Translate

Saturday, May 8, 2021

Two "Come And See My Moda" TikTok Challenge Compilations (along with the official YouTube "Come See My Moda" video)


SORO SOKE MEDIA TV, Mar 30, 2021

****
This pancocojams post showcases two YouTube videos of Tik Tok challenge compilations of the Ghanaian/Nigerian song "Come See My Moda".

Selected comments are included in this post from the discussion thread for the first video that is embedded in this post.

The Addendum of this post showcases the official 2018 YouTube video of "Come See My Moda" by MzVee featuring Yemi Alade.

The content of this post is presented for cultural and entertainment purposes.

This post also serves as a salute and thank you to all mothers and all those who mother others.

Thanks to MzVee and Yemi Alade for their January 2018 Afrobea song and video "Come And See My Moda". Thanks to all those who are featured in these videos and thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

Happy Mother's Day!

****
VIDEO #2


TIKTOK LAGOS, April 16, 2021

****
SELECTED COMMENTS 
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pZnRqup2fU&ab_channel=SOROSOKEMEDIATV1

1. Kevin Honest, April 2021
"Shout out to all moms πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–"

**
2. Kevin Honest, April 2021
"I love the African vibe and happy birthday to some of the  moms in this video"

**
3. TEQUILA, April 2021
"3:43 WOW YOUR MOTHER IS 122 YEARS OLD HEYI GOD BLESS YOU MOTHER FOR LIVING SUCH A LONG LIFE πŸ˜€πŸ˜€πŸ˜€πŸ˜€πŸ˜‡πŸ˜‡πŸ˜‡"

**
Reply
4. Endowed Dominic, May 2021
"That's his grandmama I guess...

A very beautiful and strong mama"

****

ADDENDUM- "COME SEE MY MODA" ( official YouTube video)


Lynx Entertainment, Jan 12, 2018
-snip-
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/07/mzvee-ft-yemi-alade-come-and-see-my.html for a July 2018 pancocojams post entitled "MzVee ft Yemi Alade - Come and See My Moda (Official Video & Lyrics)". 

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Friday, May 7, 2021

Trends In Black Girls' Hairstyles: Sho Madjozi Hairstyles (South African Singer/Rapper Sho Madjozi's Influence On Black Girls' Hairstyles)



COLORS,  August 15, 2019

South African based artist Sho Madjozi shares a vibrant performance of previously unreleased single ‘John Cena’

****
Edited by Azizi Powell

Latest revision: May 8, 2021

This pancocojams post presents information and comments about South African singer Sho Madjozi's influence on hairstyles for Black girls.

This post showcases the August 2019 video of Sho Madjozi wearing pink colored weave (fake hair) in her long braid extensions. 

The popularity of Madjozi's "John Cena" video appears to have been the spark that started this neon colored braided hair weave trend among some Black pre-teen girls, some teenage girls, and among some Black younger girls in South Africa and elsewhere, including in the United States. 

This post also showcases a December 2019 real life video of a South African girl who is upset because her newly braided hair isn't styled like Sho Madjozi's hair. Selected comments from that video are included in this post along with excerpts from several South African articles about the influence of Sho Madjozi on South African girls' hair styles.

The content of this post is presented for cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners. 

Thanks to Sho Madjozi for her musical and cultural influence. Thanks to all those who are associated with these embedded videos and thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.
-snip-
Click 
http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2020/05/south-african-rappersinger-sho-madjozi.html for the May 2020 pancocojams post entitled "(South African Rapper) Sho Madjozi - "John Cena" (Information, Video, Lyrics + English Translations, & Explanations)".

****
DISCLAIMER #1
This pancocojams post shouldn't be interpreted as indicating or suggesting that South African rapper/singer Sho Madjozi was the first person (celebrity or otherwise) to wear colored synthetic hair in her braids.

