are actually dancing to Muddy Waters singing Got My Mojo Working at the newport jazz festival. Hope that helps"

**
12. GOLDBAND45rpm
"Those two guys dancing in the video is taken from 'Newport Jazz Festival 1960' during Muddy Water's performance OR 'Jazz On a Summer's Day' during Chuck Berry's performance.Which one anybody?"

**
Reply
13. Allan Gange
"Hi. I can confirm that it was taken from Muddy Waters performance of Got My Mojo Working - I had to slow the footage down to try and match the music. It was my first video. Seems like forever ago"

**
14. Mark King
"So many Great musicians who were really never appreciated as much as they should have been and Slim is one of them. Love you man!"

**
15. MAJORSNODGRASS
"Who is the guitarist please????"

**
Reply
16. GOLDBAND45rpm
"Poor records of participating musicians makes recording details difficult to map out at times but guitarist on this recording could be either Rudolph Richard or James Johnsson or even Slim himself who was more active on some of his later recordings"

**
17. Byron Stevens
"This is one of them Sure Nuf R&B Records that we wouldhave to play3 or 4 times on our air shift per day. Hang in there People."

**
18. Trixie Hutts
"nice dance what was that called talkig about the in the back ground the rubber leg"

****
2015
19. ayahuascayage
"A very well done and entertaining video that really accentuates one of my favorite Slim Harpo songs. Thanks."

**
20. David White
"I recognize "Snake Hips" (the fellow on stage with the white shirt) -- but who are the two gents dancing outside by the picket fence, what movie are those group dance scenes from, and who's that hillbilly band?"

**
Reply
21. Level Lez
"+David Whiteis the two gents dancing1960 Newport Fest"

**
Reply
22. Bill Mavin [2016]
+David Whiteis Newport Festival dancing to got my mojo working. Saw it on you tube

**
23. Old Chrome
"Cool vid! Congrats. I saw in this the origins of Elvis's moves and the origins of break dancing!"

**
14. J. Foster
"OMG! Breakdancers! Moonwalking!" 

**
25. Phil Bell
"A rare blues classic, what a gem ! I defy anybody out there to name the harmonica player ! don't tell me the obvious answer of Slim himself (which is perfectly possible). Whoever it is they can really play that thing. I hope they were well rewarded for their talent. It gets my vote ! thanx Slim !"

**
Reply
26. Bill Mavin [2016]
"+Phil Bell Lazy Lester"

**
27. THEMOJOMANsince1959
"I love to read the comments and realize that I'm not alone lovin' the Blues like I do. It's so sad they didn't have videos or more films of our early R&B & Rock pioneers. Today's kids will never really know will they?"

**
Reply
28. Wesley Cole
"+THEMOJOMANsince1959 I'm 18 and me and my friends love blues. Today's kids know more than you might think."

**
29. Kimberly Reynolds
"I like this video very much. this was the type music I was raised on. I always loved the blues."

**
30. Tonithenightowl
"I wonder if the dancers from Soul Train realized where they got their moves from? lol Such a cool song and loved the video."

****
2016
31. billy fatbowe
"......This music taste better than the music yo mama used to make.....'-)0////"

**
32. byron, stevens
"A great big sound that was on the Chitlin Circuit."

**
33. 59cadcoupe
"I bought this song when it was brand new, it was different from anything else on the radio. Still love it!

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Saturday, June 25, 2016

Four YouTube Examples Of Yoruba Bolojo Music

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part series on the Yoruba people's Bolojo music & dance. Bolojo music is a form of popular music that developed among the Egbado (Yewa) Yoruba people in the 1970s.

Part II showcases one sound file of Bolojo music by Akinna Vasco Da Gama and one sound file by King Jossy Friday. This post also showcases two videos of Bolojo music by Zeynab.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/06/yoruba-bolojo-music-dance-online.html for Part I of this post. Part I provides a compilation of information about Bolojo music & dance from several online articles and YouTube video discussion threads.

The content of this post is presented for cultural and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the featured artists whose sound files and videos are showcased in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these examples on YouTube.

****
DISCLAIMER:
I'm sharing this music to document this information and help spread examples of this music/dance.

I only know about Bolojo music from coming across examples as a result of "YouTube surfing" African music, and then using Google to search for information about that music genre.

