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Monday, January 17, 2022

"I Believe in the Dream"- An Original Song From Gracie's Corner YouTube Channel (A Tribute to Martin Luther King Jr.)



Gracie's Corner, January 12, 2022

"I Believe in the Dream" is an original song dedicated to honoring the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Gracie and all her friends come together to celebrate MLK and his lasting contributions to society. Please join us in honoring this hero.

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Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcase an animated video and song about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

The content of this post is presented for educational, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners   

Thanks to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for his cultural legacy. Thanks to all those associated with Gacie's Corner for this video and song.

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LYRICS FOR "I BELIEVE IN THE DREAM
(from this video's summary)

Ooh, ooh, ooh…. Ooh, ooh.

He was born a Georgia boy, became a leader as a man.

One day he had a dream, where he saw the Promised Land.

A place where we are free and treated equally. 

Together, all as one, in peace and harmony.

He believed in what was right, that love would shine a light,

a light that shines so bright,

takes darkness from the night.

He was brave and took a stand. Believed the change that it would bring.

For this and so much more, we honor Martin Luther King.

Oh, I believe. In the dream, the dream of Martin Luther King. (Believe it, believe it, believe it now)

Oh, I believe. In the dream, the dream of Martin Luther King.

Let’s come together now, let’s come together now.

As one, continue Martin’s dream.

Let’s come together now, let’s come together now.

As one, continue Martin’s dream.

Let’s come together now, let’s come together now.

As one, continue Martin’s dream.

Let’s come together now, let’s come together now.

As one, continue Martin’s dream.

Oh, I believe. In the dream, the dream of Martin Luther King. (Believe it, believe it, believe it now)

Oh, I believe. In the dream, the dream of Martin Luther King.

He was born a Georgia boy, became a leader as a man.

One day he had a dream, where he saw the Promised Land.

A place where we are free and treated equally. 

Together, all as one, in peace and harmony.

He believed in what was right, that love would shine a light,

a light that shines so bright,

takes darkness from the night.

He was brave and took a stand. Believed the change that it would bring.

For this and so much more, we honor Martin Luther King.

Oh, I believe. In the dream, the dream of Martin Luther King. (Believe it, believe it, believe it now)

Oh, I believe. In the dream, the dream of Martin Luther King. (Believe it, believe it, believe it now)

Let’s come together now, let’s come together now.

As one, continue Martin’s dream.

Let’s come together now, let’s come together now.

As one, continue Martin’s dream.

Let’s come together now, let’s come together now.

As one, continue Martin’s dream.

Let’s come together now, let’s come together now.

It lives in you and me.

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Zion Christian Chuches' Mokhukhu Choirs (information and videos)


Nyiko Chris Mathebula, Jun 5, 2015
-snip-
A commenter wrote that this video was recorded in 1994.

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Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents general information about Southern Africa's Zion Christian Church.

Four YouTube videos of Mokhukhu performances in South Africa and one YouTube video of a Mokhukhu performance in Botswana are also included in this post.

The content of this post is presented for religious, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the Mokhukhu members of Zion Christian Church. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube. 
-snip-
Clic
https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/01/general-information-about-southern.html for the closely related pancocojams post entitled "General Information About (Southern Africa's) Zion Christian Church (Article Excerpts)."

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INFORMATION ABOUT ZION CHRISTIAN CHURCHES' MOKHUKHU CHOIRS
Excerpt #1
From 
http://dictionary.sensagent.com/zion%20christian/en-en/
..."There are several formations within the ZCC which have been created to provide prayer and communion forums for members. The main ones are Mokhukhu, the Female Choir, the Male Choir, the Brass Band, and Nkedi. Mokhukhu is generally regarded by members as the most important of all the groups.

The origins of Mokhukhu

In Sepedi the word mokhukhu means a "shack" or "shanty." In Zion City Moria - the headquarters of the ZCC - situated some 40 kilometres (25 mi) east of Polokwane (previously Pietersburg) in the Limpopo (previously Northern Province) Province, there are many such shacks.3 The manner in which the word mokhukhu came to be applied to a dominant formation within the ZCC lies in the early history of conflicts within the church. After Engenas Lekganyane's death in 1948, Joseph, his son and appointed heir, succeeded him as the leader of the church. However, Joseph's older brother, Edward, contested this with the help of some church members. Traditional custom was in his favor as the older brother, for among the Bapedi the eldest son succeeds his father. It is said that, as a way of intimidating Joseph's followers, the pro-Edward faction burned the shacks in which Joseph's supporters lived. When each shack was ablaze, the Edward faction danced and sang a song containing the words u yasha umkhukhu (a shack is burning). This song, which was isiZulu, was begun by pro-Edward migrant workers based in what was then known as the Reef. The dancing pattern they formed eventually became popular within the branch that the Edward camp established after the conflict and came to be known as Mokhukhu. The name now refers to both the dance pattern and to the group that performs the dance."...

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EXCERPT #2
From http://www.atiner.gr/presentations/Simon-Moripe.pdf

AUTHOR: SIMON. MORIPE

INSTITUTION: UNIVERSITY OF LIMPOPO – SOUTH AFRICA [no publishing date given; retrieved Jan 17, 2022]

MUSIC AND DANCE

• The height of the ZCC calendar is the Annual Easter pilgrimage to Moriah.

• The Mokhukhu dancers are conspicuous in their uniform and attract thousands of spectators.

• At Moriah they normally compete against each other, but not necessary for a prize or a reward.

[...]

On the streets and sidewalks of South Africa, members of Mokhukhu dance

are instantly recognisable.

• They all wear their white boots, khaki suits, khaki shirts, black tie, and a

black cap with a silver five-pointed star on the forehead, with letters ZCC,

sown on a small strip of green baize cloth and proudly pinned to their

clothes.

• Mokhukhu simply means a shelter, a place giving protection from danger or a place providing

food and accommodation.

• The Mokhukhu musical group is indeed a place of safety within the structures of the ZCC.

• The communal dance by male adherents involves leaping energetically into air and coming down

firmly on both feet, with much jollification and rhythmic movement.

• It is a very rigorous dance.

• These men are able to sing for the whole night with only few intervals for tea and coffee without

sugar and milk, which is prayed for.

• Mokhukhu dance is above all a healing dance, epitomizing the characteristics of sharing and egalitarianism.

• It provides healing in the most generic sense: it may cure a sick body or mind as the healer pulls out sickness by laying on hands; mend the social fabric as the dance promotes social cohesion and a manageable release of hostility.

• Mokhukhu dance is an act of worship.

• The Mokhukhu dance provides an outlet to the emotional expression of religious life and is a powerful means of communication in African traditional life.

• It helps to express fellowship and participation in life. It also helps to reduce stress and depression."...

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SHOWCASE VIDEO #2: Mosesetjane kosha

Langa Ralph, July 17, 2019

Kosha

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SHOWCASE VIDEO #3: @ mississippi with Ivory park



mamphi mcdonald, Dec 8, 2020

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SHOWCASE VIDEO #4: ZCC mokhukhu Botswana11


Keemisitswe Ngaka, October 2, 2019

Mokhukhu BOTS

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SHOWCASE VIDEO #5: Zcc Mokhukhu | Zcc Mokhukhu Songs | Zcc


Music Club, May 3, 2021

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General Information About (Southern Africa's) Zion Christian Church (Article Excerpts)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents general information about Southern Africa's Zion Christian Church.

The content of this post is presented for historical, religious, and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the founders, leaders, and other members of Zion Christian Church. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post. 
-snip-
Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/01/zion-christian-chuches-mokhukhu-choirs.html for a closely related pancocojams post entitled "
Zion Christian Chuches' Mokhukhu Choirs (information and videos)."

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ARTICLE EXCERPTS: GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT ZION CHRISTIAN CHURCH

These  excerpts are presented in no particular order and are numbered for referencing purposes only.

EXCERPT #1
From http://dictionary.sensagent.com/zion%20christian/en-en/
"The Zion Christian Church (ZCC), founded in 1910 by Engenas Lekganyane, is the largest of the African indigenous churches in South Africa.

