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Tuesday, October 28, 2014

I've Started A New Blog - Cocojams2

Edited by Azizi Powell

For some reason, my cultural webssite cocojams.com is inaccessible. That website was launched in 2001 and has (had?) a TON of material on English language playground rhymes, singing game, and cheers. In addition, Cocojams.com also featured (?) examples of civil rights songs, 19th century African American dance songs, fraternity and sorority cheers, stomp and shake cheerleading cheers, and a whole lot more.

I admit to panicking yesterday morning when I tried to visit cocojams.com and got the message that "Sorry, We could not find cocojams.com. It may be unavailable or may not exist."

And then I really panicked when I couldn't reach cocojams.com's the internet hosting company (which isn't affiliated with Google blogspot). But I calmed down somewhat when I remembered that I have some [but not all] back-up files of those pages and I remembered that I had published a considerable amount of Cocojams material on this pancocojams blog and in discussion threads on Mudcat folk music forum.

And so, while I wait to see if cocojams.com will reappear and wait to see if I will hear from that hosting company [!!??!!], I decided to launch a Google blog that is an off-shoot of cocojams which I've named "cocojam2".

Cocojams2 will be more streamlined than cocojams.com, as it will only feature examples of playground rhymes, and probably won't include as many categories of those rhymes. Other cocojams content will be republished on my pancocojams blog (http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/ and possibly on future cocojams numbered Google blogs.

Cocojams2 also won't feature as many versions of rhymes, and won't include any videos, text analysis, or editorial commentary. Instead, I'll continue publishing videos (when possible), text analysis, and editorial comments along with any examples of that material that I feature on pancocojams.

Here's a link to cocojams2:
http://cocojams2.blogspot.com/

and here's a link to that blog's first post which expands on what I've written in this post:
http://cocojams2.blogspot.com/2014/10/introducing-cocojams2-offshoot-of.html.

I hope that you'll visit cocojams2, and share that link with others who may be interested in the cultural material that was (or is) featured on cocojams.com.

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Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Monday, October 27, 2014

"Let's Go Way Back In God" (Apostolic Gospel song with lyrics)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post provides two video examples and lyrics to the Gospel song "Let's Go Way Back In God".

The content of this post is presented for religious and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the composer of this songs. Thanks also to all who are featured in these recordings and thanks to the publishers of these examples on YouTube.

Note: This isn't the same Gospel song as "Let Us Go Way Back To God" that was recorded by Sam Cooke & The Soul Stirrers

A sound file of that song can be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNAZ_rVDH2A

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LYRIC PATTERN FOR THIS SONG
I've found two different lyric patterns for this song. I'm not sure which one is the oldest. I've labeled these as Pattern A and Pattern B.

Pattern A
1. Chorus [sing 4x]
2. Verse structure with response:
__ (a noun associated with church) don't __(a verb associated with church) like they used to (same verb)
Sing: Way back in God
Repeat first line Way back in God
Example:
Choir don't sing like they use to sing
Way back in God
Choir don't sing like they use to sing
Way back in God
3. Chorus [4x]
[Repeat this pattern.]

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Pattern B
1.`Chorus [4x]
2. Sing a verse from an old Gospel song/hymn. Repeat same verse one time.
3. Sing chorus [4x]
4. Sing verse from another old Gospel song/hymn. Repeat same verse one time.
6. Sing chorus [4x]
[Repeat this two part pattern as many times as you wish].
7. Sing verse structure with response as found in Part A.
8. Sing chorus
[Repeat that pattern as many times as you wish.]

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FEATURED EXAMPLES
Editor's Note:
It just so happens that both of these songs were sung during a church offering [when money is collected for the church upkeep and/or other church work such as "missionary services".]

Uptempo songs are usually sung for church offerrings, even if ushers pass the plate row by row instead of rows of congregants walking (or marching) to the front of the church altar to put their money into a designated offerring plate.r

Example #1: Let's Go Way Back ~ Offering Time ~ 2011 GLC Youth Conference



gospellight684, Uploaded on Jun 11, 2011

Love vs Confidence @ 2011 GLC Youth Conference
-snip-
This comment was written in response to the question "Where is this church located" and the song's lyrics were posted in this video's discussion thread:
NewMercies02, Sep 2, 2011
"@Mysinsaregone The church is located in Newark, New Jersey.

