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Sunday, July 16, 2017

Two Examples Of "I've Been 'Buked & I've Been Scorned" - Hall Johnson Singers/Alvin Ailey Dancers And Mahalia Jackson

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases the African American Spiritual "I've Been 'Buked And I Been Scorned" sung by Mahalia Jackson. This post also showcases a portion of Alvin Ailey Dance Theater's now classic "revelations" that features "I've Been 'Buked And I've Been Scorned".

Standard lyrics for this Spiritual are also included in this post along with definitions of "'buked " and "scorned" and along with comments about both of these two showcased renditions.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, religious, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the unknown composer/s of this song and thanks to all those who are featured in the videos that are showcased in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

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LYRICS: I BEEN 'BUKED AND I BEEN SCORNED
(African American Spiritual, composer unknown)

I've been 'buked and I've been scorned
(Yes)
I've been 'buked and I've
been scorned
(Children)
I've been 'buked and I've been scorned,
I've been talked about
Sure's you're born

There is trouble all over this world
(Yes)
There is trouble all over this
world
(Children)
There is trouble all over this world
There is trouble all over this world

Ain't gonna lay my religion down
(No)
Ain't gonna lay my religion down,
(Children)
Ain't gonna lay my religion down
Ain't gonna lay my religion
down

I've been 'buked and I've been scorned
(Yes)
I've been 'buked and I've been
scorned,
(Children)
I've been 'buked and I've been scorned,
I've been talked about,
Sure as you're born.

-snip-
These lyrics were found on various internet sites. The words in parenthesis are optional.

I learned this song in the 1950s and always sung "Ain't gonna let my religion down". I was surprised to find the word "lay" instead of "let". Now I'm not sure which word is "right".

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DEFINITIONS FOR "'BUKED" AND "SCORNED"
"Buked" = rebuked

From https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/rebuke
"If you receive a rebuke, it means that you have been reprimanded, or scolded. You're sure to get a rebuke if you forget to do your math homework four days in a row.
The word rebuke can be a verb, meaning to sternly reprimand or scold, but it can also be a noun, because a rebuke is the result of being scolded. The root comes from the Old French rebuchier and means "to hack down," or "beat back." A rebuke, then, is meant to be critical and to chide — in today's terms, a rebuke is verbal smack-down!"

**
Definition of "scorn"
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scorn
"1
: open dislike and disrespect or derision often mixed with indignation
2
: an expression of contempt or derision
3
: an object of extreme disdain, contempt, or derision : something contemptible"

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Example #1: Alvin Ailey's Revelations



Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Published on Feb 17, 2012
-snip-
From https://www.alvinailey.org/performances/repertory/revelations
"Revelations
Using African-American spirituals, song-sermons, gospel songs and holy blues, Alvin Ailey’s Revelations fervently explores the places of deepest grief and holiest joy in the soul.

More than just a popular dance work, it has become a cultural treasure, beloved by generations of fans. Seeing Revelations for the first time or the hundredth can be a transcendent experience, with audiences cheering, singing along and dancing in their seats from the opening notes of the plaintive “I Been ’Buked” to the rousing “Wade in the Water” and the triumphant finale, “Rocka My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham.”

Ailey said that one of America’s richest treasures was the African-American cultural heritage —“sometimes sorrowful, sometimes jubilant, but always hopeful.” This enduring classic is a tribute to that tradition, born out of the choreographer’s “blood memories” of his childhood in rural Texas and the Baptist Church. But since its premiere in 1960, the ballet has been performed continuously around the globe, transcending barriers of faith and nationality, and appealing to universal emotions, making it the most widely-seen modern dance work in the world.

[...]

All performances of Revelations are permanently endowed by a generous gift from Donald L. Jonas in celebration of the birthday of his wife Barbara and her deep commitment to Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater.

Music
PILGRIM OF SORROW
I Been 'Buked - Music arranged by Hall Johnson
Didn't My Lord Deliver Daniel - Music arranged by James Miller
Fix Me, Jesus - Music arranged by Hall Johnson

[...] "
-snip-
Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/01/the-alvin-ailey-american-dance-theatre.html for several videos of portions of Alvin Ailey Dance Theater's "Revelations" as well as an interview with Judith Jamison a previous pancocojams post about Alvin Ailey Dance Theater's "Revelations".

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/11/alvin-ailey-american-dance-theater.html for Alvin Ailey Dance Theater performing the complete "Revelations" dance.

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Example #2: I've Been Buked and I've Been Scorned- Mahalia Jackson



KJ McRae, Published on Apr 26, 2015

Mahalia Jackson, March on Washington, August 28, 1963.
ALL RIGHTS TO CBS.
-snip-
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/March_on_Washington_for_Jobs_and_Freedom
"The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, the March on Washington, or The Great March on Washington,[1][2] was held in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, August 28, 1963. The purpose of the march was to stand up for civil and economic rights for African Americans during a time when racism was more prevalent throughout society. At the march, Martin Luther King Jr., standing in front of the Lincoln Memorial, delivered his historic "I Have a Dream" speech in which he called for an end to racism.[3]
The march was organized by A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin, who built an alliance of civil rights, labor, and religious organizations[4] that came together under the banner of "jobs and freedom."[5]

Estimates of the number of participants varied from 200,000 to 300,000;[6] the most widely cited estimate is 250,000 people.[7] Observers estimated that 75–80% of the marchers were black.[8] The march was one of the largest political rallies for human rights in United States history.[5]

The march is credited with helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964[9][10] and preceded the Selma Voting Rights Movement which led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.[11]"

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