There are videos of other people with that hairstyle before Sho Madjozi's 2019 "John Cena" YouTube video.* However, as the articles and discussion threads I have quoted in this post indicate, it's accurate to credit Sho Madjozi for popularizing that hairstyle in South Africa.
-snip-
*For example, in a brief review of YouTube tutorials for Black females' braid hairstyles and YouTube photograph compilations of Black females' braid hairstyle styles, I found this June 28, 2017 video "
How I did my Daughter Box Braids" that shows the young girl with "rainbow" box braids: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Isx6wk9oJ4&ab_channel=Tish%27sLifestyle

I also found this 
Jul 4, 2018 YouTube photograph compilation entitled 40 Amazing Braided Hairstyles for Black American Womenhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F_ykIismF4g&ab_channel=JessyStyles. That compilation includes a number of hairstyles that include synthetic color braids. 

 ** 
DISCLAIMER #2
This post isn't meant to be a definitive statement about hairstyles in South Africa, in the United States, or elsewhere.

I'm not a hairstylist. Additions and corrections are welcome.

****
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTES
Sho Madjozi also has worn her hair in multiple braids with different color cowrie shells sewed into the ends of those long braids, but that's not the hairstyle that South African commenters [in the discussion thread of Video #2 in this post] are talking about their daughters wanting.

****
On a personal note, my seven year old granddaughter sometimes wears one color or two colors feed into her box braided* hair (extensions). My granddaughter had been asking for this hairstyle, but my daughter wasn't going to allow her to wear weaves until she was age ten. However, since my granddaughter has had to give up so much during this pandemic, my daughter relented because she decided that this was something easy that her daughter could look forward to. When my granddaughter wears this hairstyle, she wears one or two colors that my daughter interweaves with her hair so that you can see her daughter's black hair color.

Although my daughter and granddaughter are familiar with Sho Madjozi's "John Cena"  video, they don't call that colored weave hairstyle "Sho Madjozi". I don't know if anyone in the United States does.  
-snip-
*Here's an excerpt about "box braids" from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Box_braids
"
Box braids are a type of hair-braiding style that is predominantly popular amongst black people (people of African descent). This type of hairstyle is a "protective style" (a style which can be worn for a long period of time to let natural hair grow and protect the ends of the hair) and is "boxy", consisting of square-shaped hair divisions. Box braids are generally installed by using synthetic hair which helps to add thickness as well as helping the natural hair that is in the braid. Because they are not attached to the scalp like other similar styles such as cornrows, box braids can be styled in a number of different ways. The installation process of box braids can be lengthy, but once installed they can last for six to eight weeks. They are known for being easy to maintain.[1][2]

[...]

History

Hair-braiding styles were used to help differentiate tribes, locations, and also possibly a symbol of wealth and power due to the amount of effort that went into styling braids.[3] Box braids were not given a specific name until the 1990s when popularized by R&B musician Janet Jackson, but have been used for years. This style of braiding comes from the Eembuvi braids of Namibia or the chin-length bob braids of the women of the Nile Valley from over 3,000 years ago.[3] The mothers in the tribes would teach their young daughters how to braid each other's hair, and this became a social activity for the tribes.[4] Box Braids are also commonly worn by the Khoi-San people of South Africa[5] and the Afar people in the horn of Africa.[6]"....
-snip-
The statement about Janet Jackson probably refers to the hairstyle that she wore and popularized in the 1993 movie Poetic Justice. She co-starred in that movie with the highly regarded rapper Tupac.  

****
"Feed in braid with color extensions" appears to be the most often used description that I found on YouTube for the hair styles that are the focus of this pancocojams post. Some of the videos are of Black girls/women and some are of White girls/women. Here are two YouTube video examples: 

"How to Feedin, Extend and Custom Color Braids | Braid School Ep. 05",  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stodAY8XuIA&ab_channel=VandyVanity , Oct. 21, 2019

"Pink & Purple Knotless Box Braids | Little Girl Box Braids | How To Do Knotless Braids" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ei7uhzjFUeI&ab_channel=XaraFiore. published by Xara Fiore, Jul 26, 2020.

****
TWO ARTICLE EXCERPTS ABOUT SHO MADJOZI'S HAIRSTYLES INFLUENCING SOUTH AFRICAN GIRLS

Excerpt #1
From https://citizen.co.za/lifestyle/entertainment/celebrity-news/2372376/moms-heres-how-you-can-recreate-sho-madjozis-new-hairstyle/  By Thami Kwazi", 19 Oct 2020
"The Huku singer has perfected the art of the cornrow, and she is a style trendsetter who's often seen wearing different styles of cornrows.

"Singer Sho Madjozi – whose real name is Maya Wegerif – debuted her new style that is a vast variation from her usual brightly coloured cornrows to now a darker natural black.

Wearing a new style often referred to as straight-up, the singer attached colourful beads to the ends which had all hairstyle followers asking about the beads she used. Parents were all over her posts asking where they can get the beads or have the style done.

The cornrow style can be achieved with or without hair extensions and the recommended length of time that it should be kept in is two weeks. Due to the nature of styling in Mzansi salons, many moms who follow Madjozi’s styles prefer to have their daughters’ plaited by informal hairstylists who mainly gather on street squares running makeshift salons.

The advantage of this is informal street stylists are versed in many forms of plaiting and price is negotiable. A child’s style will never cost more than R100, and it’s likely to stay at R80 depending on the size of the cornrows. If using extensions, parents are asked to buy their own hairpiece adding more work for them.

[…]

The easiest solution for moms who would rather have a qualified professional tend to their child’s hair, is to go to a formal salon such as Sorbet, Candi&Co, or Lajawi hair in Midrand or Bryanston which now has a specialist children’s salon that caters to little people and their parents.

Salon owner and lead stylist Jawad, who’s partnered up with another salon to open Royal Kids powered by LaJawi, says the kids’ natural hair market is huge.

“Sho Madjozi’s braids are the most requested among little girls and their moms,” says Jawad, adding natural hair is the healthier way to grow hair and just requires a switch-up every few weeks.”…
-snip-
The term "hairpiece" appears to mean something different in the United States than it does in South Africa (based on the discussion thread comments given in this post). Also, I don't believe that the term "straight up" that is mentioned in Excerpt #1 below is used in the United States.

****
Excerpt #2
From https://www.iol.co.za/lifestyle/style-beauty/hair/our-kids-have-been-influenced-sho-madjozi-changes-up-her-braids-just-in-time-for-school-holidays-d8fe2251-15ae-4e0b-b2f2-4197b5a54 "Our kids have been influenced: Sho Madjozi changes up her braids just in time for school holidays" By Lifestyle Reporter Time of article published Oct 19, 2020

"Every time local rapper Sho Madjozi changes her hairstyle, children run to their parents with a picture of her, saying: “I want this.”

She’s become the biggest influencer for little girls when it comes to braids. In most cases, hair stylists are happy to oblige.

With school holidays around the corner, the “John Cena” rapper has braided her hair in a fun, playful style – something that can be easily replicated by her little fans.

Taking to Twitter, Madjozi shared a video of herself with her new hairstyle.

But there is one catch. It took her three hours to sew in each cowrie shell, she admitted.

[Video insert of Sho Madjozi with her hair with no colored weave, but with small plastic cowrie shells in different colors at the end of many braids.]

This wasn’t lost on Twitter folk. Many parents shared their frustrations with the rapper, saying that their kids would want the same style.

“Sesi our kids are going to nag us hle,” said one mom.

“There's a war brewing between kids and their parents wanting another Sho Madjozi hairstyle,” mentioned another user.”…

****
VIDEO #2


Mzansi's Greatest Family, December 25, 2019
Sho Madjozi's hairstyle almost ruined our Christmas 🀣🀣🀣 -snip- Selected comments from this video's discussion thread (with numbers added for referencing purposes only.). 1. mega yeti, 2019
"Cut someone give us a English summary πŸ˜…"

**
Reply
2/ Mzansi's Greatest Family, 2019
"family about to go out for Christmas gathering and the daughter Momo doesn't want to go because the hairstyle isn't the right one, She wants Sho Madjozi (the artist) hairstyle πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ momy and daddy trying to convince her that it is the rightful one."
-snip-
This Black South African family appears to be middle class, if not above middle class. One clue is that the father is filmed parking his Land Rover [SUV] and rushing into his home to see what is wrong with his daughter Momo. Momo appears to me to be five or six years old. In the United States, her hairstyle would be described as box [?] braid (extensions) worn as a long pony tail with some colored beads attached to a few of those individual braids. This is definitely not the Sho Madjozi style of one or more color braid extensions plaited into a person's hair.     

**
3. lilian lilly, 2019
"Someone translate please. I only know sho madjozi"

**
Reply
4. hope boledi, 2019 "The kid want mixed colours hairpiece especially pink one like sho majozi" ** Reply 5. Nothando Bontle, 2020 "The kid wants the Sho majozi hairstyleπŸ˜…"

**
6. Swt Koey, 2019
"Raise your hand if you only understand Sho Madjozi part"

**
Reply 
7. waithira mburu, 2019
"πŸ˜… πŸ˜… πŸ˜… πŸ˜… πŸ˜…"

**
Reply 
8. Zaakir Jardine, 2019
"Lol I’m assuming she wants her hair to be like Sho Madjozi? Aaah cmon 😌get it for her."

**
Reply 
9. Keisha Lombe, 2019
"πŸ™‹‍♀️πŸ™‹‍♀️πŸ™‹‍♀️πŸ™‹‍♀️πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ’€"

**
Reply 
10. Mandilakhe Nyokana, 2020
"✋🏽✋🏽✋🏽✋πŸ½πŸ˜…πŸ˜…"

**
Reply
11. gamer girl, 2021
"πŸ€£πŸ€£πŸ€£πŸ€£πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ€šπŸ€šπŸ€š"

**
12. Confidence Ramohapeloa, 2019
"She wanted the neon colours πŸ˜ƒπŸ˜ƒπŸ˜ƒ the whole family came to a stand still"

**
13. Humbulani Madzena, 2019
"Sho majozi's hairstyle ya tla ya re bakela

My daughter had the hairstyle for december and i dont even like different colours on hair but i got home from work and my child had the hairstyle (her aunt took her the salon without me knowing)"
-snip-
Google translate from Zulu to English: "ya tla ya re bakela" = "it came to us"

**
Reply
14. Candy Queen, 2019
"Were you angry?"

**
Reply
15. Humbulani Madzena, 2019
"BlacChoc Chic No i wasn't angry neither was i pleased!"

**
16. Vuvu M2, 2019
"I saw this on Twitter and died πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ such a great family! Daddy went from not knowing who sho madjozi is to confirming that this hairstyle is sho madjozi."

**
17. That Girl Tee, 2019
"My daughtet! I had to run around town looking for pink hair piece. She was so excited"

**
18. Melba Kamwaza, 2019
"Shes not happy wth the hairstyle shes saying it dsent look lyk Sho Madjozi's...bt the parents still insists  it does..myb she wanted mor colours in it

**
19. desre Nkhumane, 2019
"Staged?"

**
Reply
20. Estelle Kendall, 2019
"desre Nkhumane aww no I don’t think so look at her little face crying 😩πŸ₯° she’s too cute"

**
21. Khensani Maswanganyi, 2019
"πŸ˜‚πŸ€£πŸ€£haw mara this is not Sho Madjozi we ain't going nowhere till she gets Sho Madjozi"

**
22. Mxolisi Mxo Skiits, 2019
"This is not sho madjozi hairstyle but why vele the mama say it sho madjozi hairstyle, nowadays mama  they don't know youth hairstyle"

**
23. Ayanda Tshatshi, 2019
"πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚sho madjozi is a big influencer bathing"
-snip-
"Bathing" is either a typo or it means the same thing as "bathing":
From https://africtionary.com/definition.php?word=Bathong#:~:text=Word%20used%20to%20express%20disbelief%2C%20surprise%2C%20dissatisfaction.

“Country: South Africa

Bathong: Word used to express disbelief, surprise, dissatisfaction.

Bathong, that's so crazy.by: Mr Trends, 30 November 2020”

**
24. Queen Magomani, 2019
"πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚So I’m not the only one going through this.🀣🀣🀣 Sho Madjozi has caused things."

**
25. phindile ndlovu, 2019
"My daughter cried for Sho Madjozi hairstyle"

**
Reply
26. Lebogang prudence, 2019
"phindile ndlovu sane here  , Sho Majozi has taken over 🀣🀣"
-snip-
"sane" = typo for the English word "same".

**
27. Nwa MJ, 2019
"Sho Madjozi is killing our kids xem! I had to through this on my daughter.. I bought her two pairs of sneakers, Converse n Addidas for my surprise she didn't wear both, she said straight to my face that she want sho Madjozi's shoes. Mind you I don't know the name I googled until I found out that it's Nike... Ohhh my God!!! This kids"

**
28. Elisa Post, 2019
"I'm so happy to see I'm not the only mother going through his joh sho Madjozi did something else to our girls wth that song of John cena"

**
29. hellen maphalakasi, 2019
"She not the only one crying....i ended up buying my sister child purple hairpiece cause she refuse to put a black one.....she show me flames hey"

**
30. QWERTY T, 2019
"πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚Bro I'm glad sho madjozi's hairstyles didn't trend when I still in school"

**
31. That Girl Tee, 2019
"
My daughtet! I had to run around town looking for pink hair piece. She was so excited"

**
32. King Denny X, 2019
"Twitter has spoken.

She's getting her sho Madjozi"

**
33. Gugu Mpanza, 2019
"Please guys its December, do Sho Madjozi style for her please...she wanted pink extensions bakithi plese "Menzeni Boh" Please🀦‍♀️🀦‍♀️ πŸ™πŸ™"

**
Reply
34. Mzansi's Greatest Family, 2019
"Done πŸ‘Œ"
-snip-
Click https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLFXUccAfsM&ab_channel=Mzansi%27sGreatestFamily for a Dec. 29, 2019 Mzansi Family video which shows Momo with her hair styled in green colored "Sho Madjozi" braids. 

**
Reply
35. Gugu Mpanza, 2019
"@Mzansi's Greatest Family  Hahahahahahahahaha, I'm happy ke πŸ€—πŸ€—"

**
36. Thobile Mbatha, 2019
"Same thing happened at a salon just before Christmas in Durban the father had to ask Dat they must re do the child's braids to sho majozi πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚coz bundle of joy was crying n saying it's not sho majozi"

**
37. Morongwa Florinah, 2019
"Yooh,!my 4yrs old daughter wanted the pink and purple, nothing else,,I didn't like those colours but she cried until I allow her to do it...yoh show majozi"

**
38. Reynah Mosoma, 2019
"I also had to go through the same thing with my daughter. Sho Majozi killed us straight"

**
39. Njabulo Shabalala, 2020
"This child needs to no.that there are people starving and sh e wants sho madjozi do you know that it's expensive and she is angrat full"

**
40. Sip and Talk with Le', 2020
"This was my sisters daughter December πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ and we just gave her full pink hairpiece coz she kept crying πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚"

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor commetns are welcome.

(An Aboriginal Australian anthem about the Stolen Generation) Bob Randall: "Brown Skin Baby (They Took Me Away)"



Global Oneness Project, April 5, 2007

Bob Randall is an Yankunytjatjara Elder and a traditional owner of Uluru (Ayers Rock). In the early 70's Bob's song, "Brown Skin Baby (They Took Me Away)" became an anthem for the Aboriginal people. He is the author of two books: his autobiography Songman and a children's book Tracker Tjginji, and is the subject of the recent documentary film Kanyini. For more, visit globalonenessproject.org.

****
Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases a YouTube video of about Bob Randall's 1970 song "Brown Skin Baby (They Took Me Away)" and lyrics for this song.

This post also presents information about Australia's Stolen Generation, and some comments from the discussion thread of this YouTube video.

The content of this post is presented for historical, socio-cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Bob Randall for his musical and cultural legacy. Rest in Peace.

Respect to all the Stolen Generation children, mothers, fathers and descendants

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT AUSTRALIA'S STOLEN GENERATION
From https://australianstogether.org.au/discover/australian-history/stolen-generations

"The Stolen Generations

The forcible removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families.


Between 1910 and the 1970s*, many First Nations children were forcibly removed from their families as a result of various government policies. The generations of children removed under these policies became known as the Stolen Generations. The policies of child removal left a legacy of trauma and loss that continues to affect Indigenous communities, families and individuals today.

What happened and why?


The forcible removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families was part of the policy of Assimilation, which was based on the misguided assumption that the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people would be improved if they became part of white society. It proposed that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should be allowed to “die out” through a process of natural elimination, or, where possible, assimilated into the white community."...
****
INFORMATION ABOUT BOB RANDALL'S SONG "BROWN SKIN BABY (THEY TOOK ME AWAY".)
From https://www.coloradomusic.org/lyrics-week-bob-randalls-brown-skin-baby-took-away/ [No author is credited for this article and no publishing date is given; retrieved May 7, 2021]

"Bob Randall’s Brown Skin Baby, recorded in 1970, was one of the first songs written about the Stolen Generations. The song explores Randall’s own traumatic past of being “stolen”, echoing the voice of his mother as she cries and grieves for her “brown skin baby”. The song’s reception brought the events of the Stolen Generations to national and international audiences. It is not surprising that it quickly became an anthem for Indigenous communities (Barney & Macklinary, 2010).

The song is autobiographical. It begins by discussing Randall’s early life. As a boy, he spent the first years of his life on a farm in the Northern Territory with his family, riding a pony. Aware that he was at risk of being taken, the women in the family would apply mud to his fair skin everyday to darken the pigment (Randall, 2012). However, when he was seven, a policeman and two trackers arrived on the farm, investigating the murder of livestock. The boy was spotted swimming in the river, revealing his fair skin. The men grabbed him, placed him on a camel and took him to an institution in Alice Springs and gave him the name “Bob Randall”. He was forced to wear clothing and sleep on a bed (that reeked of urine), two activities which were completely foreign to him. Randall remained in the government’s care until he turned 20, after which he was banished for questioning the white authorities.

The song concludes as Randall identifies that he was never able to find his family – “upon this earth they never met again”. This is consistent with most stories. Throughout the assimilation policy, no records were kept of the Aboriginal nation, family name, or identity of the Aboriginal children who were stolen. In contrast to many traumatic stories from the Stolen Generations, Randall spent the rest of his life promoting and preserving Indigenous cultures and histories. He became a Yankunytjatjara Elder and a traditional owner of Uluru.

Randall’s choice of title “Brown Skin Baby” is very important in allowing him to reconcile with his own identity. Indigenous Australians have a history of racial oppression since the European colonization. As noted by Brady and Carey (2000), “for numerous Indigenous Australians, there was a sense of unbelonging”. They were “not white enough to be white” and not “black enough to be black either”. During the twentieth century, these Australians were referred to as “half-castes”. But Randall rejected this term and the repressive dualism. Instead, as suggested by Barney and Macklinary (2010), Randall chose his own term, singing about his own “brown” skin.

# # #

Bob Randall: This next song is a story of our experiences of the Stolen Generation. The system came into my life just 150Ks from here to where the sun rises in the east. The policeman arrived on his camel, saw me there with my family, and because I was who I was, I was stolen. This is a song I composed for that time.

[Singing in native language]

My brown skin baby, they take him away
As a young preacher I used to ride a quiet pony ’round the countryside
In a native camp I’ll never forget, a young black mother, her cheeks all wet.

My brown skin baby, they take him away
Between her sobs I heard her say, Police been taking my baby away,
From white man was that baby I had. Why he let them take baby away?

My brown skin baby, they take him away
To a children’s home a baby came with new clothes on and a new name
Day and night he would always say, Oh mommy, mommy, why they take me away?

The child grew up and had to go from the mission home that he loved so
To find his mother, he tried in vain. Upon this earth they never met again.

My brown skin baby, they take him away".

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THE DISCUSSION THREAD OF THIS YOUTUBE VIDEO
These comments are given in chronological order with the oldest published comments given first, except for replies. Numbers are given for referencing purposes only.

1. BIJOTI, 2007
"Beautiful song, its so sad, makes me want to cry for him."

**
2. Jack Moore, 2008
"very sad song, i imagine if i was taken away from my parents at a young age, or if my kid was taken away from me, it is EXACTLY the same, so sad, and i guess you would just wonder for what reason it was done?"

**
3. Alzo Satour, 2009
"
My GrandMother was taking from her mother into alice springs, from Napperby Community, My Grandmother has now passed away in year 2000 knowing she had lots brothers and sisters, only meeting a couple off them, Nana got married worked at the alice hospital for more then 32 years had 10 kids and 42 grand kids and 18 great grand kids helping raising many off me older cousins when she was alive, Miss You Nana So Much you where the back bone off our proud Tilmouth Family...."

**
4. mmarlyy, 2010
"Our class was so lucky to get a visit from Bob today. Being 13 and 14 years old, you would think that people had matured enough to understand the serious case of this, and the horrible things that happened. But for people to sit there laughing at the movie that was shown, and sitting laughing through his visit...? Disrespectful and unmature.

I sat with tears in my eyes from the stories that were told, and the horrible pictures of the documentary Kanyini.

Beautiful song, with a beautiful meaning."

**
5. Pippa Tassie, 2011
"Lest we ever forget the European colonial arrogance! Maybe we can listen to singers like Bob and learn! Thanks for this video!"

**
6. patacattoday, 2012
"I was taken away, put into a lovely white family, I am lucky in some ways as many where abused in institutions.  I miss my history, my family, they stole my language, my stories, by inheritence.  This makes me sad, Australia doesnt like me, my own people dont like me, where do I go,  The government  you really F%^k up
-snip-
This is the way this comment was written in that discussion thread.

**
7. 
Peter Tseglakof, 2012
"Thank you Bob.  Knowledge is power. Empower us all please."

**
8. adam adrain jeffery, 2012
"what was the name of the movie this song was song in about a young teen girl and her family ?"

 **
Reply
9. Karen Nash, 2019
"The Fringe dwellers"

**
10. 
watu wombat, 2012
"Ouch, this is a song from the heart of an Elder, dont disrepect.... who is reminding his people of what happened in the past so future people remember and dont forget, those of us that this has happened to, it is hard for these fulla's to forget what happened, at least one of Australia's Pri-Ministers had the decency to stand up and say sorry...YOUR A LEGEND JUMUL BOB..."

**
11. Cassandra Mckay, 2012
"my 8 yr old son had to listen to this today at school and said it was so sad it had some students crying by the end of it"

**
12. Yuri muckraker, 2013
"moves me to tears, the continuting displacement,forcibly adopton aboriginals face is horrific. may the apartheid inflicted on aboriginals and all native people end sooner,rather then later,and now not in decades."

**
13. