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Wednesday, July 21, 2021

2021 Article Excerpt: "A Brief History of Black Names, from Perlie to Latasha" by Trevon Logan

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents a quote from the Jan. 23, 2021 article by Trevon Logan entitled  "A brief history of black names, from Perlie to Latasha". 

The content of this post is presented for historical, cultural, and onomastic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Trevon Logan for this article.

****
ARTICLE EXCERPT: "A BRIEF HISTORY OF BLACK NAMES, FROM PERLIE TO LATASHA"
https://theconversation.com/a-brief-history-of-black-names-from-perlie-to-latasha-130102
"Most people recognize that there are first names given almost exclusively by black Americans to their children, such as Jamal and Latasha.

While fodder for comedians and social commentary, many have assumed that these distinctively black names are a modern phenomenon. My research shows that’s not true.

Long before there was Jamal and Latasha, there was Booker and Perlie. The names have changed, but my colleagues and I traced the use of distinctive black names to the earliest history of the United States.

As scholars of history, demographics and economics, we found that there is nothing new about black names.

Black names aren’t new

Many scholars believe that distinctively black names emerged from the civil rights movement, perhaps attributable to the Black Power movement and the later black cultural movement of the 1990s as a way to affirm and embrace black culture. Before this time, the argument goes, blacks and whites had similar naming patterns.

Historical evidence does not support this belief.

Until a few years ago, the story of black names depended almost exclusively on data from the 1960s onward. New data, such as the digitization of census and newly available birth and death records from historical periods, allows us to analyze the history of black names in more detail.

We used federal census records and death certificates from the late 1800s in Illinois, Alabama and North Carolina to see if there were names that were held almost exclusively by blacks and not whites in the past. We found that there were indeed.

For example, in the 1920 census, 99% of all men with the first name of Booker were black, as were 80% of all men named Perlie or its variations. We found that the fraction of blacks holding a distinctively black name in the early 1900s is comparable to the fraction holding a distinctively black name at the end of the 20th century, around 3%.

What were the black names back then?

We were interested to learn that the black names of the late 1800s and early 1900s are not the same black names that we recognize today.

The historical names that stand out are largely biblical such as Elijah, Isaac, Isaiah, Moses and Abraham, and names that seem to designate empowerment such as Prince, King and Freeman.

These names are quite different from black names today such as Tyrone, Darnell and Kareem, which grew in popularity during the civil rights movement.

Once we knew black names were used long before the civil rights era, we wondered how black names emerged and what they represented. To find out, we turned to the antebellum era – the time before the Civil War – to see if the historical black names existed before the emancipation of slaves.

Since the census didn’t record the names of enslaved Africans, this led to a search of records of names from slave markets and ship manifests.

Using these new data sources, we found that names like Alonzo, Israel, Presley and Titus were popular both before and after emancipation among blacks. We also learned found that roughly 3% of black Americans had black names in the antebellum period – about the same percentage as did in the period after the Civil War.

But what was most striking is the trend over time during enslavement. We found that the share of black Americans with black names increased over the antebellum era while the share of white Americans with these same names declined, from more than 3% at the time of the American Revolution to less than 1% by 1860.

By the eve of the Civil War, the racial naming pattern we found for the late 1800s was an entrenched feature in the U.S."...

****

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Sunday, July 18, 2021

An Example Of "I Will Call Upon The Lord", The 1981 American Hymn That Inspired The Gospel Songs Entitled "Oh Magnify The Lord (For He Is Worthy To Be Praised)"



Cedarmont Kids, Sept. 23, 2015

****
Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases a YouTube sound file of the 1981 praise hymn by Michael O'Shields entitled "I Will Call Upon The Lord". 

This post also showcases YouTube videos of two arrangements of the African American gospelized hymn "Oh Magnify The Lord (For He Is Worthy To Be Praised". Those arrangements and other arrangements of "Oh Magnify The Lord (For He Is Worthy To Be Praised) are based on Michael O'Shield's 1981 hymn. 

Information about Michael O'Shields is included in this post along with The lyrics for "I Will Call Upon The Lord" are included in this post. The basic lyrics for "Oh Magnify The Lord (For He His Worthy To Be Praised" are also included in this post. The tunes for these two songs are quite similar and some of their basic words are the same or vey similar.

The content of this post is presented for religious, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to 
Michael O'Shields, the composer of "I Will Call Upon The Lord", the source for or inspiration for the Gospel song "Oh Magnify The Lord (For He Is Worthy To Be Praised". 

Thanks to all those who are showcased in these videos and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these videos on YouTube. 