Note: The four examples of Bolojo music that are showcased in this series aren't the only examples of Bolojo music on YouTube. However, I've only found a few more examples of that music on that site. Additional information about this information and its recording artists and additional publication of musical examples would be very welcome.

****
SHOWCASE EXAMPLES
These examples are presented in chronological order baded on the examples' publishing date on YouTube, with the oldest dated example given first.

Example #1: Fasco Da Gama - Aiyetoro Social Club



EgbaAlake Uploaded on Jun 24, 2011

bolojo music. Akanni Vasco Da Gama

****
Example #2: KING JOSSY FRIDAY - BOLOJO SPECIAL



EgbaAlake Uploaded on Sep 11, 2011

Bolojo music

****
Example #3: Zeynab -Mogba Ara Da (Bolojo)



Zeynab Abib Published on Jun 22, 2012

Zeynab performing Pour son Amour (C) 2011 Fekema Prod & Osha Studios

****
Example #4: ZEYNAB - BOLOJO "Medley"



Zeynab Abib , Published on Aug 31, 2015

Zeynab performing Bolojo "Medley"
(C) 2015 Fekema Prod

****
This concludes Part II of this series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Yoruba "Bolojo" Music & Dance - Online Information & Comments

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a two part series on the Yoruba people's Bolojo music & dance.

Part I provides a compilation of information about Bolojo music & dance from several online articles and YouTube video discussion threads.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/06/four-youtube-examples-of-yoruba-bolojo.html for Part II of this series. Part II showcases sound file and video examples of Bolojo music by Akinna Vasco Da Gama, King Jossey Friday, and Zeynab Abib. (These artists names are given in chronological order of their examples publishing on YouTube.)

The content of this post is presented for folkloric and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the developers and early Bolojo recording artists and thanks to all contemporary recording artists and performers of that music & dance. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
DISCLAIMER:
I'm quoting these excerpts/comments to document this information and help spread examples of this music/dance.

I only know about Bolojo music from coming across examples as a result of "YouTube surfing" African music, and then using Google to search for information about that music genre.

Note: The four examples of Bolojo music that are showcased in this series aren't the only examples of Bolojo music on YouTube. However, I've only found a few more examples of that music on that site. Additional information about this information and its recording artists and additional publication of musical examples would be very welcome.

****
FORMAT FOR THIS POST
These article excerpts are placed in no particular order. The excerpts are numbered for referencing purposes only.

The comments are given under their YouTube sound file or video link and are presented in chronological order based on their publishing dates, except for responses. The example numbers correspond to the number the sound file or video was given in Part II of this pancocojams series.

****
ARTICLE EXCERPTS
Background - an article about the Yoruba people and an article about the nation of Benin
Excerpt #1:
he Yoruba people (Yoruba: Àwọn ọmọ Yorùbá) are an ethnic group of Southwestern and North central Nigeria as well as Southern and Central Benin known as the Yorubaland cultural region of West Africa. The Yoruba constitute over 40 million people in total; the majority of this population is from Nigeria and make up 21% of its population, according to the CIA World Factbook,[1] making them one of the largest ethnic groups in Africa.

The Yoruba share borders with the Borgu in Benin; the Nupe and Ebira in central Nigeria; and the Edo, the Ẹsan, and the Afemai in mid-western Nigeria. The Igala and other related groups are found in the northeast, and the Egun, Fon, Ewe and others in the southeast Benin. The Itsekiri who live in the north-west Niger delta are related to the Yoruba but maintain a distinct cultural identity. Significant Yoruba populations in other West African countries can be found in Ghana,[8][9][10] Togo,[9] Ivory Coast,[11] Liberia and Sierra Leone.[12]

The Yoruba diaspora consists of two main groupings, one of them includes relatively recent migrants, the majority of which moved to the United States and the United Kingdom after major economic changes in the 1970s; the other is a much older population dating back to the Atlantic slave trade. This older community has branches in such countries as Cuba, Saint Lucia, Brazil, Grenada,[13] and Trinidad and Tobago.[14][15][16][17][18][19]...

Religion and mythology
The Yoruba faith, variously known as Aborisha, Orisha-Ifa or simply (and erroneously) Ifa, is commonly seen as one of the principal components of the African traditional religions.

Orisa'nla, also known as Ọbatala,[45] was the arch-divinity chosen by Olodumare, the Supreme God, to create solid land out of the primordial water that then constituted the earth and populating the land with human beings.