Lyrics
Chorus:
Lets go way back , way back in god
lets go way back, way back in god
lets go way back, way back in god

The people don't sing like they used to sing, way back in god
The people don't sing like they used to sing, way back in god

chorus

The people don't pray like they used to pray, way back in god
The people don't pray like they used to pray, way back in god.


Its a praise and worship song, u can really add any lyrics u want."
-snip-
This is Pattern A for this song.

Note the comment that there are no fixed verses for this song.
One commenter wrote that this service is "like a real Jamaican church". Another commenter wrote that she remembered that song from a church in Cuba.

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Example #2: Lets Go Way Back in God



Bethelapost Church Published on Jul 17, 2013 [Bethel Apostolic Church]

The Voices of the Overcomers, The Ambassadors and Kids in Praise ministering at Congress 2013, second night, July 17, 2013
Bethel Apostolic church
-snip-

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LYRICS: LET'S GO WAY BACK IN GOD
(composer ?}

Chorus
Let’s go way back
Way back in God
[Oh] Let’s go way back
Way back in God

[sing chorus 4x]

Verse #1
It’s me, it's me, it's me, oh Lord
Standing in the need of prayer
It’s me, it's me, it's me, oh Lord
Standing in the need of prayer
It’s me, it's me, it's me, oh Lord
Standing in the need of prayer
It’s me, it's me, it's me, oh Lord
Standing in the need of prayer

Chorus

Verse #2*
Amazing grace how sweet the sound
That saved a wretch like me
I once was lost but now I’m found
Was blind but now I see

Chorus

Verse #3
It was Grace that taught my heart to fear
And Grace my fear relieved
How precious did that Grace appear
The hour I first believed

Chorus

Verse #5
Choir don’t sing like they used to sing
Way back in God
Choir don’t sing like they used to sing
Way back in God

Verse #6
Preacher don’t preach like they used to preach
Way back in God
Preacher don’t preach like they used to preach
Way back in God

Chorus

Verse #7
People don’t shout like they used to shout
Way back in God
People don’t shout like they used to shout
Way back in God

Verse #8
Church don’t praise like they used to praise
Way back in God
Church don’t praise like they used to praise
Way back in God

Chorus

[Continue singing as long as you wish.]
-snip-
This is Pattern B for this song.

*There are no fixed verses for this song.
I wasn't able to transcribe the complete song that the choir in this video sung. Verses #2 and #3 are my substitution for those verses that the choir sand that I couldn't decipher.
-snip-
According to Google search, there are Bethel Apostolic churches throughout the United States and in Canada. I wonder if this denomination and this style of choir processional during church offerrings came to the USA and Canada via Jamaican immigrants.

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Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Examples Of "John Crow Say Him Naah Wuk Pan Sunday"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases examples of the Jamaican Mento (folk song)
"John Crow Say Him Naah Wuk Pan Sunday" (John Crow Says He Doesn't Work On Sunday").

The Addendum to this post showcases two Reggae examples of this song,

This post continues this blog's compilation of Jamaican songs that mention "John Crow". Click the John Crow tab below for other pancocojams post on John Crow.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to these featured vocalists for their musical legacy. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of these examples on the Internet.

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LYRICS: JOHN CROW SAY HIM NAAH WUK PAN SUNDAY
(traditional Jamaican Mento)

John Crow say him naah wuk pan Sunday!
Naah wuk! Him naah wuk pan Sunday!
John Crow say him naah wuk pan Sunday!
Naah wuk! Him naah wuk pan Sunday!
Tink a lie mi tell!
Kill yuh Mawga Cow!

Naah wuk! Him naah wuk pan Sunday!
John Crow say him a study fi teacha!!
Naah wuk! Him naah wuk pan Sunday!