****
INFORMATION ABOUT THE HYMN "I WILL CALL UPON THE LORD"
From 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XGfSEqIjWps&ab_channel=RixTillman (summary)

I Will Call Upon the Lord by Michael O'Shields (Tune: O'SHIELDS), published by Rix Tillman, June 14, 2019


"Written by Michael O'Shields in 1981 and this round/praise hymn is published in 16 hymnals. Michael O’Shields (1948- ) was a young minister traveling in Oklahoma and Texas in the 1970s. He was struggling to make ends meet, and it was especially tough when the contribution was pretty meager, so he was calling upon the Lord for very tangible, felt needs when he wrote “I Will Call Upon the Lord”. The song’s pace might make you think he was in a joyful, upbeat mood, but he was likely feeling the opposite deep down. Yet, O’Shields knew what to do – he used the words David wrote in Psalm 18 centuries earlier as praise to God when he had been saved from enemies."...
-snip-
My guess is that Michael O'Shields is a White American because there's no information about his race in the few online write-ups that I've found and "White" is usually considered to be the default for race in the USA and in other Western nations. (Needless to say, I believe that there shouldn't be any default races online or offline in multicultural societies.)
-snip- 
The hymn "I Will Call Upon The Lord" is based on three Biblical scriptures:
- Psalms 34:3 - "O magnify the Lord with me, and let us exalt HIS Name together." and
- 2 Samuel 22:4 - "I will call on the Lord, who is worthy to be praised: so shall I be saved from mine enemies." Here's lyrics for this song from https://www.hymnlyrics.org/newlyrics_i/i_will_call_upon_the_lord.php "I will call upon the Lord, (I will call upon the Lord,)

Who is worthy to be praised, (Who is worthy to be praised)

So shall I be saved from mine enemies (So shall I be saved from mine enemies).

 
The Lord liveth, and blessed be the rock!

And may the God of my salvation be exalted!

The Lord liveth, and blessed be the rock!

And may the God of my salvation be exalted!"

-snip- Other lyrics are included in different arrangements of this song. -snip- Update: July 19, 2021: Here's some additional informtion about the song "I Will Call On The Lord" from https://thescottspot.wordpress.com/2016/11/12/i-will-call-upon-the-lord-written-in-1981/ "I WILL CALL UPON THE LORD"                                                    written in 1981

"The Story

Michael O’Shields (1948 – ) was a traveling Bible teacher in West Texas and Oklahoma. That is a lot of territory to cover, but the need to make a living and the meager offerings from his ministry required him to travel a lot.

His Bible studies were often conducted in homes, quite often in farmhouses in rural areas. People seemed to be hungry for good Bible teaching, and Michael was thrilled to be used by the Lord in this way, but he was newly married and he needed to bring home some money for groceries....

The long trips, though, gave Michael time to write some songs, which he sometimes introduced to those attending Bible studies. This song was one of those songs.

[...]

But this song served another purpose. It was intended to be sung with the men singing a line, and the women echoing that line. Some of the farmers to whom Michael introduced this song didn’t great singing voices, but Michael didn’t care. By having the men begin the song, they were taking leadership in worship. Soon this song became a favorite."...

****
INFORMATION ABOUT THE GOSPEL SONG "O MAGNIFY THE LORD (FOR HE IS WORTHY TO BE PRAISED"
The song "O Magnify The Lord ("For He Is Worthy To Be Praised)" is an African American gospelized hymn that is based on (inspired by) Michael O'Shield's song "I Will Call Upon The Lord".  There are multiple arrangements of the Gospel song "O Magnify The Lord (For He Is Worthy To Be Praised". Many arrangements of this Gospel song include additional lyrics.

The basic lyrics for this Gospel song are:

"O magnify the Lord 
For He is worthy to be praised
O magnify the Lord
For He is worthy to be praised.

Hosannah! blessed be the Rock
Blessed be the Rock
Of my salvation.

Hosannah! blessed be the Rock
Blessed be the Rock
Of my salvation"
-snip-
All of these lyrics are sung in unison and are usually repeated in full a number of times. Additional lyrics may be added as verses.

I don't know which Gospel singer or Gospel group was the first to perform this song and to record this song. However, I believe those performers were African American because that song has always been most closely associated with African Americans.

If you have information about this subject, please share it in the comment section below. 

