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Wednesday, March 29, 2017

The Marvelows - "I Do" (information, lyrics, sound file, comments plus Samsung Active Wash Commercial)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases the 1960s Doo Wop/Soul music record "I Do" by The Marvelows.

Information about Doo Wop and Soul music are included in this post along with information about The Marvelows.

Selected comments from the discussion threads of several sound files of The Marvelow's "I Do" are also included in this post.

The Addendum to this post showcases the Samsung Active Wash commercial that features The Marvelow's "I Do" as background music.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to The Marvelows for their musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of these featured sound files on YouTube.

Thanks also to all those who are associated with the Samsung Active Wash commercial that is also featured in this post.

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INFORMATION ABOUT DOO WOP
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doo-wop
"Doo-wop is a genre of music that was developed in African-American communities of New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Baltimore, Newark, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Detroit, Washington, D.C. and Los Angeles in the 1940s, achieving mainstream popularity in the 1950s and early 1960s. Built upon vocal harmony, doo-wop was one of the most mainstream, pop-oriented R&B styles of the time. Singer Bill Kenny (1914–1978) is often called the "Godfather of Doo-wop" for his introducing the "top and bottom" format which featured a high tenor singing the lead and a bass singer reciting the lyrics in the middle of the song. Doo-wop features vocal group harmony, nonsense syllables, a simple beat, sometimes little or no instrumentation, and simple music and lyrics.

The first record to use the syllables "doo-wop" was the 1955 hit "When You Dance" by The Turbans.[2] The term "doo-wop" first appeared in print in 1961. During the late 1950s many Italian-American groups contributed a significant part in the doo-wop scene. The peak of doo-wop was in 1961. Doo-wop's influence continued in soul, pop, and rock groups of the 1960s. At various times in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, the genre has seen revivals. Doo-wop was a precursor to many of the African-American musical styles seen today. An evolution of jazz and blues, doo-wop also influenced many of the major rock and roll groups that defined the later decades of the 20th century. Doo-wop is iconic for its swing-like beats and using the off-beat to keep time. Doo-wop laid the foundation for many musical innovations, for example, R&B."

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INFORMATION ABOUT SOUL MUSIC
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soul_music
"Soul music (often referred to simply as soul) is a popular music genre that originated in the United States in the late 1950s and early 1960s. It combines elements of African-American gospel music, rhythm and blues and jazz. Soul music became popular for dancing and listening in the United States, where record labels such as Motown, Atlantic and Stax were influential during the Civil Rights Movement. Soul also became popular around the world, directly influencing rock music and the music of Africa.[1]

According to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, soul is "music that arose out of the black experience in America through the transmutation of gospel and rhythm & blues into a form of funky, secular testifying".[2] Catchy rhythms, stressed by handclaps and extemporaneous body moves, are an important feature of soul music. Other characteristics are a call and response between the lead vocalist and the chorus and an especially tense vocal sound. The style also occasionally uses improvisational additions, twirls and auxiliary sounds.[3] Soul music reflected the African-American identity and it stressed the importance of an African-American culture. The new-found African-American consciousness led to new styles of music, which boasted pride in being black.[4]

Soul music dominated the U.S. R&B chart in the 1960s, and many recordings crossed over into the pop charts in the U.S., Britain and elsewhere. By 1968, the soul music genre had begun to splinter. Some soul artists developed funk music, while other singers and groups developed slicker, more sophisticated, and in some cases more politically conscious varieties"...

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE MARVELOWS
http://www.allmusic.com/artist/the-marvelows-mn0000402637/biography Artist Biography by Ed Hogan
"The Marvelows were a Chicago soul group who scored just once, with the upbeat "I Do," a pop Top 40 hit in 1965. The group was formed in Chicago Heights, IL, when Melvin Mason met the recently relocated Paden brothers (Frank who sang bass, and Johnny who sang tenor) in the late '50s. Joined by tenor Willie (Sonny) Stephenson and Mason's wife's cousin Jesse Smith, the quintet became the Marvelows.

Smith's mother suggested that he look up a former schoolmate of hers, Johnny Pate. Pate, who had just been given the position of Midwest A&R for ABC/Paramount, secured a deal with the label and recorded four tunes for the group, the doo-wop ballad "A Friend," "My Heart," the solid mid-tempo "Hey Hey Baby," and "I Do." The latter song was only written as a warm-up song, something to sing to prepare their voices, but it hit number seven R&B and number 37 pop in the spring of 1965. Around 1966, Jesse Smith left and was replaced by Andrew Thomas. The Marvelows (now the Mighty Marvelows to avoid confusion with the West Coast group the Marvellos) had their second single (and the only other one to chart) with the ballad "In the Morning" in the spring of 1968. Other Marvelows (or the Mighty Marvelows) singles are "I'm Without a Girl," "Fade Away," "Your Little Sister" "You're Breaking My Heart," and "Wait Be Cool." ABC/Paramount issued The Mighty Marvelows LP in 1968, but the group broke up one year later. A brief reunion in 1974 was their only other time together."

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From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Marvelows
"The Marvelows were an American soul group from Chicago, formed in 1959. After contacting arranger / producer Johnny Pate, the group signed to the ABC-Paramount label, and recorded four sides: "A Friend", "My Heart", "Hey Hey Baby", and "I Do". Originally composed as a show warmup song, "I Do" was released as a single in the summer of 1965, and peaked at #7 on the R&B Singles chart and at #37 on Billboard's Hot 100.[1] It was later covered twice by The J. Geils Band, first in 1977, and again on a live album in 1982.
The group changed its name to The Mighty Marvelows in order to avoid being confused with The Marvellos

(Loma Records), after the Marvellos filed suit in 1964, and hit the charts only once more, with 1968's "In the Morning" (U.S. R&B #24).[1] A 1968 LP followed, entitled The Mighty Marvelows, but the group broke up in 1969, reuniting only once, briefly, in 1974.[2]"...