John Crow say him a study fi lawya!!
Naah wuk! Him naah wuk pan Sunday!
John Crow say him a study fi parson!!
Naah wuk! Him naah wuk pan Sunday!

John Crow say him a dry lan' touris'!!
Naah wuk! Him naah wuk pan Sunday!
Tink a lie mi tell!
Kill yuh Mawga Cow!
Naah wuk! Him naah wuk pan Sunday!

Source: http://thelongwayhome-andreadowner.blogspot.com/2012/12/john-crow-brer-anancy-brer-tocuma-abna.html,
-snip-
Explanation of certain words:
"John Crow Say Him Naah Wuk Pan Sunday" - John Crow Says He Doesn't Work On Sunday(s).

"Tink a lie mi tell!"- I think he's lying.

"Kill yuh Mawga Cow!"= (He'll even) kill your skinny (meager) cow [on Sundays]

"a study fi" - study for (studying to be a ...)

"mawga" - meagre skinny
Source: http://www.thedialectdictionary.com/view/search/Jamaican/1592/ "Jamaican Dialect / Glossary"

"Dry land tourist" - "Slang expression for a Jamaican who has never left the island of Jamaica, but has begun to speak with a foreign accent, especially when he/she is around a tourist."

Source: http://jamaicanpatwah.com/term/Dry-land-tourist/1400

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WHAT THE SONG "JOHN CROW SAY HE NO WORK ON SUNDAY" MEANS
Here is one theory about this song from http://thelongwayhome-andreadowner.blogspot.com/2012/12/john-crow-brer-anancy-brer-tocuma-abna.html, Sunday, 8 December 2012 Andrea Downer
"JOHN CROW, BRER ANANCY, BRER TOCUMA, ABNA DUPPY (JAMAICAN ORAL & FOLK TRADITIONS)"
..."In Jamaica where I grew up, Sundays are hallowed days! Even for people who are NOT regular church goers! Even the most dedicated farmer or low-life lay-a-about in the district would take the occasional bath and put on some decent clothes and look respectable on Sundays...

As a matter of fact, on Sundays, the shops never used to really open of such, just a one window where the shopkeeper would sell the few items that would be purchased on Sundays...

Sundays were sacred! Trust mi! I could never imagine writing an exam or doing anything strenuous pon a Sunday back home. But here, having voluntarily transferred myself to a foreign land, I must confront the glaring differences in culture, lifestyle, grammar, syntax and practices and while it is a process I am learning and growing from, it takes much getting used to…
And as I was doing dishes and singing the song with my daughter, I remembered the oral tradition from which such a song [about John Crow] evolved. I also recalled that that particular song had originated from the African slaves that had been uprooted and taken to Jamaica and the rest of the Caribbean in sub-human conditions to be raped, exploited and robbed of their human dignity and cultural clingings. I believe the song might have come about due to the slave's defiance at being compelled to work seven days a week and they insisted on at least one rest day: the aforementioned hallowed Sunday....
-snip-
Italics added by me to highlight this sentence.

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My Opinion About This Song's Meaning:
I don't think that the song "John Crow Say Him Naah Wuk Pan Sunday" has to do with enslaved people wanting to have at least one rest day.

I think this song was composed after slavery and addresses the tendency of people to turn their backs on traditional ways when they are studying for professional occupations, or when they want to pretend to be from outside that culture.

In my opinion, an important word in the title "John Crow Say Him Naah Wuk Pan Sunday" is the word says. Note that the song title isn't "John Crow Him Naah Wuk Pan Sunday" ("John Crow, He Doesn't Work On Sunday"). Whether it's Sunday or not John Crow (the vulture) will scoop down and eat even a mawga cow (a skinny cow).

John Crow (the Jamaican vulture) is a despised character in most Jamaican songs.* This song is saying that those Jamaicans who disregard their culture -such as those professional people who work on Sunday and those "dry land tourists" (Jamaicans who put on an American accent) should also be despised, or at least be derided (held in contempt, made fun of). Notice how in the skits of people singing this song that are shown above, the group makes fun of those people mentioned. I believe they are making fun of them because those groups of people are acting like they are better than, or at least different from other Jamaicans. And I think that's the central problem that this song speaks to.