Traditional Yoruba religion
The Yorùbá religion comprises the traditional religious and spiritual concepts and practices of the Yoruba people.[47] Its homeland is in Southwestern Nigeria and the adjoining parts of Benin and Togo, a region that has come to be known as Yorubaland. Yorùbá religion is formed of diverse traditions and has no single founder.[48] Yoruba religious beliefs are part of itan, the total complex of songs, histories, stories and other cultural concepts which make up the Yorùbá society.[48]...

Today, most contemporary Yoruba are Christians and Muslims. Be that as it may, many of the principles of the traditional faith of their ancestors are either knowingly or unknowingly upheld by a significant proportion of the populations of Nigeria, Benin and Togo."...

****
Excerpt #2:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Benin
"Benin has played an important role in the African music scene, producing one of the biggest stars to come out of the continent in Angélique Kidjo. Post-independence, the country was home to a vibrant and innovative music scene, where native folk music combined with Ghanaian highlife, French cabaret, American rock, funk and soul, and Congolese rumba. It also has a rich variety of ethnomusicological traditions...

The majority of Benin’s 9.32 million people live in the south. The population includes about 42 ethnic groups overall. These include coastal populations of Yoruba in the southeast, who migrated from what is now Nigeria in the 12th century, the Fon in the south central area around Abomey, Mina, Xueda and Aja who came from what is now Togo.

Northern peoples include the Dendi in the north-central area, who came from what is now Mali in the 16th century, the Bariba and Fula people in the northeast and the Betammaribe and Somba in the Atacora Range."...

****
Article excerpts about Bolojo music/dance
Excerpt #1:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilaro
..."Ilaro, Ogun State is a town in Ogun State, Nigeria.

Ilaro was founded in the 18th century by Aro who migrated from the Oyo town[2] to settle down in Igbo Aje,[3] a little hill situated at the centre of the town from where he and his warriors could sight enemies (mostly slave traders from the neighbouring Benin republic known then as Dahomey) on attack from a long distance. Aro himself was a warrior and a hunter to be reckoned with. Ilaro had her name from "Ilu Aro"[2] meaning the settlement of Aro which later became Ilaro for ease of pronunciation.

Ancient Ilaro town was blessed with great farmers, hunters and warriors out of which Orona and Osata ranked the files of Ilaro history. In the history laid by these humble kinsmen and peace-loving individuals, apart from saving the lives of their kinsmen from the hands of the invading Dahome and other warriors, news had it that Orona with his "Ekun" (Leopard) when he became old and wanted to show the potency of His powers entered into the ground and told his people to call upon him whenever there is problem, i.e. in times of war, by just pulling the chain attached to himself and the leopard as at the time of entering the ground.[3] This place where Orona disappeared into the ground with his Leopard today had been renovated and constructed as an emolument for lovers of history and tourists. Close to this monument is the town hall named after the honourable warrior (picture shown,) "’Orona’ Hall". the statute of Oronna and his Leopard are still there for tourists and lovers of history to see...

The Ilaro people has very rich cultural heritage. The Ilaro people are the originator of the “Bolojo“ and the “gelede” dance. The language of communication at the Gelede dances is songs known as “EFE” which is mostly composed to expose and correct ills done by people in the neighbourhood. One wouldn’t know that one is being noticed at every bad steps one took until a visit to a Bolojo dance performance or the gelede dance stand when specific songs will be composed and rendered to one’s hearing. Listen to the EFE and you will have the cause to laugh stress as well as sorrows out of your life.... The Bolojo dance are usually held at the Oronna hall or at venues for annual programmes such as the independence anniversary, children’s day celebrations etc. The Gelede dances are usually held in the market square and usually during the summer time to enable each and every one both young and old indigenes of Ilaro to participate."...
-snip-
This excerpt was reformatted for this post for better reading clarity.

****
Excerpt #2:
From http://kwekudee-tripdownmemorylane.blogspot.com/2014/08/egbado-yewa-people-artisan-textile.html
EGBADO (YEWA) PEOPLE: ARTISAN TEXTILE PROCESSING YORUBA SUB-GROUP KNOWN FOR THEIR MYSTICAL GELEDE MASQUERADE AND SECRET SOCIETY, Posted by kwekudee, August 27, 2014
"The Egbado people also now known as Yewa, are amalgamated agriculturalists and artisan textile processing Yoruboid-speaking people that forms a sub-set of the Larger Yoruba ethnic group, inhabiting the eastern area of Ogun West Senatorial District, Ogun State, in south-west Nigeria, West Africa. In 1995, the Egbado people changed their name to the Yewa, which is the name of the River Yewa that passes through their land…..

Unlike other Yoruba sub-ethnic groups that points at only Ile Ife as their original home, the Egbado people appear to have migrated from different places - possibly from the Ketu, Ile-Ife, or Oyo - to their current area early in the 18th century. Historically, Egbado people lived in the of Egbaland near River Ogun. Their name Egbado was contracted from Egbaluwe, "the wanderers towards the river- probably an allusion towards the river Yewa, which runs through their land to the lagoon at Badagr....

Gelede pays homage to the spiritual powers of women, especially elderly women known affectionately as "our mothers," awon iya wa. The powers possessed by such women, comparable to those of the gods, spirits, or ancestors, may be used for the benefit or the destruction of society. When manifesting their destructive dimension such elderly women are termed aje ("witches"). If angered, they can bring down individuals and entire communities....

The Egbado are known for developing a popular style of music, called Bolojo, in the 1970s. Their population level is uncertain, but may be around 500,000....

Egbado speaks North-West Yoruba (NWY) dialect which is also spoken by Abẹokuta, Ibadan, Ọyọ, Ogun and Lagos (Eko) areas."
-snip-
Warning- Unfortunately, the comment section of this website pages (not just this one) have been spammed with sexually explicit content.

****
Excerpt #3
From https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeynab_Habib&prev=search
Zeynab, whose real name Oloukèmi Zeynab Abibou, is a singer Benin of World music born 25 September 1975 to Abidjan in Ivory Coast . She won the trophy Kora Awards 2005 in the category best female artist of the West African and national good will ambassador for UNICEF since 2007...

Biography
Zeynab is from a family Muslim over sixteen children, she is the eighth of a father born engineer in electronics and a shopping mother."...

**
Excerpt #4
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Benin
Popular music
[list of various artists]
....Zeynab Ouloukèmi Habib, born in Abidjan [Ivory Coast to Beninese parents] in 1975, has given concerts around Africa and won a Kora Award for Best Female West African Artist in 2005. She released her first album Intori in 2001, a second album D'un endroit à l'autre in 2004, and a third album Olukèmi in 2011.[5]"
-snip-
I haven't found any online articles about King Jossy Friday, Akinna Fasca Dagama, or any other Bolojo musician. If you know of any articles please add their links in the comment section of this post. Thanks!

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THE YOUTUBE EXAMPLES OF BOLOJO MUSIC WHICH ARE SHOWCASED IN PART II OF THIS PANCOCOJAMS SERIES
Comments from Example #1
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-yNJuJgf-4
Fasco Da Gama - Aiyetoro Social Club, EgbaAlake Uploaded on Jun 24, 2011
[All of these comments are from 2011.]
1. yormeey
"@EgbaAlake, this is highlife music?"

**
Reply
EgbaAlake
"@yormeey .This is unique musical style called Bolojo,belonging distinctively to the Yewa/Egbado division of Ogun State.This particular genre was popularised by King Jossy Friday.My remote memory of Vasco Da Gama was probably in my elementry school days back in Abeokuta.Im hoping people can provide us more info on this.I also recall our extended family members coming from Imeko/Aiyetoro towns and surrounding villages coming to Abeokuta to entertain us with cool Bolojo/Efe music.Cheers Yormeey"

**
Ebenezer Oluyemi Idowu
"bolojo belongs only to egbado/yewa..populirised by jossy friday, now i am learning vasco da-gama (of obey fame )also play bolojo...(gbanja re o, e ba mi wayawo" by jossy was banned by then western gov,adebayo..i was born in igan okoto ,yewa north..bolojo was my dads favourite....interesting, could vasco be from aiyeto-7 miles from igan okoto..obey was born in igbogila...gov. adebayo killed bolojo..egbado/yewa for life"
-snip-
The word "killed" in the last sentence of this comment has the standard meaning of that word and not the high complimentary meaning that it has in contemporary African American slang.

**
planetolusola
"@EgbaAlake You've outdone yourself with this bolojo classic. Vasco Da Gama and King Jossy Friday were the biggest bolojo exponents popular in the 60's and 70's along the Egbado/Yewa axis. As a high school student at Egbado High School Igbogila of the middle 70's, I remembered sneaking out of the dorm room with friends to watch Vasco Da Gama's concert in Ilaro. Pure joy to be able to hear his music again on YT. Keep digging EgbaAlake"

****
Comments from Example #2
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Alydl-zGOys&list=PLTBBJ179RqiCNx8Tk72utSyrPrslQrwbd KING JOSSY FRIDAY - BOLOJO SPECIAL
EgbaAlake, Uploaded on Sep 11, 2011
1. EgbaAlake, 2011
"Special dedication to PLANETOLUSOLA for his relentless efforts at keeping Us all together with all the great Classics."

**
Reply
2. planetolusola, 2011
"@EgbaAlake Much thanks and appreciation for the dedication. Jossy Friday, a native of Igbogila in Ogun State is the undisputable king of Bolojo along with the legendary Vasco Da Gamma. Keep on digging my friend."

**
3. Adisa Olayinka, 2012
"EgbaAlake may God bless you, your family and the works of your hands. This is my late mother's native song as she was from Oke Odan, it brings her fond memory back, am close to tears. You're really a true Yoruba patriot, you deserve a chieftaincy title for promoting Yoruba traditional music. That atinga part reminds me of our stay in Ilaro when the atinga sect came in late 1940s picking witches and wizards. my dad used to take me to the town centre to watch the spectacles as a small boy then." 

4. keemdig, 2012
"Many thanks EgbaAlake,You really made my day, I grew up listening to this genre of music around Mushin area of lagos. Mushin then, and may be up till now, had a boisterous population of people from Oke-Ogun. I am a fan of Bolojo music, please do not relent on the good work you are doing. Efforts like yours will save our music from extinction.Thanks fella."

****
Comments from Example #3
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DnkK8VYq7HE Zeynab - Mogba Ara Da (Bolojo), Zeynab Abib, Published on Jun 22, 2012
1. dcbiglew, 2012
"Beautiful. About time to rediscover some of this awesome music. Thanks for the post. Bolojo became a bit political in the late 60's early 70's and the then governor of Lagos state banned bolojo music( imagine that) good stuff"

**
2. Debo Alder, 2012
"This is so amazing and I find it extremely difficult to believe this master piece is from a young lady; though I appreciate the homogeneity among the Yorubas and the great people of Republic of Benin. This great ‘bolojo’ piece is capable of invoking the spirit of the origin of the music in Egb
ado Land. The foremost Bolojo exponent, King Jossy Friday is still very much alive and I’m sure he will be proud of Zeynab if he comes across this music."

**
3. gracetchabi, 2012
"Rapublic of Benin and Nigeria are all the same !zeynab is a beninese artist which sings in english french yoruba fongbe ..love her..dont be surprised we have pure yoruba and nago culture in benin"

**
Boniface Dubois, 2014
"I can't stop listing to this song. My mum is from abeoukouta Nigeria. This song reminds me my childhood in abeoukouta with my grandfather. Young couples should listen more this kind of song to learn about how to manage their problems. Proud of being yoruba"

**
planetolusola, 2015
"The great Zeynab has done it again. Representing Anago/Egbado axis in this bolojo medley. True Yoruba ambassador you are."
-snip-
Read the information about Zeynab that is given in the section above.

****
Comments from Example #4
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHftxPi5BP4
ZEYNAB - BOLOJO "Medley", Zeynab Abib Published on Aug 31, 2015
1. ajedeluwasa, 2015
"I just love and appreciate this unique adaptation of Bolojo music. She is simply good. Some Ekiti/Owo musicians still sing in authentic and appealing way. But Zeynab is really very good.

**
2. Mike Emma, 2016
"This is d best Yoruba music I ever listen to in my life time. I v listened to so many but none compared to dis music. I even sing it in my sleep so captivating dat I can't get enough of it. I wish she could do more of dis traditional music bcos she is a gud dancer and singer. One day, I hope to bring her to her mother land , Land of oduduwa. More grease to ur elbow."

**
3. Ola Ogunbunmi
"Thanks for the near perfect musical presentation of yoruba cultural heritage. Thanks again for keeping our tradional music intact without western polution."

****
This concludes Part I of this series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.