****

VIDEO #2: Ushers Day Celebration...and they Marched for Jesus


Brian Baker, May 3, 2010 Anointed One Ministries Ushers Day Celebration ... as the Ushers Strutted during offering. Services were held at Bethel AME Church in Cambridge, MD -snip- This video of an African American "Ushers Day" service shows ushers in a church procession during an "offering" (i.e. a collection of money to support the church and/or to support the usher's church ministry.) Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2021/01/the-history-and-purposes-of-african.html for a 2021 pancocojams post entitled "The History And Purposes Of African American Church Ushers (Video & Article Excerpts)". Other pancocojams post about African American church processions can be found by clicking that tag below.
**** VIDEO #3: "Oh Magnify the Lord Medley", Trinity Choir
Alfred Street Baptist Church, July 31, 2015 **** Thanks for visiting pancocojams. Visitor comments are welcome.

Saturday, July 17, 2021

(British Nigerian Comedian) Gina Yashere - "The Rules of Meeting My Mom" (with comments about referring to elders as "Aunty" or "Uncle")


Just For Laughs, Dec. 2, 2020

#GinaYashere on leaving her engineering career for comedy and the hilarious way her girlfriend met her mom.

 #GinaYashereStandUp from the #JustForLaughs Festival in 2018.

[...]

ABOUT JUST FOR LAUGHS :
Just For Laughs is the world’s premiere destination for #standupcomedy. JFL produces the world’s largest and most prestigious comedy event every July in Montreal, as well as annual festivals in Toronto and Sydney. On this channel, you will find comedic clips from some of the most legendary comedians in the business: Chris Rock, Bill Burr, Kevin Hart, and more. We also feature stand-up from newcomers such as John Mulaney, Bo Burnham, and Amy Schumer. If you just want to laugh, you’re in the right place.

****
Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents information about British Nigerian comedian Gina Yashere and showcases a YouTube video of one of Gina Yashere's stand up comedy segments.

Some comments from the discussion thread of that YouTube video are also included in this post. Many of those comments refer to the Nigerian custom that Gina talked about in which people refer to eldes as aunty or uncle.

The content of this post is presented for cultural and entertainment purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Gina Yashere for her cultural contributions and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post. Thanks also to the publisher of this video on YouTube. 

****
INFORMATION ABOUT GINA YASHERE
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gina_Yashere
"Gina Obedapo Iyashere is a British comedian who has made many appearances on British and American television.

Early life

Yashere was born and raised in London, to Nigerian parents.[1] Before becoming a comedian, she worked as a lift maintenance technician and engineer (all of which she mentions in her stand-up routine).[2][3]

She uses the surname "Yashere" due to encountering common mispronunciation of her original surname.[4][5][6]

Career

Yashere was a finalist in the Hackney Empire New Act of the Year competition in 1996. She has appeared in a number of television programmes, including in the comedy series The Lenny Henry Show, where she played Tanya and Mrs Omokorede, the pushy mum. She voiced Keisha on the animated series Bromwell High. In 2005, she appeared in the reality television series Comic Relief does Fame Academy, in aid of Comic Relief, and she co-hosted the 2006 and 2007 MOBO Awards alongside 2Baba and Coolio. She has made numerous appearances on Mock the Week, and appears on the CBBC show Gina's Laughing Gear.

In 2007, Yashere was featured on the reality show Last Comic Standing, auditioning in Sydney. She was among the ten finalists, but on 1 August 2007, she and Dante were the first two finalists eliminated.

In 2008, she became the first Briton to perform on Def Comedy Jam. On 3 September 2009, she appeared on The Tonight Show with Conan O'Brien and performed a stand-up comedy routine. On 24 December, she appeared on Live at the Apollo. She appeared twice on the short-lived primetime show The Jay Leno Show: on 21 October 2009, a video of Yashere showed her giving free fortune-telling readings to passers-by, and on 25 November 2009, she operated a walk-in psychic booth. Starting in 2010, she appeared semi-regularly on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, in a sketch comedy series called Madame Yashere: The Surly Psychic.

[…]

Starting on 16 March 2017, Yashere became the newest British correspondent for The Daily Show.[8]

In September 2019, Yashere appears in a supporting role on the 2019 Chuck Lorre CBS sitcom, Bob Hearts Abishola, which Lorre created with Yashere. Yashere writes for the show and plays Folake Olowofoyeku's character Abishola's best friend, Kemi.[9] Bob Hearts Abishola is the first American sitcom to feature a Nigerian family.[10][11]"....

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS YOUTUBE VIDEO'S DISCUSSION THREAD
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDX1YTL-ByU&ab_channel=JustForLaughs

All these comments are from 2021. Numbers are added for referencing purposes only.

1. DImaf Dee
"Always on point.... Too Hilarious!!! Especially the one called every elder mum/daddy or aunty/uncle.. It is really an African thing.  In the African culture, you dare not call an elder by their first name. In fact in most cases, you will not know their names.James

**
2. James
"Always seems to end so quickly, she's such a good comedian. Plus, everything she said about Nigerian culture is 100."

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3. UDUAK JIMMY
"100% correct about the Yoruba culture in South West Nigeria where she probably comes from.

 We in South South Nigeria don't prostrate or lay face down in the presence of elderly people. We bow slightly, shake their one hand with two of ours, stuff like that.

 We all don't dare call older people by their names though; they are aunties and uncles anytime."

**
4. Amy Diallo
"πŸ˜€ that is so true, we never call  adults by their name. My american friends aways ask how many aunts and uncles I have."

**
5. RJ london
"I'm in London, I'm not African and even I call any african elder aunty or uncle my first love taught me that lol the only thing is if they recognise you the next time, they start asking you bare questions lol. My Hermes delivery driver now stops for a chat every time asking about the kids ect πŸ˜‚"

**
6. Fa Hud
"the live commentary from parents - esp. mums - when watching a film or whatever is so on point - also true for Somalis"

**

7. Stella Ng
"Omg Nigerians is like Chinese. Meat butcher uncle and auntie. We also don't hug! My mom would call me a white lady when I hugged her!! I love her sketches. So relatable the immigrant experience."

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Reply
8. Jacki Moon
"Your mom would call you white if you tried to hug her?! πŸ’€ that’s so amazingly funny lol"

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Reply
9. Spunkymunky
"LOL.  I can relate.  I'm Vietnamese American.  Vietnamese don't totally get into bowing--it's 50/50.  So I figured as a Vietnamese American I don't do bowing.  Friend comes over and does a full on bow.  I'm so embarrassed.  And my parents were like, yeah, that's right.  You better."

**
10. DragonFly
"Her storytelling is really good"

**
11. Charlie Lucai-Woodsboro
"It's an African thing to address somebody older as uncle/aunty. We do that here in South Africa to lol"

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12. Manna Jacob
"Same in India too haha"

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Reply
13. Yourworship The Great
"Even in uganda"

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Reply
14. ezzahira aghmari zidan
"Same in Morroco"

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Reply
15. Saima Hussain
"Same British/Asian"

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Reply
16. Stacey M
"Same in the Caribbean"

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17. fran haferkamp
"I understand Russians did that in the past, don't know if they still do.."

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18. lolazal1
"@fran haferkamp  many still do"

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19. Franny Michelle1987
"Its funny cause we do that in chile too!"

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Reply
20. mayowa somoye
"in my own family if the person seem older than your parents then its big daddy and big mummy"

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21. Catherine Chang
"Same in Chinese culture too!"

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22. Candice Monique
"Same here Louisiana."

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23. 
Maria Eventine
"Did this when I was a child  so did my peers white UK, which I explained to a friend who was brought up in India she thought it was just an Indian thing then explained it was done in Europe to as mom was Hungarian... So I think it's a very old tradition all over."

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Reply
24. Tiny Freckle
"In NZ it's also a Maori thing"

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25. 
GiGi
"Same in Sri Lanka"

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26. Deniz Whittier
"Same in Turkey - went to a wedding from my ancestral hometown where I was addressed as “my neice” but it wasn’t gendered. I felt liberated for not having to be a girl but just a young person."

**
27. The Barefoot Witch
"My Mother was raised in West Africa and she called her elders Aunty/Uncle. Me and my sister were brought up to do so as well. I used to support a Nigerian man with additional needs. His mother butted heads with my line manager; because the line manager would insist on calling the mother by her first name. I came in and called her “Aunty”, and after telling her that my mother gre up in Cameroon, she only wanted to deal with me regarding her so son’s care."

**
28. H. A
"Same in Lebanon/the Middle East"

**
29. lolazal1
"Every where but western Europe, America and Australia."

**
30. Phil O
"Lol being Nigerian I completely get everything she’s saying. It’s like we have the same mom."

**
31. Blueberyl
"Sounds like my Berber mom."

**
32. Mark Brower
"A lot of people with immigrant parents will immediately relate to “become a doctor, lawyer, or engineer” "

**
Reply
33. oauseer
" @Mark Brower  100%. In Egyptian and Middle Eastern culture it's those 3 jobs only. Anything else isn't worth talking about lool"

**
34. Queen B
"Is it true as she says her mum doesn’t like other black people apart from Nigerians? I see a lit of animosity between black Jamaican and black African people in my neighbourhood. Why this hate?"

**
35. Lena Wagenfuehr
"I love Gina Yashere. I've seen her on lots of British panel.shows, and in one she talked about how her mother is a Brexiteer. Because she got a British passport, she looks down on immigrants, completely forgetting her own recent past. Gina's mum provides her with plenty of material, and this "stranger danger" stuff is GOLD"

**
36. Do We Exist?
"It's great she's open about being a lesbian now. You can't be a true comedian unless you embrace your real self and can joke about it."

**
Reply
37. Paris Van-Del
"Ummm...where you been? She's blew up the closet 20yrs ago or more.🀣🀣🀣"

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Reply
38. Do We Exist?
" @Paris Van-Del

This is the first time I've heard her mention it in one of her shows."

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39. Paris Van-Del
" @Do We Exist?  you've obviously haven't seen all her shows and interviews. I've enjoyed her comedy since the early 2000's when she had a relaxer.🀣🀣"
-snip-
In the context of that comment "a relaxer" means "straightened hair" (hair straightened with chemicals or heat). Click https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bmQseRI2Xs&ab_channel=DeadParrot for a 2018 video of Gina Yashere with "relaxed"  hair. 

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Reply
40. Do We Exist?
" @Paris Van-Del

I admit I haven't seen all of her shows and interviews but I've been watching what I can since 2000 as well and I personally think she was more open about it after she moved to America."

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Reply
41. Do We Exist?
"@Paris Van-Del

And anyway, at the end of the day, it's up to her how and who she wants to be and whenever so I don't really want to discuss in great detail her sexuality and how often she's mentioned it. I'm just happy shes comfortable enough to speak and joke about it."

**
42. Chijoy Phillip
"She definitely has a good Yoruba accent when imitating her mum"

**
43. Serenaissance
"I'm glad Gina is doing so well abroad, British media executives never gave her her dues for the exact reasons she's thriving in the US now"

**
44. Shortblock Flexinit
"I just saw her on Wendy yesterday, and not only is she still with Nina, her mother and Nina are practically best friends. Love it!"
-snip-
This comment was published in May 2021. 

**
45. 
Wolfsong Moondancer
"'You don't know this woman, stranger danger...'. This cracked me up, she's brilliant! πŸ˜†πŸ˜‚πŸ€£"

**
46. John Doa
"Another great British export"

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47. itsjemmabond
"Actually, the kneeling down before your elders only occurs in Yoruba culture."

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48. majda vojnikovic
"Near enough :)"

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49. Thoughts of a Teen
"Nigerian and Yoruba are very often hand in hand"

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Reply
50. Rabibi Lah
" @Thoughts of a Teen  not quite. Yoruba is only one out of 250 cultures in Nigeria."

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Reply
51. Rabibi Lah
"@Thoughts of a Teen  that inaccurate Yoruba is one of 3 major groups but not the only one. Then there’s 250+ other cultures in the same country. It’s like saying a small segment of people represent a whole country. Not all Nigerians kneel for elders (some might curtsy or bend one knee) and only Yoruba men prostrate aka the push up greeting (none of the other ethnicities’ men do that). That’s strictly Yoruba people in the south west"

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52. Eghonghon Imarenezor
"not only Yoruba, I can't speak for other groups in Nigeria but Edo people definitely kneel down."

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53. Kasmir's Daughter
"Not true. It’s simply Nigerian culture. The only difference is Yorubas expect it from everyone. Whereas in other parts of Nigeria it’s only expected for fathers and for when a wife serves her husband his meals for example. My parents did not expect it from us but I had aunties who knelt to serve their husbands. Hausa and Igbo aunties so it’s simply the custom in Nigerian."

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54. Mariah Henderson
"@Kasmir's Daughter  I'm Igbo and you just had to do a slight bow and maybe a handshake while saying "good afternoon(depends on the time) uncle/aunty".

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55. 
itsjemmabond
"@Kasmir's Daughter  That's weird. I'm from Imo, and I seldom saw that."

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56. Mariah Henderson
"@Kasmir's Daughter  I'm Igbo and you just had to do a slight bow and maybe a handshake while saying "good afternoon(depends on the time) uncle/aunty".

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57. Jaypee’s Escape
"No it’s also a delta and Igbo thing. In delta it’s called jigwe. A lot of other culture do the whole prostrating thing but Yourba people carry it on their head (no offense)"

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58. itsjemmabond
"@Jaypee’s Escape  Really? Because I'm Igbo, and I never once came across the kneeling for your elders greeting."

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59. SylviasWorld
"@Eghonghon Imarenezor  Edo's and Yoruba's are historically linked though. There is a culture crossover between the two tribes."

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60. SylviasWorld
"@Kasmir's Daughter  No, it's not 'simply Nigerian culture' actually. In fact for Igbo's its not expected or generally encouraged to bow to your fellow man. Respect to elders in the Igbo culture is more in how you speak to them, how you physically take and give and object etc. You may give a slight nod which lowers your neck and back but that would not qualify as a bow in Yoruba culture in which the prostration or courtesy is very much pronounced. It's just not expected with Igbo's and it's not a lack of respect or rude if you don't for the most part."

**
61. Jacki Moon
"Oh man...I definitely remember the first time I tried to give my Hindu husband’s father a hug.

What a damn fool I was πŸ’€"

**
62. Akanksha Yadav
"In India instead of bowing down we touch elders feet and here also we call every older person aunty and uncle πŸ˜…"

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63. Dr. Markus
"Nigerians and Asians have a ton in common. HAHAHAHA I'm Asian"

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64.  BlackJack XXI
"I'm going through the comments and I'm realising that almost everyone, with a non-Western background, dose the Meat Aunty, Meat Uncle thing.

I'm from πŸ‡΅πŸ‡¬ and thats how we address our elders that could be in our parents generation too.

Now out of curiosity, what would you call your cousins children, do you address them as your Niece and Nephew or are they also Cousins ?"
-snip-
PG= Papua New Guinea
-snip-
The words in bold font were written that way in this comment.

**
65. Mariposaoro Fusion food Channel
"Too funny as always!!! Big up Aunty Graceby(Ginas mum)!! Lovely lady!"

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66. faith mkhize
"I'm South African.... Zulu..... We also don't call our elders by name.... Guess it must be an African thing... 🀣"

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67. Linda Benny
"I LOVE Gina. Come back to the UK soon. We miss you!"

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68. TCt83067695
"So we're not gonna talk about how fly her entire aesthetic is?

Jumpsuit fire.

Necklace thing fire.

Shoes FIYAAAAAH"

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Reply
69. Miss Sophia
"Yeah her outfit is πŸ”₯!!!!! Get it girrrrrl!!!!!"

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70. Jude Obafemi
"Hair too. Accent too. Comedy too.

Everything is πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯"

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71. intldawn
"Gear is ON POINT. She always has the best glasses, too. ❤️

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72. leimoan800
"Her delivery is the bizness🀣😍πŸ₯°πŸ’ƒ"

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73. sora actualize
"yo honestly african parents are like asian parents . when you speak mandarin or cantonese as a non asian person to an asian parent they are soo happy and appreciate you more, when you greet african parents in their local/traditional way they are more loving and warm to you especially in an informal setting and its shocking. i can 100% relate to this with gina here lol when your parents like your friends almost better than you.

**
74. firebrandsgirl
"Black American and I get it also. Hilarious. With us it is speaking when you walk in."

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75. J0any T3st
"We show respect in the Caribbean  to elders by saying aunty and uncle too"

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76. NORMAN OSBORNE
"GINA'S BRAND OF COMEDY ALWAYS HAS ME IN STITCHES..... MASSIVELY POPULAR IN THE U S A.....BUT VERY LIMITED HERE ON HOMETOWN TURF LONDON CITY πŸ’žπŸ’₯πŸ”₯πŸ’•πŸ’žπŸ’₯πŸ”₯πŸ’•πŸ’žπŸ’₯πŸ”₯πŸ’•"

**
77. Shotta Shabazz
"She is extremely funny but one thing I have noticed about her is she is very stylish and fashion conscious. She always has on some Fly Girl attire.πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯"

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78. Simba Miliki
"I'm from East Africa, buy what she's telling doesn't have any difference from my home."

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79. Flo Curlz
"How to impress Nigerian parents.comπŸ˜‚"

**
80. svmac02
"Jamaicans only have the same job options too πŸ˜‚"

**
81. Diane Bebbington
"Aaaaargh!!!! Why doesn't Gina have her own show on British TV? She's hilarious!!!!!!"

**
82. Mary Jane
"My parents are from Eritrea and yeah we don't do a lot of hugging either. The kissing on the cheek left and right for greetings but no hugging.Sometimes I miss it and feel like hugging my parents tightly but by now we have gotten so awkward lol. We are still very close just a bit awkward when it comes to showing affection."

**
83. dracolipop
"As a Chinese, i totally relate to the calling elders, aunty or uncle thing 🀣🀣🀣🀣"

**
84. Suraya Abdullah
"Lots of similarities between Nigerian n Indian (Malaysia)family culture, so I can really relate... πŸ‘"

**
85. Zephyr
"as an african this is so relatable! LOL "

**
86. Kesington Omoniyi
"After all these years she still hella funny.... 🀣🀣🀣"

**
87. danbauchi hauwa
"GinaaaaaπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ so impressive. Much love from another NigerianπŸ‡³πŸ‡¬πŸ‡³πŸ‡¬πŸ‡³πŸ‡¬. The accuracyyyyyyπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️πŸ₯³πŸ₯³πŸ₯³ i loveeeeiiittttt"

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Visiting comments are welcome.

Friday, July 16, 2021

(Tanzanian Singer) Zuchu- "Sukari" (video, information, & English translation)



Zuchu, January 30, 2021

Sukari (Sugar) A Love song That Talks About how Love is too sweet like Sugar that you cant get enough of it! -snip- Statistics as of July 16, 2021 at 8:23 AM ET Total # of views - 45,364,193 Total # of likes - 253K Total # of dislikes - 23K
Total # of comments -18,327 **** Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents information about the Tanzanian singer Zuchu and showcases her hit song "Sukari"

English translation for that song's Swahili lyrics are included in this post along with some editorial comments about this song.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Zuchu for this song. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT ZUCHU
Excerpt #1
From 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zuchu
"
Zuhura Othman Soud (born 22 November 1993[1]), better known by her stage name Zuchu, is a Tanzanian singer[2] and songwriter signed to WCB Wasafi record label.[3][4] She was awarded the Silver Plaque Button by YouTube for hitting 100,000 subscribers within a week.[5] She became the first East African female artist to reach that milestone within a week. She also became the first East African female artist to reach 1 million subscribers on YouTube 11 months later. [6][7] In 2020 Zuchu was named by AFRIMMA as the winner of the Emerging Artist Award.[8]

Personal life

Zuchu comes from a musical family and background. She is a daughter of the revered female Taarab musician Khadija Kopa.[9][10] Zuchu started singing at a tender age and later collaborated with her mother Khadija Kopa on a song titled Mauzauza from her debut EP titled I am Zuchu EP.[11] Among her first appearances as a musician to the public date back to 2015 in the first edition of TECNO OWN THE STAGE in Lagos, Nigeria.[12]

Discography

Zuchu - made her official entrance into the music industry in April 2020[13] and so far has one EP Album.

Albums

Zuchu released her debut EP album I Am Zuchu in 2020, with a total of 7 songs.[14]”…

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Excerpt #2
From https://www.musicinafrica.net/magazine/zuchu-set-rise-under-auspices-diamond-platnumz Zuchu set to rise under the auspices of Diamond Platnumz By Lucy Ilado, 17 Jul 2020 
"Tanzanian singer and songwriter Zuchu is bongo flava’s newest sensation who is fast becoming a formidable force. The ‘Wana’ singer is redefining the genre by positioning herself as one of the top female musicians in the country’s vibrant music scene.

The 23-year-old songstress made headlines when she inked a recording deal with Diamond Platnumz’s Wasafi Classic Baby (WCB), one of East Africa’s top record imprints. The label is now putting its machinery behind the promising musician in an unwavering effort to create the next influential artist – a similar role the recording stable played in producing a catalogue of prominent artists such as Mbosso, Rayvanny and Harmonize. But her journey has only begun.

Zuchu’s endorsement by one of East Africa’s most celebrated artists has earned her sufficient attention from local media and the public. Diamond Platnumz is the model musician who can help Zuchu catapult her career to the top. He’s a prolific artist who has collaborated with home-grown and international artists. The ‘Jeje' hitmaker has also attained a number of other accolades including becoming the first sub-Saharan musician to reach more than one billion views on his YouTube Channel, which has more than 3.6 million subscribers. His third studio album A Boy from Tandale attests to his lyrical prowess and his currency in the market.

The musician has leveraged off the online and offline presence of her fellow signees at WCB who have offered unfaltering support to the singer. Among these supportive artists is the indomitable Diamond Platnumz who, in a number of interviews, described the songstress as one of the most brilliant artists he has encountered. While her vocal instrument remains the centrepiece of her artistry, she is one of the few artists who could deftly walk the complicated line of writing deeply emotive songs he says.

Zuchu’s songwriting style ditches the modern form of bongo flavour, which is followed by most musicians. It has contributed to a shift in the nature and dialect from the contemporary sounds of the genre, but its rooted in the core elements of the genre creating a new type of modern escapism. Her EP encapsulates a versatile, melodic and confident musician with a resounding statement that's telling of an artist who’s ready to make bold moves that transcend East Africa's boundaries.”…

**** LYRICS- SUKARI (English translation)

[composed by Zuhura Soud]

Eyoo Trone
(Iyo Lizer)

Suppose I give him a taste
He tells me sweetness (sweetness)
When I give him some more
He keeps asking for more (some more)

When I feel like he has had enough
He keeps asking for more (some more)
Clearly it's not a secret
It will destroy him

If it's too much it's disastrous (I'm afraid)
When it's less it's dangerous (I'm afraid)
I wouldn't want to cause him harm (I'm afraid)
When he yearns and doesn't get it (I'm afraid)

Cause it might be too much for him (I'm afraid)
The taste of Zanzibar (I'm afraid)
He gets it when he wants it

Ai su-ka-ri (I give him)
Ah sugar, sukari (I give him)
Su-ka-ri (I give him)
Ah sugar, sukari (I give him)

Su-ka-ri (I give him)
Sugar, sukari (I give him)
Su-ka-ri (I give him)
Ah sugar, sukari (I give him)

Yelele, yelele...

And when he's hungry
I don't lazy around
I fill the jar
I fill it with ginger, eh

Daddy chop it, daddy chop it (eeeh)
Take it all, take it all (have it)
Chew and keep on going (eeeh)
Do whatever you desire (have it)

Boost yourself with groundnuts (eeeh)
Take it easy, have a snack (have it)
Beware it might be disastrous
You may suffer

If it's too much it's disastrous (I'm afraid)
When it's less it's dangerous (I'm afraid)
I wouldn't want to cause him harm (I'm afraid)
When he yearns and doesn't get it (I'm afraid)

Cause it might be too much for him (I'm afraid)
The taste of Zanzibar (I'm afraid)
He gets it when he wants it

 Ai su-ka-ri (I give him)
Ah sugar, sukari (I give him)
Su-ka-ri (I give him)
Ah sugar, sukari (I give him)

Su-ka-ri (I give him)
Sugar, sukari (I give him)
Su-ka-ri (I give him)
Ah sugar, sukari (I give him)

Why bewitch him, yet he's already deep in love
Whine, whine!
Taste the sweetness of sugar
Whine, whine!

I say my boo, whine! (whine)
Just whine (whine)
Halua, halua (whine)
You just whine (whine)

I say just whine it (whine)
Just whine (whine)
Bend as if you are washing clothes (whine)
Raise your leg and whine (whine)

 

Online Source: https://lyricstranslate.com/en/sukari-sugar.html
Submitted by ulissescoroaulissescoroa on Thu, 08/04/2021 

A link for the original lyrics that are mostly in Swahili is found on that page.

These same English translated lyrics are given as subtitles in the official YouTube video.  
-snip-
Zuchu's song "Sukari" is clearly about having sex. 

I believe that the word "chop" in the song's lyrics "Daddy chop it" borrowas from Nigerian Pidgin English where that word means "eat".

The English word "whine" refers to the Caribbean associated dance movement of rotating one's pelvis to music in a rhythmic pattern.   

According to my unscientific analysis of much of the discussion thread for the official YouTube video of Zucha's song "Sukari" [as of July 16, 2021 ending around 8:30 AM ET], more than half of the comments are written in KiSwahili, and almost all of the rest of the comments are  written in English. .

Most of the Swahili comments in that video's discussion thread from Kenya, and there are also comments from other East African nations (Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Zambia, & Somali).  I also noted comments from West Africa (Nigeria, Ghana, Camerons, and Liberia). I also noted comments from South Africa (The nation of South African and Zimbabwe) and from Central Africa (The Congo), and Sudan and South Sudan from North East Africa, and Ethiopia from North Africa )

There are other comments in that video's discussion thread from elsewhere in the world including the USA, Russia, France, Germany, Portugal, India, Nepal, China, Saudi Arabia, and Haiti. 

Some but not all of these comments are likely from East Africans and other Africans who live in those non-African nations. Furthermore, most of the comment from outside of East Africa either wrote or otherwise indicated that they didn't understand Swahili, but they really liked the "sweetness" of the singer's voice.

All of the comments from outside of Tanzania attest to the global reach of Zuchu's "Sukari" song.
-snip-
This list of commenter's nations may be incomplete. I apologize if I failed to note all of the commenter's nations.

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