The ZCC belongs to the so-called independent churches of South Africa - described as independent because they are not under white control. (Lukhaimane 1980:1) The Zionist churches did not break away directly from the mission establishment; their origins lie, instead, in Zion City, Illinois, where John Alexander Dowie (1847-1907) founded the Christian Catholic Church in 1896. The influence of his church spread to South Africa in 1904 when Daniel Bryant baptized several Africans. (see Lukhaimane 1980:14)

Independent Ethiopian churches, on the other hand, have their roots in the history of resistance to the imperial system. In the thinking of many white missionaries, the success of Christianization depended on Westernization, and they intertwined religious conversion with the imposition of new cultural norms. This, inevitably, led to the phenomenon of cultural deprivation among African converts. As a consequence, in the second half of the 19th century some converts attempted to protect and perpetuate certain aspects of African culture. For example, the rise of nativistic sentiment prompted the Reverend Nehemiah Tile to break away from the Methodist Church in 1884. The Ethiopian movement in South Africa is often traced to this event, because thereafter the breakaway church movement gained momentum.

The separatist movement was not just a rejection of alien cultural values, it was also aimed at revitalizing the African society which colonial conquest had rendered ineffectual. According to some scholars, the separatist movement can be seen as the struggle of the African to assert his significance as a human being. This significance he knew very well in his home before his culture was disrupted by the impact of Western culture. He had had to surrender it in the face of overwhelming and awe-inspiring wonders of the White man. He was then left without purpose, and his degeneration as a human being began. The Separatist Churches restore this sense of purpose. (Vilakazi, Mthethwa, and Mpanza 1986:17-18) To this end, indigenous customs were, and continue to be, grounded within a Christian framework in the independent churches.

According to Lukhaimane, the ZCC arose out of personal differences between Engenas Lekganyane and the elders of the Zion Apostolic Church and the Zion Apostolic Faith Mission - churches of which Lekganyane was once a member (1980:2). Thus the formation of the ZCC was a "Black from Black" secession (Lukhaimane 1980:2). What places the ZCC firmly within the separatist or independent movement and closely links it to the Ethiopian churches is not provenance, but a common emphasis on the retention of certain African customs and norms.

As a Zionist organization, the ZCC is characterized by an emphasis on divine and faith healing, purification rites, dancing, night communion, river baptism, the holy spirit, prophesying, and so on.1 There are several formations within the ZCC which have been created to provide prayer and communion forums for members. The main ones are Mokhukhu, the Female Choir, the Male Choir, the Brass Band, and Nkedi. Mokhukhu is generally regarded by members as the most important of all the groups."...
-snip-
This article indicates that its source was Wikipedia's page on Zion Christian Church. However, the January 17, 2022 edition of that page is different from what is quoted here.

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EXCERPT #2
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engenas_Lekganyane [retrieved Jan 17, 2022]
…[Engenas] "Lekganyane's ZCC was similar to other Zionist churches in that it emphasized faith healing to win converts. Lekganyane himself is known to have healed a large number of people. During the early years of the ZCC he allowed his followers to engage in faith healing as well. In 1930, however, he took sole control of all faith healing as the church expanded. Items such as water and paper were “blessed” at his home base, and then sent out to distant congregations where they were ingested or touched by the afflicted. Lekganyane also sanctioned traditional practices such as polygamy and ancestor worship.[11] The latter practice, in particular, was to prove effective in turning the ZCC into a dynamic fund-raising machine. Throughout Lekganyane's lifetime the church was primarily oral in nature. The ZCC did not generate sacred writings, and Lekganyane's sermons and pronouncements were not written down. Faith healing, testimony, singing, and dancing were instead the focus of worship services.”…

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EXCERPT #3
From 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zion_Christian_Church [retrieved Jan 17, 2022]
..."Following Engenas Lekganyane's death in 1948, a major split in the church occurred. The church's large section of male migrant workers generally backed Engenas's oldest surviving son, the charismatic Edward Lekganyane, to succeed his father as the ZCC Bishop. The church's rural base, meanwhile, backed a younger son, Joseph, to assume church leadership. Although events are highly disputed, Engenas himself appears to have favoured Joseph even though Edward was the chosen one— who served as his father's adviser and chauffeur during the 1940s. According to some traditions, during Engenas Lekganyane's mourning period, Edward's supporters mobilised on the Witwatersrand and hired buses to take them to Moria. After arrival, this large, armed group was able to eject the pro-Joseph faction and take over the church's headquarters and infrastructure.[8] Contemporary records relating to the event show that Edward was installed peacefully in Easter 1949 in a large ceremony by his uncle, Reuben. Other written reports from the following year indicate that strong opposition to his leadership had arisen among "most of the preachers" in the ZCC who were "shocked" by Edward: "they denied the son of the great Lekganyane, saying he was not leader of the church."[9]Initially the two factions remained together, but Edward soon insisted that all members declare their loyalty in public, and this led to a permanent split. The ZCC continued under Edward's leadership, while Joseph seceded and formed the St. Engenas Zion Christian Church in 1949.

The ZCC changed fairly dramatically following his son Edward Lekganyane's assumption of control of the church in April 1949. Edward was a highly educated, flamboyant figure who eventually obtained a degree at an Afrikaans divinity school.[10] Under his leadership the all-male Mokhukhu organisation developed out of his core group of supporters. This group initially formed as a church choir. Wearing military-style khakis, police-style hats, and the Star badge, the Mokhukhu in each congregation engaged in dancing, singing, and praying three times a week according to a preset schedule.[11] An additional feature of Edward's control of the ZCC was the rapid growth of Zion City Moria as a pilgrimage site. Using the Boyne farm that his father had purchased in the 1940s, Edward instituted annual pilgrimages that have gone on to become massive southern African-wide events. Each year during Easter Holidays, up to a million Church members bus en masse to Moria, Polokwane (Pietersburg) to meet the Bishop and to pray for blessings.[12]

Characteristics of the ZCC

The belief that the religious and administrative leader of the church (or bishop) is a mediator between the congregation and God through Jesus Christ; that, like Christ, he can perform supernatural acts and faith-healing in the name of Lord Jesus Christ.

The belief that senior officials in the ZCC (known as baruti) can use the power of the Holy Spirit to perform healing. [2]

The use of different mechanisms for faith-healing. These include the laying-on of hands; the use of holy water; drinking of blessed tea and coffee; the wearing of blessed cords or cloth.

The colours of the church are green, yellow/gold, khakhi, white, blue, maroon and brown.

Green and yellow suit is for men and women and they call it 'seaparo se segolo', khakhi suit is for Mokhukhu (with star badge) or wear by men in Saint Engenas (with dove badge), blue suit is for women and they call it 'khwaere ya bomme' and they used to wear it on Sundays. There is khakhi suit with green jersey for 'khwaere ya bomme' and they wear it on Saturday. Brown suit is for men and women who are singing 'Nkedi', maroon and white is for Zion City members who helped with church activities.”…

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Information About African Independent Churches In Southern Africa & Information And Videos Of Nazareth Baptist Church Denomination Of South Africa



Sbonelo McDee, Oct. 20, 2011

The leaders of Nazareth Baptist Church-Ebuhleni in sequence.

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Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents information about African Independent Churches (AIC) in Southern Africa as well as information about Nazareth Baptist Church denomination which may be the oldest AIC in Southern  Africa. The Nazareth Baptist Church is known by several other names including Shembe's Church, after the last name of its founder. 

Several videos of Nazareth Baptist Church are showcased in this post, with a focus on the garments worn by church members and other ways that the members presented/present themselves for religious activities and/or in the general public.

The content of this post is presented for historical, religious, and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the founder, leaders, and other members of Nazareth Baptist Church in Southern Africa, and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.
-snip-
Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/01/karen-h-brown-white-robes-for-worship.html for the closely related pancocojams post entitled "Karen H Brown - "White Robes For Worship: The Umnazaretha of the Nazareth Baptist Church In South Africa" (journal reprint with a few notes)."