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LYRICS - I DO
(Writer(s): Jesse Smith, John Paden, Melvin Mason, Frank Paden, Willie Stephenson)

Two, one, two, three, four

Do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do
Do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do
Do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do
Do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do
Oh do I love you with all my heart
I do, I do now, yes I do

Do I want you to stay by my side
I do, I do now, yes I do

Do I want you to be all mine
I do, I do now, yes I do
And I love you my baby, yes I do
And I want you my baby
Yeah, yeah I do now

image: http://static.urx.io/units/web/urx-unit-loader.gif


Oh do I want you to stay by my side
I do, I do now, yes I do

Do I want you to be all mine
I do, I do now, yeah, yeah, I do now

Do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do
Do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do
Do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
And I love you my baby, yes I do
And I need you my baby, yes I do
Yeah, yeah, yeah baby, yeah, yeah, yeah, baby
Do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do,
Do, do, do, do, wah


Source: http://www.songlyrics.com/the-marvelows/i-do-lyrics/

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SHOWCASE SOUND FILE - The Marvelows - I do



jimmytheferret, Uploaded on Aug 8, 2009

Another jump back into the soul box for this great beaty number from Chicago band The Marvelows. Issued in the UK on HMV in 1965.

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SELECTED COMMENTS ABOUT THE MARVELOW'S RECORD 'I DO"
Here are some selected comments from __ YouTube sound files of The Marvelow's "I Do"
With the exception of comments from the source sound file which is embedded above, the other sound files are given in no particular order.

Numbers for the comments are assigned for referencing purposes only.
Source Sound File #1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tiMtoIZOq0U

1.Shana Lewis, 2009
"one of the great doo wop songs of the sixties!"

**
2. CheckMate657879, 2010
"@InuyashaPrincess14 I'm not trying to be funny, smart-a- or anything like that but this song was released in 1965 and Doo Wop had all but been killed by then. The harmony is great but it isn't "Doo Wop.""

**
3. SEVFEST, 2010
"@CheckMate657879 ... you're absolutely wrong this IS Doo Wop and if you live in the eastern USA you would know that doo wop was NOT dead at the time Just ask Jerry Blavet if you know who he is...... The Geater With The Heater"

**
4. David Dax, 2011
"Sorry, CheckMate, but this song is definitely Doo-Wop. And the J. Geils Band did it also in doo-wop style many years later. God bless doo-wop that lives on."

**
5. bill chew, 2011
"@SEVFEST Doowop wasn't dead in Philly in 1965 and has never really died with people of a certain age from there- I'm one."

**
6. Holly K, 2011
"Street corners in front of a candy store in Brooklyn New York where the guys smoked cigs, wore tight jeans, black boots and the girls wore black eye makeup, toast color lipstick and partied all night"

**
2013
7. charrmmee
"1 of th best doo wops, ever"

**
2015
8. Archiebell68, 2015
"Between Doo Wop and Soul! Perfect."

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9. Virgil Smith
"i am a master of old school if you play it i know it,west memphis ark"

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Sound File #2
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KY9FyR-vUFI

1. gumpsmomma, 2015
"Huge Stomp record in Philly. You were spent after this one ended. But we stayed on the dance floor and danced for 4 hours solid every Friday night, Saturday night and Sunday afternoon at venues like Chev Vous, Concord Ballroom, Wagners, Boulevard Pools, Riviera Ballroom in NJ, Edgely Fire Hall in Bristol, and in Wildwood; at the Starlight Ballroom during the summer time. Danced everyday or night for my entire middle school and high school years. Miss those days, but the memories remain, and I still spin the music everyday."
-snip-
"Philly" = Philadelphia

"Stomp records" means "records to dance to" 

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2. timelessly1, 2015
"When I first heard this song, I knew I'd heard it before. It was covered by the J. Geils Band in the early '80s. Both versions were great, but I really like this one better."

**
3. bunny fish, 2015
"Classic soul from 1965"

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4. luane acevedo, 2015
"Does anyone in my Jackson high school class remember a group of us marching in a conga line singing The Marvelows' I Do DO DO song down the Hall and into the principal's office. He stood up by his desk, his jaw dropped and we just kept the conga line leaving his office and back to class. "Funny like always, Acevedo," he said. I wonder if he was being sarcastic. I know Richie Zimmerman R.I.P. who was so shy was dragged into the caper and kept complaining to let him go because we were going to get him in trouble. he would tend to end his statements with "you guys..." I think Sam Berkowitz was one whose idea it was. The usual list of suspects. I'm not sure Ken Warner joined us. He would have been too cool for such a childish stunt."

**
Reply
5. Milton Oliver, 2015
"+luane acevedo, was this Andrew Jackson High School in Cambria Heights, Queens, New York ? This was a very popular song back then in NYC."

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6. Lolita Johnson, 2015
The song to the samsung active wash commercial I finally found it

**
7. buckladin/buckyboone, 2015
"Samsung brought me here lol I love this song had to find it"

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Sound File #3:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbNK7FMl7rs

1. boomerang905, 2011
"This group got lost in a time warp. Music was changing when they came out, going in another Popish sound rather than DooWops which is what I grew up loving. But they were exceptional and I still listened to them because they really did sound great!" 

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2. Fred Calvello, 2013
"We did the Bristol stomp to this in philly"

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3. JIM PORTER, 2013
"LOVE THIS TUNE REMEMBER DANCIN THE "TAP" AT THE LUBS IN BOSTON BACK IN THE DAY"
-snip-
"The Tap" = tap dancing

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Sound File #4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrAJ7UDEHtw

Bob Resner, 2010
"This song rocks it don't get any better than this"

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tippimail1, 2014
"Who is in this backup band?"

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Reply
BPJT666, 2017
"Johnny Pate was the arranger so it was a bunch of Chicago studio guys. Not sure who."

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gumpsmomma, 2015
"One of the best Stomp records that we danced yo in Philly. Huge hit in that region."
-snip-
In Philly (Philadelphia), particularly among African Americans and Italian Americans, the word "yo" was often used from at least the 1960s to date sometimes meaning "hey" and sometimes as a filler without any literal meaning. https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071221185615AAzGTI4

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ADDENDUM - Activewash Samsung Commercial 2015 at Appliancesconnection.com



appliancesconnection, Published on Mar 30, 2016

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Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Magic System (Ivory Coast Band) - Premier Gauo (1er Gauo) Video & Comments

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part pancocojams series on the song "1er Gaou" (also known as Premier Gaou") by Cote d Ivorian group Magic System.

Part II presents the same video of "1er Gaou" that was showcased in Part I and presents selected comments from that video's YouTube discussion thread.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/03/magic-system-cote-divoire-band-1er-gaou.html for Part I of this series. Part I presents information about the Ivorian Creole language "Nouchi", the language that is used for this song. This post also provides information about the song "1er Gaou" and showcases a video of that song. The Nouchi lyrics for "ier Gaou"' are included in this post along with their English translation.

The content of this post is presented for socio-cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Magic Systems for their musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video and this sound file on YouTube.

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INFORMATION ABOUT "1er GAOU" ("PREMIER GAOU")
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1er_Gaou
" "1er Gaou" is a song by Ivorian Zouglou artists Magic System, taken from the album of the same name. The title literally means "First Fool" in Ivorian slang. The song contains an autobiographical account of lead singer Salif "A'Salfo" Traoré about his ex-girlfriend who tried to hook up with him again when he became famous. Originally recorded in 1999, it became smash indie hit in France three years later. The song meant the breakthrough of little-known Magic System.

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SHOWCASE VIDEO: Magic System - Premiere Gaou



ahnd Uploaded on Dec 17, 2006

music video
-snip-
There are other several videos and sound files of this song on YouTube. Most of the comments in some of those discussion threads are in French.

Here are selected comments from this video's discussion thread that focus on the song "Premier Gauo" and this video. Numbers are assigned for referencing purposes only.

2010
1. mikaylarosa
"i love dis song!! dey play it everywhere..from the caribbean to the Afrcan countries.."

**
2. M. Stroud
"The dance they hit at 3:00 and 3:06 is HOT! It's like the best moves you can hit for this type of music."

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3. AALBEREZANCHI
"would really like a translation of what they are saying. what language is it ?"

**
Reply
4. Colombe D6
"@AALBEREZANCHI

du dioula et noushi (argot ivoirien)"
-snip-
Google translate from French to English:
"Of dioula and noushi (Ivorian slang)"

****
2011
5. Ruthhxo
"Once you hear this song at an african party, EVERYBODYS on the dancefloor. Lls #TeamAfrican"

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6. Andy Gussie
"I like this song it takes me back 11 years. It brings back so much good memories. We played this allot in the Caribbean islands, especially the French ones."

**
7. ifebarbz07
"Love this tune, played at my wedding 7 years ago, but only the parents knew what the name was!! Love it, such a classic tune!!"

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8. AmyGrl595
"it's not a true african party if this song is not played (:"

**
9. muffinpookieful
"oh my lawd, the memories from this song. haha, good times man."

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10. Kpopluvr94
"this and MY MOTHA SWEET MOTHA are the african party jams."

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2012
11. Ivory King
"this song is from la cote d'ivoire(Ivory coast) its not nigerian"

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12. rotawo
"we know we are just showing how much Nigerians love the song"

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13. Adaobi M. Okonkwo
"IF THEY DONT PLAY THIS JAM, THE JOLLOF WILL NOT DIGEST PROPER!!"

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14. Dai Z
"It's about an aspiring artist whose girlfriend left him because he was broke. after his hard work finally pays off, she wants him back. He knows that he was not a gaou (a foolish man) the first time by letting her go, but if he takes her back now, he will be a gaou.."

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15. Dai Z
"It's French with Ivorian "slang" (for lack of a better word)..."

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Reply
16. rianna richards
"Its not in french..."

**
Reply
17. S.E.M Asantehene
"Not really, its mix of Ivorian languages, slang and french :P"

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18. Africanbomba
"How to spot an African in a crowd: Play this song and watch for the headbobs and smiles. This is def one of the greatest African tunes.....from Ghana with love :)"

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19. warsaminho
"At 1:06 you see a young Booba entering the club :-). Footballer Olivier Kapo also in the clip !!"
-snip-
Booba - a French rapper of African descent; "footballer" = [American term] soccer player

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2013
20. Elijah Smith
"He's talking about this woman Antou. They were together but she left him when he ran out of money and got with someone else. Then he breaks through, she comes back to him and then finally leaves her. The chorus is saying something to the effect of "fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me""

**
21. NappyHappyDrumMajor
"THIS SONG GOOO HARD IN DA PARTIES!!!!"

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2014
22. Sonny Higham
"African Song Hall of Fame right here"

**
23. Jasmine Mutunga
"I'm from kenya and when I was a kid I would hear this song at every wedding, fundraiser, party, etc and since I didn't know swahili I always just assumed they were just singing in swahili lol. such a nice song... brings back so many childhood memories... much love. x"

**
24. Zuri Ten
"Dare I say ...best African pop song loved all over the continent and even half the people have no idea what its about....."

**
25. Siyomnqoba Xolo
"A house version of this track was famous in South Africa about 12 years ago"

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26. Mokgatla Molepo, 2016
"I first heard this song on Dj Oskido (South Africa) album more than 14 years ago"

**
27. MsPrincessaj
"Wow. When I was in South Africa ten years ago, I bought a dj Oskido CD and shared it with my friends back in Washington, DC"

**
28. Zabu Ramafikeng, 2017
"This is the kind of ish that makes me african......... Oskido had a remix of this song on Oskido's church grooves the 2nd commandment its out of this world...... All the love from south africa...."
-snip-
For the sake of continuity, I put these three comments after the comment about "Premier Gaou" being included in a South African house music album.

**
29. Larissa
"No matter where you're from in Africa, this song is a household song. I'm Zambian and this song is played at every function. I love it."

**
30. FranandSofia
"Just to make it clear this song is an Ivorian song (from Ivory Coast, also known as Côte d'Ivoire). This song is not from Nigeria, Congo, Cameroon, and or Ghana. I know this because my mother is from there, and also all the group members are from there."

**
Reply
31. KingEvoTheDon
"Why does it matter?, if you're African and you enjoy the song just enjoy the song. No disrepct"

**
32. oppqt1, 2015
"+FranandSofia I join everybody else with the same comment, does it matter? Not at all. This song is waaaaaaaaaaaay above these type of divisive sh&t*. It's an African son[g], as an African, love it and proud of the work done by Magic System. Thanks and congrats forever..."
-snip-
*This word is fully spelled out in this comment.

**
33. Chocolate Sauce
"I'm of Nigerian descent, I don't even understand the words to the song.. But since it's played constantly at African parties I have grown fond of it."

**
Reply
34. jiggar22
"This guys are from Abidjan, from ivory coast but this song was a big hit here in Lagos, Nigeria."

**
Reply
35. stomy bugsy
"+Chocolate Sauce they're speaking French this song came out in France in 1999"

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Reply
36. stomy bugsy
"You're welcome my friend, i grew up listening to this song in France. It was very popular."

**
Reply
37. Corey Noll
"+stomy bugsy
they're speaking nouchi"

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2015
38. Nomai B
"If you go to an African party and they don't play this song. Go home! Just take your jollof and go home!😂😂😹"

**
Reply
39. Hyacinth Bucket, 2016
"+Nomai B lol this group is very famous in France,they have a hit every summer"

**
40. Fadjy Valentin
"When I was younger, I heard this at every Haitian party and I've been looking for this song forever and today I came across it. Almost cried"

**
Reply
41. riku marcelin
"+Fadjy Valentin Bruh I heard this everywhere in Haiti!"

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2016
42. MsPrincessaj
"Sak passé! I lived in Washington, DC when this song came out a they played it at all the African parties. It wasn't until I took a trip to Haiti almost a year after it came out, that I heard it through my hotel window in Petionville one Friday night. I jumped out the bed and started dancing!! Big up to Haiti and the African Diaspora!!"
-snip-
Here's an entry about "sak passe" from
"sak pase
creole(haitian)4 what's happenin.
1st person:sak pase
2nd: map boule(i'm good)"

by christine February 18, 2004

**
43. Psynames Synames
"i dont understand or a word said in this song but i love it. and i dance to it to the fullest kkkk"
-snip-
"kkk" = internet symbols for laughter in Brazil

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2017
44. Its Ripzz
"im from Mauritius small african island and this was my childhood im 17 now"

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45. simba sakuhuni
"hahahaha ah I don't even comprehend wat u singing, but we danced to this zimbabwe in the late 90s"

**
46. KordeiNation
"EVERY African knows this song no matter east or west"

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This concludes Part II of this two part pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Magic System (Cote D'Ivoire Band) - "1er Gaou" (Premier Gaou) Video & Lyrics

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a two part pancocojams series on the song "1er Gaou" (also known as Premier Gaou") by Cote d Ivorian group Magic System.

Part I presents information about the Ivorian Creole language "Nouchi", the language that is used for this song. This post also provides information about the song "1er Gaou" and showcases a video of that song. The Nouchi lyrics for "ier Gaou"' are included in this post along with their English translation.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/03/magic-system-ivory-coast-band-premier.html for Part II presents the same video of "1er Gaou" that was showcased in Part I and presents selected comments from that video's YouTube discussion thread.

The content of this post is presented for socio-cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Magic Systems for their musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of this video on YouTube.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT NOUCHI (LANGUAGE)
Excerpt #1:
From https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nouchi&prev=search Nouchi [translated from French to English and given in this post "as is" with no attempt to change the translation to standard English.]

"Nouchi (or Noussi) is a form of slang present in Ivory Coast and West Africa .

Origin
The nouchi (or noussi) is a mixture of French and several languages of Cote d'Ivoire , it appeared in the early 1980s 1 . It was originally spoken by young city dwellers who were ill-educated or delinquent, who did not have a good command of the French language . The Nouchi was practiced by them especially near markets, stations, cinemas before being carried in most social strata. The language of the little thugs, the Nouchi became the language of the Ivorian popular comedy, even of the Ivorian music . It is also the language of the "debrouille" in the poor districts of Abidjan . " Nou " in malinké means "the nose", while " chi " means hair. This gives in a word, "hair of nose" therefore "mustache" to designate the villain, to whom everyone wanted to resemble. A " nouchi " is a strong man (notably a Mexican bandit leader of the westerns who is often a mustachio), feared by all and fearful of nothing and nobody. The nouchi was popularized especially by the song Premier gaou of the group Magic System 3 .

Description
The nouchi was born in Côte d'Ivoire , but it is not known who owns the paternity. This language feeds on the many dialects of the country and French . The speakers of this language are called "nouchis".
Nevertheless, the nouchi differs from the familiar language in Côte d'Ivoire. For the familiar language, the sentences will be devoid of their articles, and adverbs like "there" punctuate the end of sentence.
Many terms of the nouchi aim to evoke social phenomena specific to the Ivory Coast...

Construction of sentences
Nouchi is a language that is based on short sentences or additions of terms drawn from the experience of the street, English, French and Ivorian ethnic groups or even those of the West African subregion. However, there are expressions specific to nouchis and ziguéhis (the bad-boys of the Abidjan ghettos)...
Some terms are sometimes used in a pejorative way, such as "gaou", "gnata", "albert" and "brézo". The gaou is the naive person, his state is less serious than that of gnata. The latter presents a difficulty of adaptation. The "albert" or the "brézo" is the one that persists in the maladjustment. The formation of expressions is unlimited and develops according to happy or unhappy events. It is a language in full expansion in Côte d'Ivoire, which inspires and is inspired by popular culture...

Origin of expressions
Strongly based on French, he uses English and Spanish words 4 , inserted by the pupils, with words from almost all the languages ​​spoken in Côte d'Ivoire. However, Malinké and Baoulé 5 , the most widely represented ethnic groups in the markets and popular squares, are highly dominant.

The nouchi also has the particularity to vary according to the environment and evolve very quickly, taking inspiration from current events."...
-snip-
This page includes a list of Nouchi words.

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Excerpt #2:
From http://www.lingref.com/cpp/acal/44/paper3142.pdf "Nouchi as a Distinct Language: The Morphological Evidence" by Hannah Sande

"Introduction
In this paper I argue that Nouchi, a relatively young Ivoirian contact variety, is and should be treated as a full-fledged language distinct from French and its other source languages. Nouchi, an emerging language spoken in Côte d’Ivoire since that late 1970’s (Ayewa 2005), has been treated in the literature as a slang vocabulary or an urban youth dialect of French. Though Nouchi began as a lingua franca among uneducated youth in urban centers, it is now the preferred language of Ivoirians in Abidjan and the surrounding areas of Côte d’Ivoire (Kube-Barth 2009). This paper focuses on morphological properties of Nouchi, which demonstrate that Nouchi is a full-fledged language with a grammar distinct from its source languages...

2. Background of Nouchi
Nouchi is a contact language that emerged on the streets of urban Côte d’Ivoire between the late 1970’s and early 1980’s. It began as the lingua franca of uneducated, unemployed youth, though it quickly gained status as the language of Ivoirian identity (Kouadio 2005; Kube 2004; Newell 2009). Abidjan and the other urban areas of Côte d’Ivoire are centers of language contact, home to over 66 different languages. While most of the languages spoken in the area are linked with a local ethnic identity, Nouchi is not specific to a given ethnic group. Due to its ethnic neutrality and daily use, first by urban youth, Nouchi has spread rapidly (Kouadio 2005). It is the language most frequently used in the Ivoirian Zouglou style of music, and it has been promoted online through dictionaries, satirical news sites, and chat rooms.

Though Nouchi began as an urban youth language (Kiessling and Mous 2004), it is now the preferred language of 10-30 year olds in Abidjan, and is commonly spoken by Ivoirains of all ages (Ayewa 2005). This statistic is particularly significant because 66 percent of Abidjan’s population is under 25 years old (Kouadio 2005). Though most children in Abidjan grow up speaking more than one language in the home, Kube-Barth (2009) and Kouadio (2005) call Nouchi the native language of the current generation of urban Ivoirians." ...
-snip-
According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coup%C3%A9-D%C3%A9cal%C3%A9 , the words "Coupé-Décalé" come from the Nouchi language:
"Coupé-Décalé is a type of popular dance music originating from Côte d'Ivoire and the Ivorian diaspora in Paris, France. Drawing heavily from Zouglou and Zouk with African influences, Coupé-Décalé is a very percussive style featuring African samples, deep bass, and repetitive minimalist arrangements.

History
While Coupé-Décalé is known as Côte d'Ivoire's definitive pop music, it actually began in Paris, created by a group of Ivorian DJs at the Atlantis, an African nightclub in northeast Paris.[1][2] These Djs, known as the 'Jet Set', became popular for their flamboyant style, often showing up at the club with large amounts of cash which they would hand out to audiences on the dance floor. Their aesthetic defined the early sounds of Coupé Décalé, apparent in the genre's name. In Nouchi (Ivorian slang), Coupé means "to cheat" and Décalé means to "run away", so Coupé-Décalé basically means to cheat somebody and run away.[1] The 'somebody' cheated is generally interpreted to mean France or the West/Europe, finding parallels to the idea of "The Man" in American culture. Especially in the beginning, the songs often celebrated those who had used guile to 'make it' abroad."
-snip-
I added italics added to highlight that sentence.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SONG "1er GAOU" (PREMIER GAOU")
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1er_Gaou
" "1er Gaou" is a song by Ivorian Zouglou artists Magic System, taken from the album of the same name. The title literally means "First Fool" in Ivorian slang. The song contains an autobiographical account of lead singer Salif "A'Salfo" Traoré about his ex-girlfriend who tried to hook up with him again when he became famous. Originally recorded in 1999, it became smash indie hit in France three years later. The song meant the breakthrough of little-known Magic System.

Background

"1er Gaou" is based on autobiographical experiences of lead singer Salif "A'Salfo" Traoré. When he was an aspiring, poor artist, his girlfriend left him, but when he became a celebrity with Magic System, she tried to win him back, but Traoré turned her down.[1] The song was first released in 1999 in their native Abidjan and was at first a hit in Côte d'Ivoire and other African countries only. But when it was remixed in 2002 and released in France for Mélina Forthin, Magic System's song became a major indie hit.

Lyrics
[...]

The lyrics feature a colorful patois of French-Ivorian slang. This is especially evident in the refrain of "Et on dit premier gaou n'est pas gaou oh / C'est deuxième gaou qui est niata oh ah" ("They say that the first fool is not a fool / It is the second fool who is a fool"), which expresses that his first folly (her leaving him) is not really a folly at all, only accepting her back would be.

Chart performances

The single topped at number four on the French charts and remained in the top 100 for 28 weeks, ten of them in the top ten[2] and sold as many as 300,000 copies in France. …
The single was also a top ten hit in Belgium (Wallonia), peaked at number ten in it ninth week, and appeared in the top 40 for 15 weeks.[4] In Switzerland, the single had a moderate success, peaking at number 30 and staying in the top 100 for nine weeks.[5]"...
-snip-
No mention is made in this Wikipedia page about how how very popular "1er Goaou" has been and still is throughout Africa,and throughout the French speaking Caribbean, and other parts of the world, especially where [20th century and 21st century] African immigrants live. That popularity is documented by commenters in the YouTube discussion threads of that song. Selected examples of those comments are highlighted in Part II of this pancocojams series.

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: Magic System - Premiere Gaou



ahnd Uploaded on Dec 17, 2006

music video

****
LYRICS - 1er GAOU*
(Magic System)

C'est dans ma galère que la go
Antou m'a quitté oh ah
{x4}

Quand j'avais un peu
Matin midi soir
On été ensemble
A la rue Princesse
Aux mille maquis
Santos payait les poulets
L'argent est fini
Antou a changé de côté
Wari ban nan
Elle a changé de copain

Nan guin nan wan, nan guin nan wan
Nan guin nan wan, nan guin nan wan

Dieu merci pour moi je savais chanter un peu
J'ai fait ma cassette oh on me voit à la télé
Matin midi soir c'est moi je chante à la radio
Antou a vu çà elle dit le gaou a percé
Attends je vais partir le couper

{Refrain:}
Et on dit premier gaou n'est pas gaou oh
C'est deuxième gaou qui est niata oh ah
Et on dit premier gaou n'est pas gaou oh
C'est deuxième gaou qui est niata oh ah

Dimanche matin koko on frappe à ma porte
A ma grande surprise c'est la go Antou je vois
On s embrasse j'ai dit y'a longtemps qu'on c'est plus revu
Elle veut me mentir Elle dit chéri j'avais voyagé
Je suis de retour
Je t'appartiens
Prends-moi cadeau, fais ce que tu veux

{au Refrain}

J'ai dit chéri koko qu'est ce que tu veux manger
Sans même hésiter Elle me dit poulet braisé

J'ai dit chéri koko c'est poulet tu veux manger
Poulet est trop petit çà peut pas te rassasier
C'est caïman braisé, je vais te donner
Kedjenou d'éléphant, tu vas manger

Nan guin nan wan, nan guin nan wan

Elle est fâché Elle dit elle s'en va à la maison
Si elle va à la maison population va me tuer
Je lui ai demandé pardon, elle a accepté
A un moment donné, elle a tout gâté
Elle est quitté dans poulet, elle s'en va dans aloco
Si c'est aloco c'est pas compliqué
C'est plantation de bananes
Tu vas griller
Au lieu de fourchette, ça peut pas bien piquer
C'est avec râteau, tu vas manger oh"

Source: https://genius.com/Magic-system-premier-gaou-lyrics

****
1er GAOU (PREMIER GAOU) [English translation with notes]

"it's when i was down that the gal Antou left me oh ah {x4}

when i had little(money)
morning noon evening
we were together
at the "Rue Princesse" ( famous Abidjan bar)
at the "Mille Maquis" (famous Abidjan bar)
together at the""inaudible" oh (famous abidjan bar)
when the money was gone
Antou changed side
wari bana (means "no more money" in african dialect)
she changed boyfriend

na gnere na gnere wa, na gnere na gnere wah (means you are crazy in african dialect)

thank god for me, i knew how to sing a little
i did my demo tape, people saw me on TV
morning noon evening its me singing on radio
Antou saw that and said the fool made it (GAOU means FOOL in slang)
wait, let me go and take his money (like scam him)

{Refrain:}
and we say first fool is not a fool
its the second fool who is the real fool
and we say first fool is not a fool
its the second fool who is the real fool
(african verison of "fool me once shame on you,fool me twice shame on me"

sunday morning knock knock someone's knocking at my door
to my great surprise it's the gal Antou i see
jokingly i say its been a while we've seen each other
(wrong translation on your original he says "EN SEMBLANT" not "ON S'EMBRASSE")
she wants to lie to me she says darling i had traveled
i am back
i belong to you
take me as a gift and do what you want with me

{au Refrain}

i say sweet darling what do you want to eat
without hesitation she says barbecued chicken
when we say first fool is not a fool
its the second fool who is the real fool
i say sweet darling, its chicken you want to eat
chicken is too small and wont satisfy you
its barbecued cayman i will give you
"kedjenou" of elephant you are going to eat (kedjenou is an african dish)

na gnere na gnere wah, na gnere na gnere wah

she is upset and says she is going home
if she goes home, horniness is going to kill me
(coagulation means like coagulated sperm for lack of sex)
i ask for her forgiveness and she accepted
then at one point, she messed it all up
she stop asking for chicken and now wants alloco (alloco its an african fried plantain dish)
if its alloco,its not complicated
its a banana plantation
that you are going to fry
instead of a fork
that cant fill you up
its with a rake that you are going to eat
na gnere na gnere wa, na gnere na gnere wah
{au Refrain}

Kader fool oh ah
Blé go fool oh ah
Soro guillaume fool oh ah
Sabine yo so fool oh ah
Angelo fool oh ah
Hotorino fool oh ah
Blé niata oh ah
Dieu fit niata oh ah
Kader niata oh ah
Kader tu m'a niata oh ah
Blé niata oh ah
Michel is a fool oh ah
Emile is a fool oh ah

Honoré fool oh ah
i sAy you dance ah oh ah
look at your stuff oh ah
i say you dance ah oh ah

Nan guin nan wan, nan guin nan wan
Oh youdance ah oh ah

{au Refrain}"


Submitted by blackstar18 on Tue, 06/04/2010 - 06:49

Author's [blackstar18]'s comments:
"i am French but lived in Ivory coast where Magic System comes from and i can see that there are many mistakes on the original French lyrics that you have uploaded. also this song cannot be translated word for words as it would make no sense because most of the words are african slang so i translated into what it really meant instead."

Source: http://lyricstranslate.com/en/premier-gaou-premier-gaou.html-0

Links to three other English translations and at least one French translation are on that page.

****
This concludes Part I of this two part pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Three Videos Of Cote d'Ivoire's Coupé Décalé Dancing (With Information About Coupé Décalé)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about Cote d'Ivoire's Coupé Décalé music and dance and showcases three videos of Coupé décalé dancing.

Selected comments from the discussion threads of these YouTube videos are also included in this post.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are featured in these videos and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT COUPE DECALE
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coup%C3%A9-D%C3%A9cal%C3%A9
"Coupé-Décalé is a type of popular dance music originating from Côte d'Ivoire and the Ivorian diaspora in Paris, France. Drawing heavily from Zouglou and Zouk with African influences, Coupé-Décalé is a very percussive style featuring African samples, deep bass, and repetitive minimalist arrangements.

History
While Coupé-Décalé is known as Côte d'Ivoire's definitive pop music, it actually began in Paris, created by a group of Ivorian DJs at the Atlantis, an African nightclub in northeast Paris.[1][2] These Djs, known as the 'Jet Set', became popular for their flamboyant style, often showing up at the club with large amounts of cash which they would hand out to audiences on the dance floor. Their aesthetic defined the early sounds of Coupé Décalé, apparent in the genre's name. In Nouchi (Ivorian slang), Coupé means "to cheat" and Décalé means to "run away", so Coupé-Décalé basically means to cheat somebody and run away.[1] The 'somebody' cheated is generally interpreted to mean France or the West/Europe, finding parallels to the idea of "The Man" in American culture. Especially in the beginning, the songs often celebrated those who had used guile to 'make it' abroad.

The genre's first hit, "Sagacité" was pioneered by the late Stephane Doukouré (a.k.a. "Douk-Saga"), a member of the 'Jet Set', during the post-2002 militaro-political crisis in Côte d'Ivoire. The hit became a success in African clubs in Paris and spread quickly among disc jockeys in Côte d'Ivoire. According to Siddhartha Mitter of Afropop,
"[Coupé-Décalé ] has become very popular at a time of conflict; in fact, Ivorian music has really for the first time taken over dance floors all over Africa at exactly the same time that Ivory Coast, the country, has been going through this protracted political and military crisis, with debilitating social and economic effects".

Although arising from this time of political turmoil, Coupé-Décalé lyrically addresses topics such as relationships, earning money and maintaining a good mood or 'bonne ambiance'. Much of its lyrics refer to specific dance moves, often referencing current events such as the avian flu dance[3] or Guantanamo (with hand movements imitating hands raised in chains).[4] These global themes could have helped to make Coupé-Décalé so deeply popular across a politically divided Côte d'Ivoire and spread its influence so far across Africa and the diaspora. Increasingly non-Ivorian artists, particularly in the Congo, are beginning to play and incorporate the musical style."...

****
SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Example #1: coupé-décalé aladji



Boris Jobs Uploaded on Oct 27, 2006

Superbe coupé décalé
-snip-
Here are selected comments from this video's discussion thread. The comments are numbered for referencing purposes only.

2014
1. S5TM Upsuh
"1 of my favourite songs!! But the thing that pisses me off is that people dnt know where it's from. Noo it's not Nigerian!!! They speak French in parts of the song! It's from Ivory Coast! Cote D'Ivoire!"

**
2. Aubain Adi
"This song is from Cote d'Ivoire dude. singer name Jeff BogoloBango song: Alladji. I enjoyed it the time I was playing DJ in clubs in CIV"

**
Reply
3. S5TM Upsuh
"+Aubain Adi I feel sorry that nobody knows that Jeff bogolobango actually made this song but everybody thinks it's this silly ramatoulaye guy"

**
4. Galaxy Productions
"I think it's from Ghana or Ivory Coast"

**
Reply
5. S5TM Upsuh, 2016
"+Galaxy Productions where do u even get ghana from? they don't even speak twi or any ghana language in this"
-snip-
As "Twi" is a Ghanaian language, this corrected comment is "or any [other] Ghanaian language...

**
6. Gissela Moya
"very similar to punta from Honduras:) love it!"

**
Reply
7. Carter Curtis, 2016
"Gissela Moya yes"

**
8. afro izzy
"This song is in HALL OF FAME"

**
9.HammadiLobbongel
"Ca c'est la vrai decale-coupe quoi."
-snip-
Google translate from French to English:
"That's the real [coupe] decale" [Google translate gives "coupe" as "Cut shifted".
However, note that the Wikipedia page on this music/dance indicates that those two words aren't French but "Nouchi (Ivorian slang). The authors of that page indicate that in Nouchi "Coupé means "to cheat" and Décalé means to "run away", so Coupé-Décalé basically means to cheat somebody and run away. The 'somebody' cheated is generally interpreted to mean France or the West/Europe, finding parallels to the idea of "The Man" in American culture." Some information about Nouchi is given below in the comment section for this pancocojams post.

**
10. Tracey Mauricé
"Now this is THE REAL Coupé Decalé."

****
2016
11. pour la musique
"c'est pas Dj ramatoulay qui chante ça,c'est plutôt Dj jeff bogolobango.."
-snip-
Google translate from French to English
"It is not Dj ramatoulay who sings this, it is rather Dj jeff bogolobango .."

**
12. Eunice Doe
"wow !! wen coupe was the bomb..now it's mostly Naija music now,everything has time.one Love Africa n God bless"
-snip-
"The bomb" = African American Vernacular English with the same meaning as "hot" [very popular; the very best]

****
Example #2: Coupé décalé



blakdes Uploaded on Nov 3, 2009

Congolese Coup e decale dancers
-snip-
A number of commenters corrected the summary statement saying that these dancers were Ivorian and not Congolese.

Here are selected comments from this video's discussion thread. The comments are numbered for referencing purposes only.

2011
1. Stundtals
"coupe decalé music, kuduro dancing"
-snip-
A pancocojams post on Angola's kuduro dancing will be published ASAP and its link will be added to this post.

**
Reply
2. Efe Bah
"@Stundtals wat is kuduro dancing this is coupe decale dancing or ndombolo"

Ojokernegro5 years ago
It's really different from watching kuduro dancers do their thing (even the beat is different), but when I watched this video I felt the exact same feeling amazement and pride.
This is video is BOSS!! :)

Much love from Angola

**
3. DJ Zobe
"damn what is that beat name?"

**
Reply
4. kindomofghana
"@Shamoneyxs Its a type of music & dance style, which originated in the Ivory Coast (West Africa). It spread fast to other parts of west & central africa, then to france & belgium through african immigrants & to some parts of the francophone caribbean countries."

****
2012
5. murrth
"This dope! Looks great, great vibe, and I love the track too...
Anyone know the title of the song, or some way I can track it down?"

**
Reply
6. Frenchy Graham
"the song is couper decaler by zaza twins"

**
7. Nathan Nselala4 years ago
that is how we conolase people roll

**
8. Patrick Romuald Koffi Alla
"No Yayar101, they r all Ivorians tha live in France I knw some of them"

**
9. Lee B
"erm they're IVORIANS NOT CONGOLESE THANKS...."

**
Reply
10. Nefritara
"What is the difference? I'm not being a smart ass, just trying to learn."

**
Reply
11. Lee B
"The difference is
1. coupe decale is for ivorians not congolese people because ivory coast is where coupe decale comes from
2. the dancers are ivorian not congolese and that's the difference"

**
Reply
12. Lee B
"Nah Sorry there isnt 1 single ivorian song in lingala PLS ! why the hell would we want to sing in your language anyways we dance to your music as much as you dance to ours but to say that couper decaler sing in lingala thats not true at all theres nothing wrong with congolese liking our music cause we love their music too the dancers are ivorian because my cousin knows them only one of the boy is congolese the rest of then even the girls are from ivory coast (:"

****
Example #3: [COUPE DECALE 2011] OUDY 1ER-ADOKAFLE Yougou Yougou



MrVINCENZO225, Uploaded on Aug 30, 2011
-snip-
Here are selected comments from this video's discussion thread. The comments are numbered for referencing purposes only.

2011
1. Destiney Lion
"they kilt it!!"
-snip-
"Kilt it: (killed it) is a African American Vernacular English phrase meaning "[doing something] exceptionally well".

**
2. goldennella
"@marza1134 etant congolaise, je trouve que les ivorienne danse bien ausi maintenant avant je trouvai que c'etait juste nous!!"
-snip-
Google translate from French to English:
"Marza1134 being Congolese, I think the Ivorian dance well before now I found it was just us !!"
-snip-
My translation of that comment into standard English:
"Marza1134 being Congolese, I think the Ivorian dance well. Before this [before i saw this] I thought it was just us [Congolese who danced well]!


**
2012
[The following comment was written in response to some commenters bickering about which African nation is culturally the best.]

3. Ineka Gbê
"Héé vraiment les commentaires me font rire quoi! "C'est des pas congolais!", "Ivoirien a copier" "Non c'est des pas ivoiriens" (en gros se sont des commentaires de ce genre)et bla bla bla! Avec tous ça là comment l'Afrique va avancé! Ivoirien ô, Congolais ô, c'est pas la même Afrique là?? Vraiment yako pour l'Afrique hein! Quand est-ce qu'on va avancer franchement et apprécier nos richesses culturelles (musique, danse etc) sans se diviser??

Bref bravo les filles! vous gérer!
-snip-
Google translate from French to English
"Hey really comments make me laugh what! "It's Congolese steps!", "Ivorian to copy" "No it's Ivorian steps" (basically have comments like this) and blah blah blah! With all this there how Africa is advanced! Ivorian ô, Congolais ô, it is not the same Africa there ?? Really yako for Africa eh! When will we go forward frankly and appreciate our cultural richness (music, dance etc) without dividing ??

Short bravo the girls! You manage!"
-snip-
"Short bravo the girls! You manage" is probably something like "In brief, Bravo (Congratulations) girls. You rock!"

**
[Here's a similar comment in 2013 from that same commenter]:

4. Ineka Gbê
"En quoi dire que les africains doivent s'unir et apprécier les richesses culturelles multiples et diverses de chacun (mais qui sont aussi souvent les mêmes) et donc se respecter pour pouvoir mieux avancer ensemble, est "nul"?"
-snip-
Google translate from French to English:
"How can we say that Africans must unite and appreciate the multiple and diverse cultural riches of each individual (but who are often the same) and thus respect each other in order to be able to advance together, is "null"?
-snip-
My suggested translation: instead of "is null" = "is nothing"

**
2013
5. Efe Bah
"The artist and the dancers are from Guinea thou...but u are right they are doing coupe decale which the ivory coast is known for"

**
6. Shantal Joy
"These galz are fire!!!"

**
7. Angel Devine
"Im Ghanaian but I've got to admit, if it wasn't for azonto we wouldn't have anything on you Ivorians when it comes to dancing! Smh"

**
8. 11rainyday
"good dancing. i LOVE their swagg."
-snip-
"Swagg"- an African American Vernacular English term that is a clip of the word "swagger", meaning their self-confidence and their "style" (their "hipness")

**
9.Thunder cocolove
"I do not know why the congolai are always jealous of Ivorian ...."

****
2014
10. Gedheon
"et les américains découvrent le Twerk ^^'
-snip-
Google translate from French to English:
"And the Americans discover the Twerk ^^ "

****
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