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Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Foot Stomping Cheers Alphabetical List (Numbers - C)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I (Numbers- C) of a five part series that provides an alphabetized list of text (word only) examples of foot stomping cheers. I'm referring to this compilation as the pancocojams (Azizi Powell) collection of foot stomping cheers.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/09/foot-stomping-cheers-alphabetical-list_40.html for Part II (D - G).

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/09/foot-stomping-cheers-alphabetical-list_6.html for Part III (H-J).

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/09/foot-stomping-cheers-alphabetical-list_53.html for Part IV - K-O

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/09/foot-stomping-cheers-alphabetical-list_22.html for Part V: P-Z

This is a work in progress. I'm not numbering these pages as additional examples will be added when I come across those examples and when examples are posted on this blog's comment thread.

Click the foot stomping cheer tag below for additional pancocojams posts about this subject.
Please add to the folkloric record by posting examples of these types of cheers that you remember in the comment section below. Please don't forget to include demographic information (when you remember hearing or performing these rhymes/chants- such as mid 1990s); what city or state in the USA or what country you remember hearing or performing these rhymes; who chanted these rhymes, for instance African American girls, ages 5-12 years).

Thank you!

Click for this related pancocojams post http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/09/when-i-started-collecting-examples-of.html When I Started Collecting Examples Of African American Foot Stomping Cheers

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DEFINITION OF FOOT STOMPING CHEERS
[Updated 9/7/2016]

"Foot stomping cheers" is the term that I coined in 2000 for a sub-set of children's cheerleader cheers that have distinctive textual structures and distinctive performance styles.

The term "foot stomping cheers" distinguishes examples of that category from other cheerleader cheers. However, it appears from my direct collection and from my online collection that girls usually referred to these examples as "cheers". Sometimes they were called "chants" or "steps".

"Foot stomping cheers" is a relatively new category of children's recreational play that involves chanting and choreographed foot and hand clapping movements. The earliest examples that I have found of these cheers are from the 1970s (USA).

1. Foot stomping cheers are composed using a variant form of call & response that I've termed "group/consecutive soloists". Usually the group voice (often without the first soloist) is heard first. The soloist then responds to the group. This pattern continues, and usually the soloist then has a short solo portion. The group may or may not chant again before the cheer begins again from the beginning with a new soloist. This pattern continues until every member of the group has had one equal (same amount of time) turn as the soloist. My experience is that the order of soloist is determined before the cheer begins, often with girls trying to be the first to call out "first", "second", "third" etc.

2. These cheers are performed by girls who stand in semi-circles, or in lines (usually horizontal lines), or stand in a circle with the soloist in the middle.
-snip-
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/05/an-overview-of-foot-stomping-movement.html for more information about foot stomping cheers.

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EXAMPLES: NUMBERS- C
These examples are presented in alphabetical order based on the first number or the first letter of the first letter of the first word. The source (i.e. book, direct collection, or website) is given below the example along with demographic information and/or comments.

Examples given with the citations "cocojams.com" were sent into my now defunct cultural website cocojams.com.
Alafia Children’s Ensemble was a cultural group in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and in Braddock, Pennsylvania that my daughter and I formed in the late 1990s to the early 2000s.


1-2-3-4-5 (Version #1)
All: 1-2-3-4-5
Soloist #1 My name is Alana
and I say “Hi!”
All: 6-7-8-9-10,
Soloist #1: I’m gonna step aside
and meet my friend
Soloist #2 My name is Jasmine
and I want to say “Hi!
All: 6-7-8-9-10,
Soloist #2: I’m gonna step aside
to meet my friend
Soloist #3 My name is Talia
and I’m here to say “Hi!”
All: 6-7-8-9-10,
Soloist #3: I’m gonna back it up
to meet my friend.

This cheer repeats from the beginning with each member of the squad or group having one turn as the soloist. When everyone has had a turn, the entire group chants the following lines in unison:
All: 1-2-3-4-5
We are Alafia and we say “Hi”
6-7-8-9-10
We’re gonna step together
cause that’s the end.
-African American girls (age 5-12 years) and African American boys (age 5-7) years; Alafia Children’s Ensemble, Braddock, Pennsylvania, 1997

****
A BULLDOG (Version #1)
Group: Ah bull dog.
Ah bull dog.
Ah bull dog.
Ah bull dog.
Soloist #1: My name is Kayla.
Group: Ah bulldog.
Soloist #1: And I’m gonna show you how to work that bulldog.
Group: Ah bulldog.
Soloist #1: First you roll it.
Control it.
Then you bounce it.
Announce it.
Then you pop it.
Don’t stop it.
Then you creep it.
Don’t sleep it. (or “Don’t weep it”.)
Then you stop,
Think,
A ring a ding ding.

Repeat the exact same cheer with the next soloist. Continue with this pattern until every member of the group has had one turn as soloist.
- Jasmine, Indonesia, Brittany, Kayla, Felicia, & Tiara (African American females ages 9-12 years), Alafia Children’s Ensemble, Braddock, Pennsylvania ., Collected by Azizi Powell 10/2000

****
A PANTHER
A panther
yeah yeah
a panther
ay what my name is Olivia
and they call me Ollie
yeah
and Im going to show you what this panther can do
first you shake it
dont break it
then you roll it
control it
then you pop it
dont stop it
sit down sit down
say what
sit down
-olivia; 9/16/2006; cocojams.com

****
AH RAH RAH AH BOOM TANG
Group: Ah Rah Rah Ah Boom Tang
Ah Rah Rah Ah Boom Tang
Ah Rah Rah Ah Boom Tang, baby
Ah Rah Rah Ah Boom Tang
Ah Rah Rah Ah Boom Tang
Soloist #1:My name is Tazi
Group: Ah Boom Tang
Soloist # 1:They call me Taz
Group: Ah Boom Tang
Soloist #1: And when they see me
Group: Ah Boom Tang
Soloist #1: They say “Ah Rah Rah
You look good, baby.”
Soloist #2:My name is Jennifer
Group: Ah Boom Tang
Soloist # 2:They call me Jenay
Group: Ah Boom Tang
Soloist #2: And when they see me
Group: Ah Boom Tang
Soloist #2: They say “Ah Rah Rah
Twist it, baby.”

(Repeat entire cheer with new soloist until everyone has had a turn).
-T.M.P. (African American female, from her memories of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the 1980s)

****
ANGELS GO SWINGING
Group: Angels go swinging
angels go swinging!
angels go swinging,
Angels go Swinging!
Solo:My name is Katy
I'm number 1
my reputation has just begun
so if you see me just step aside
'cause me and my man
don't take no jive
Group: Uh, you thank (think) you bad
Solo: Bad enough to make you mad
Group, Uh, you thank you cool
Solo: Cool enough to go to high school
Group: Uh, you thank you fine
Solo: Fine enough to MO,
fine enough to Macho (not really sure what this line means or if we were even saying it right)
fine enough to hula hoop,
fine enough to kick yo' duke
Everyone: say what, say what
say what say what say what
-Joi;( Birmingham, Alabama; 1990s), cocojams.com
-snip-
Note the word "thank" is probably not a typo. Instead, it probably is a purposeful (present tense) intensifier of the word "think" which means “REALLY think”.

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AT THE PLAYGROUND
All: I’ve fallin.
I can‘t get up.
I’ve fallin
And I can‘t get up.
Smack, Jack!
Homie don’t play that.
Kick off your shoes [or "Put up your dukes"]
and let’s get loose!
All except the soloist:
Bust it "T", Bust it "T", Bust it! [Use first initial of the soloist’s name or nickname]
Swing it "T", Swing it "T", Swing it!
Kick it, "T", Kick it "T", Kick it!
She kicks her beat at the playground,
you know, playground.
- African American girls ages 7-12 years old; Lillian Taylor Camp; Pittsburgh, PA, early
1990s; collected by T.M.P. ; transcribed from audio tape by Azizi Powell, 1996

****
BAD GIRLS
Bad girl(2x)well my name is (say a name) and i'm a bad girl I'm gonna show you
how to beat(say another name)(turn around while saying beeeaat -say the name
that you said was going to be beat)
-LaTailya (African American female; Fort Pitt ALA; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania); 3/21/2006 ; cocojams [cheerleader cheer]

****
BANG BANG CHOO CHOO TRAIN (Version #1)
Group: Bang, Bang Choo Choo Train.
Watch Indonesia do her thang.
Soloist #1: I can’t.
Group: Why not?
Soloist #1: I can’t.
Group: Why not?
Soloist #1: Because my back is achin.
My bra’s too tight.
My hips keep movin’ from the left to the right.
Group: Her back is achin.
Her bra’s too tight.
Her hips keep movin from the left to the right.

(Repeat chant with the next soloist who gives her name or nickname. The cheer continues with this pattern until everyone has had one chance as soloist.)
-African American girls ages 7-12 years; (Alafia Children's Ensemble, Braddock, Pennsylvania), 10/1997; collected by Azizi Powell. 10/97; also collected by Azizi Powell from African American girls 7-12 years; Pittsburgh, PA (11/2001 & additional dates through 2005 as hand clap rhyme)
-snip-
Note: "Bang Bang Choo Choo Train" was one of the most popular ones that were sent in my cocojams.com website. I'm only including a few examples of that cheer in this compilation.

However, I think that chant, along with the closely related chant "Brickwall Waterfall" is usually performed as a hand clap rhyme and not what I would categorize as a foot stomping cheer.

****
BAND BANG CHU CHU TRAIN (Version #2)
bang bang chu chu train it really goes like this in new York
(1 person) bang bang chuchu train
let me see u do ur thing
(2 person) i cant
(1 person) why not
(2 person) my back aches my belts to tight
and my booty is shakin from left to right left right left, left right left
-m&m; 10/7/2006, cocojams.com
-snip-
I'm not sure if this is performed as a cheer or as a hand clap rhyme.

****
BEE BODY PLANET ROCK
Bee body planet rock
We don't stop
Bee body planet rock
We don't stop
My name is _______
My color is_________
I __________

Like My Name is lusive.
My color is green.
I got picked up in a stretch limousine.
-mollflanders, http://www.lipstickalley.com/showthread.php/43158-Hood-Cheers/page2?s=c36b81842e44a5cd4a49678538954ac4, 8/18/2006
-snip-
This blogger also added the following comment "And Hollywood not swingin. It was only fun if you could make up your own ending. The older we got, the nastier they got lol."

****
CALL REPUTATION
this is a saying call reputation
my name is yonnqa
i'm number one
my reputation has just begun
so if you see me step a side
cause i don't take no jive
oh think she cool
correction baby i no i'm cool
i no karate
i no kunfu
you miss with me
i co it on you
rasasol o dazzo o ox2
-yaya ; 2/23/2007, cocojams.com
-snip-
This is a form of the "Hula Hula" cheer.

****
CANDY GIRL
All: Candy Girl.
All my world.
Look so sweet.
Special treat.
Soloist #1: This is the way we do the Bounce.
Candy Girl.
Group: Do the Bounce. Do the Bounce.
Soloist #1: All my world.
Group: Do the Bounce. Do the Bounce.
Soloist #1: Look so sweet.
Group: Do the Bounce. Do the Bounce.
Soloist #1: Special treat
Group: Do the Bounce. Do the Bounce.
All: Candy Girl.
All my world.
Look so sweet.
Special treat.
Soloist #2: This is the way we do the Snake.
Candy Girl.
Group: Do the bounce do the Snake.
Soloist #2: All my world.
Group: Do the Snake. Do the Snake.
Soloist #2: Look so sweet.
Group: Do the Snake. Do the Snake.
--T.M.P.(African American female; memories of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the mid 1980s; audio recording 1992; In 2000 I observed members of Braddock, Pennsylvania's chapter of Alafia Children’s Ensemble perform this cheer with the exact same beat, and tune, and the same words except for then popular R&B/Hip Hop dances)

****
CANDY GIRL (Version #2)
does anybody know candy girl? little girls i know still play it!

candy girl, oh my world
look so sweet, special treat
this is the way you do the "wop"(or the "snake", or whatever dance is cute that u know the name of)
candy girl, say wop,wop
oh my world, say wop, wop
look so sweet, say wop,wop
special treat, say wop,wop(and then move on to the next dance)
- bitsy196 (African American female); http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=4123&page=4; “remember when?”; 6-25-2003 [no location given];

****
CAN YOU DID IT?
All: So can you dig it?
Yeah.
So can you dig it?
Soloist #1: My name is Maria.
And I’m a flick flick.
And I’mma punch you in your lip.
So can you dig it?
Group: What?
Soloist #1: So can you dig it?
Group: What?
Soloist #1: I was sittin by the fire
Watchin it get higher
With my man,
You understand.
Cause I’m a special kind of lady
With a special kind of man.
I get to see my baby
WHENEVER I can.
So can you dig it?
So can you dig it?

(Repeat entire cheer with the next soloist, who says her name or nickname, and the same words. Continue with this pattern until every member of the group as had one turn as soloist).
- African American girls ages 6-12 (Lillian Taylor Summer Camp (Kingsley Association; Pittsburgh, PA between 1989-1992)

****
CHARLIE BROWN (fragment)
Charlaaaay a Charlie Brown, what you say now?
Charlaaaay a Charlie Brown.
Hey Shoewhore!
That's me. Foxxxy as I wanna be. Gon' slide to the side, gon turn that sh&t* around, gon break it on down with Charlie Brown!
Cuz you know that I can get down!
A--woooooooosh!
-Shoewhore, http://www.lipstickalley.com/showthread.php/43158-Hood-Cheers/page5
snip-
*The full word was spelled out in this example.

****
CHEERING IS MY GAME
Dn Dn Dn Dn Dn (Twice)
CALL: Barbara. Barbara is my name.
RESPONSE: Dn Dn Dn Dn Dn (similarly)
Cheering is my game.
Freddy. Freddy was my man.
But Ken is my main man.
Dn Dn Dn Dn Dn (Twice)
Cheer continues until each girl announces her name and her boyfriend’s name.
-"Old Mother Hippletoe, Rural and Urban Children's Songs"; http://www.newworldrecords.org/linernotes/80291.pdf; Barbara Borum and other Washington, D.C., schoolgirls, vocals.
Recorded 1976 in Washington, D.C., by Kate Rinzler, included in 1978 vinyl record.
-snip-
I happened upon a copy of the On Mother Hippletoe vinyl record set at a library used book sale sometime in the late 1990s. I bought that record for its record notes even though I didn't have a record player at that time. Band 3 "Cheerleading" of that record features four* examples of what the author of the record notes calls "cheers". Two of these examples* (Cheering Is My Game and Hollywood Keeps Swingin/Dynomite) have the textual structure that I consider a signature characteristic of "foot stomping cheers". I've collected multiple examples of both of those cheers among African American in various parts of the United States.

Here's an excerpt from those record notes:
"In 1973-75, fieldwork for the Festival of American Folklife revealed cheerleading girls taking turns doing a dance step or a simple gymnastic trick. In 1976, perhaps because of the popularity on television of the Olympic Games, there was a sudden citywide interest in gymnastic pyrotechnics: complete frontward and sideward splits, forward and backward flips, and cartwheels ending in jumped splits."...
-snip-
I'm not sure if this passage means that the types of cheers that I now call "foot stomping cheers" were first documented in 1873. In any event, I've not found any references to foot stomping cheers that are performed with these gymnastic movements.

****
CHEERLEADER (Version #2)
All: Cheerleader.
Roll Call.
Soloist #1: Yolanda,
They call me Lannie.
Group: Hey! Hey!
Soloist #2: Renee,
They call me NayNay.
Group: Hey! Hey!
Soloist #3: Ebony,
They call me Ebony.
Group: Hey! Hey!
Soloist #4: Melissa,
They call me Missy.
Group: Hey! Hey!

The cheer continues this way until everyone says their name and nickname. If the soloist doesn't have a nickname, she repeats her first name.
-T.M.P.(African American female; memories of Garfield neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, early to mid 1980s).

****
CHEERLEADER (Version #3)
All: Cheerleader.
Roll call!
Soloist #1: My name is Keisha.
They call me Key Key.
And when they call me,
They go.
All: Boom, Boom.
Ah Boom, Boom!
All: Cheerleader.
Roll Call!
Soloist #2: My name's Jozita.
They call me Cocoa.
And when they call me,
They go
All:
Boom, Boom.
Ah Boom, Boom!

The cheer continues this way until everyone says their name and nickname. If the girl doesn't have a nickname, the first name is repeated.
-T.M.P.(African American female; memories of Garfield neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, early to mid 1980s).

****
CHEERLEADER (Version #4)
All: Cheer.
Leader.
Roll.
Call.
Are you ready?
Soloist #1: Shayla.
They call me Rosa.
Soloist #2: Shana.
They call me Poo.
Soloist #3: Shana.
They call me Shay.
Soloist #4: Jamie.
They call me Jay Jay.
Soloist #5: Jackie.
They call me HaJack (HighJack?).
All: Cheer.
Leader.
Zodiac signs.
Soloist #1: Aquarius.
That’s a dog.
Soloist #2: Cancer.
That’s a crab.
Soloist #3: Leo.
That’s a lion.
Soloist #4:Scorpio.
That’s a spider.*
Soloist #5: Scorpio.
That’s a spider.
All: Cheer.
Leader.
Phone.
Numbers.
Are you ready?
Soloist #1: 348-5110.**
Group: Always busy.
Soloist #2: 348-4554.
Group: Always busy.
Soloist #3: 348-3322
Group: Always busy.
Soloist #4: 348-5679
Group: Always busy.
Soloist #5: 348-4285
Group: Always busy.
- Shayla, Shana, Shana, Jamie, and Jackie (African American females about 10 years-12 years old, Talbot Towers Housing after-school program, Braddock, PA; 1985); collected by Azizi Powell, 1985

*Notice that the symbol for Scorpio is wrong. Actually, Scorpio's symbol is a scorpion and not a spider.

** I changed the phone numbers the girls chanted to protect their privacy. Note that these phone numbers are without the area code that was later installed in Pittsburgh (in the 1990s?).

****
HELLO (Version of Cheering Is My Name, Version #5)
H-e-l-l-o,
we are here
to say hello to Mocha

Mocha is my name
and cheering is my game
Pink and purple are my colors
don't you worry 'bout my lovers.
(Uhm she think she bad)
Correction baby, I know I'm bad.
(Uhm, she think she cool)
Cool enough to steal your dude.
(Uhm, she think she fine)
Fine enough to blow his mind.
-Miss Mocha, http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=31403&page=5, 03-28-2003
-snip-
Another blogger Honeykiss1974 wrote regarding "Hello"
"OHHHH Thank you Miss Mocha for this chant!

This one takes me BACK!!!! *lol* WAYY! BACK!!!
I remember doing this chant during recess in the third grade!"
-snip-
"1974" could be that blogger's birth year. If so, that would mean that she would have performed that cheer in the early 1980s.

****
CHECK
Soloist: My name is Shelly
Others: Check
Soloist: They call me Shell
Others: Check
My horoscope is Aquarius
Others: Aquarius
Soloist: If you don't like
Others: Check
Soloist: Without a dial*
Others: Check
Soloist: Just call my number
and check me out.
Others: Check her out
Soloist: Cause I am fine.**
My number is 222-888**
Others: Check
Soloist: That fellow is mine **
Cause I know how to skate
Others: Well alright
Well alright
-Shelly H. (African American female, Cleveland, Ohio, mid 1980s), transcribed by Azizi Powell, May 2007
Repeat cheer from the beginning with the next soloist. That soloist says her name & nickname, and gives her astrological sun sign ("horoscope") and her phone number. In the " I like to ___" line, that soloist indicates what she is good at doing ("sing", "dance", "draw"). This pattern continues with the next soloist until everyone has had one turn as the soloist.

"Check" here means something like "Ok" or "That's Right".

* "If you don't like without a dial" probably means "If you don't like it without a doubt"
** "Mine" and "fine" were elongated and sung-"my -i-i-n" ;"fi-i-i-n"

****
CHOCOLATE CITY
All: Chock-let City.
Chock chock-let City.
Chock-let City.
Chock Chock-let City.
Soloist #1: My name is Linda
And I'm walkin.
Group: She's walkin.
Soloist #1: I'm talkin.
Group: She's talkin.
Soloist #1: I'M TALKIN TO [girls stop using first step beat]
All the boys in Chock-let City [begin new faster step beat]
Get down to the nitty gritty.
Long time no see.
Sexy as I wanna be.
Some hittin me high.
Some hittin me low.
Some hittin me on my-
Don't ask what.
Group: What?
Soloist #1: My b-u-tt butt
That's what.

Repeat from the beginning with the next soloist who says her name or nickname. Continue this pattern until every girl in the group has had one chance as the soloist with this cheer.
Repeat from the beginning with the next soloist who says her name or nickname. Continue this pattern until every girl in the group has had one chance as the soloist with this cheer.
- T.M.P, transcribed in 1996 from tape recording done in 1990.(Lillian Taylor Camp); Azizi Powell collected the exact same words from Chatauqua (African American female, 10 year old) & Ralene (African American female, 12 years old , both from the Garfield section of Pittsburgh, PA, in 1999 (at Fort Pitt School)

"Chocolate City" was the nickname for "Washington, D.C."

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This concludes Part I of this series.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, cultural, and recrational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thank you for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments and additional versions of these cheers and/or examples of other cheers are welcome.turel

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