*Although John Crow is almost always a despised character, in Beenie Man's [Reggae Song] "John Crow" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IOMBNQXWR60) when the (black?) motorcyle is referred to as "John Crown" it's a complimente. My guess is that like John Crow (the vulture), that motorcyle is seen as "intimidating" and "fierce" in the vernacular sense of those words.

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FEATURED YOUTUBE EXAMPLES
These examples are presented in chronological order based on their publishing date on YouTube with the oldest dates given first.

Example #1: John crow says he na work on Sundays



Claire Kinkead, Uploaded on Nov 23, 2011
Traditional Jamaican song by the students of the Assemblies of God Bible College Jamaica

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Example #2: The Jamaican Folk Singers - John Crow



Dead Wax, Published on Mar 9, 2014

Jamaican Folk Singers - Volume II - John Crow

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Example #3: Jamaica folk Song - John crow seh im naah wok pan sunday


Wesley Henry, Published on Mar 17, 2014

House of Prayer Canada culture day 2013 - Jamaicans singing

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ADDENDUM: REGGAE EXAMPLES OF THIS SONG

Example #1: TENOR SAW - NO WORK ON AH SUNDAY (WHAT ONE RIDDIM CAN DO RIDDIM)



KILLA SELECTOR Uploaded on Nov 9, 2011
" BAD BAD TENOR SAW " !!!!!!!!!!!!!
-snip-
Here's a comment that quotes one portion of that song
Ason, 2013
"yesterday a big cow die in the pasture yesterday a big cow die in the pasture woah I see a flock of crows flying in the sky making a circle and then the crows fly down yes the crows fly down but the leader of the crows was gray and he come in the front an say yesterday when you was on earth kicking up dust but today you die, who is gonna bury you? but today you die, I wanna know who's gonna bury you then all his folks shout and say we gonna eat you me and my folks all gonna eat you

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Example #2: KING KONG - JOHN CROW WORK ON SUNDAY (PRESSURE & SLIDE RIDDIM)



KILLA SELECTOR, Uploaded on Nov 23, 2011

" WICKED KING KONG TUNE " ...

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Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

One Ska & One Reggae Example Of "Chi Chi Bud" (with 2 Chi Chi Bud Riddim songs)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases two Ska and Reggae examples of "Chi Chi Bud". "Chi Chi Bud Oh". "Chi Chi Bud Oh" (also known as "Chi Chi Bud") is a traditional Jamaican folk song (Mento).

The Chi Chi Bud Riddim (rhythm/tune) is used for a number of Reggae songs. The Addendum to this post showcases two of those records.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/10/chi-chi-bud-oh-jamaican-folk-song-mento.html for two text examples (lyrics) and three YouTube sound file examples of the Jamaican folk song "Chi Chi Bud Oh" (also known as "Chi Chi Bud").

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to these featured vocalists for their musical legacy. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of these examples on the Internet.

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FEATURED YOUTUBE EXAMPLES

SKA EXAMPLE: The Gaylads & The Skatalites - Chi Chi Bud



LittleBoyBlue1965, Published on Oct 3, 2014


Coxsone Dodd Prod. 1964 (Released On Coxsone JA)

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REGGAE EXAMPLE
Maxi Romeo - Chi Chi Bud - Chi Chi Bud Riddim



Dean Martin, Uploaded on Jun 13, 2011

Interested in the Caribbean? Love Caribbean culture? then www.thecaribbeanforum.com is the place for you. Come on over, register and enjoy some real Caribbean vibes.

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ADDENDUM: CHI CHI BUD RIDDIM

Example #1: Tarrus Riley - Life Precious Gift - Chi Chi Bud Riddim



Dean Martin, Uploaded on Jun 13, 2011

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Example #2: Mikey Spice - Walk A Mile In My Shoe - Chi Chi Bud Riddim



Dean Martin, Uploaded on Jun 13, 2011

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Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.