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INFORMATION ABOUT AFRICAN INDEPENDENT CHURCHES (AIC)
From https://www.patheos.com/library/african-independent-churches
..."African Independent Churches, also known as African Indigenous Churches, African Initiated Churches, African Instituted Churches, or just AICs, represent well over 10,000 independent Christian denominations in Africa. African Independent Churches are found in every region and country in Africa, but they are more adequately documented in west Africa and southern Africa. Even though the denominational, ritual, and linguistic diversity of these churches makes it difficult to analyze and classify, the common thread uniting all of the Christian churches is that they were all established by African initiative rather than by foreign missionary agendas. Even though many of these churches have traditional denominational names and relationships, they are not defined by these traditions. These churches emphasize that they are established and led by Africans. In addition, all AICs place emphasis on the biblical warrant to include African cultural norms into their modes of worship, theology, and practice, though to varying degrees."... 

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INFORMATION ABOUT NAZARETH BAPTIST CHURCH OF SOUTH AFRICA
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nazareth_Baptist_Church
"The Nazareth Baptist Church (Alternatively called "The Nazarite Church" "iBandla lamaNazaretha") is the second largest, African initiated church based in South Africa, founded in 1910.[1]

It reveres Shembe as a prophet sent by God to restore the teachings of Moses, the prophets, and Jesus. Members are Sabbath-observers and avoid pork, smoking, and premarital sex.[2]

It was divided into two groups after the 1976 death of Johannes Galilee Shembe. The larger group was led by Bishop Amos Shembe until his death in 1995, while Rev. Londa Shembe led the smaller group.[3]

As of 2009, it was divided into three factions in KwaZulu-Natal and one in Gauteng.[4]

The religion uses leopard skins as part of their ceremonies, which some activists are trying to stop or replace with synthetic leopard skin.[5]

On 18 October 2016, the KwaZulu-Natal High Court in Durban declared Vela Shembe the legitimate leader of the Nazareth Baptist Church after a protracted court battle, which had dragged on since 2011.[6] Despite this, the previous leader's son Mduduzi Shembe, who lives in the large village of Ebuhleni, remains the de facto head of the church and most church members have ignored the ruling.[7]"...
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The largest African Independent Church denomination in Southern African is probably Zion Christian Church (ZCC). Here's information about Zion Christian Church (ZCC) from https://kids.britannica.com/kids/article/Zion-Christian-Church/602331#:~:text=The%20ZCC%20was%20founded%20in,Edward%20took%20over%20as%20bishop.
"The Zion Christian Church (ZCC) is one of the largest churches in southern Africa. Its headquarters are in Zion City, Moria, in the Limpopo province of South Africa. The ZCC has about 7 million members in the following African countries: Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Eswatini (formerly Swaziland), Zambia, and Zimbabwe."
-snip-
Click https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zion_Christian_Church  for more information about Zion Christian Church in Southern Africa.

Neither Zion Christian Church members nor Nazareth Baptist Church members perform circular walking and spinning dances that are performed by some Zionist church denominations in Southern Africa.  

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SHOWCASE VIDEO #2: Nazareth Baptist Church-EBuhleni

[Warning- One very brief scene of female frontal nudity is included in this video.]



Sbonelo McDee, Sep 8, 2012

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SHOWCASE VIDEO #3: Shembe Walk to God

[Warning- One very brief scene of female frontal nudity is included in this video.]

African Lotus Productions, May 19, 2020

At the beginning of every year, thousands of members of the Nazareth Baptist Church, or the “Shembe Church” as they are more commonly called, embark on a 70km pilgrimage to a Holy Mountain in rural Kwa-Zulu Natal. They leave from Inanda, just north of Durban, and walk barefoot in their traditional white attire; braving KZN’s scorching heat or unpredictable rain. They walk on searing hot tarmac or on the prickly dirt roads of the hinterland, singing the praises of their founder Isaiah Shembe or of God stopping sometimes for a break or overnight just in fields along the road. They travel for three days until they finally reach Nlangakazi, their holy mountain, where it is said God spoke to their founder almost a hundred years ago. The program looks at the faith of Shembe people through the context of the pilgrimage - examining their core beliefs and practices while showcasing their courage, perseverance and strength of character that is evident in the Shembe Walk to God.

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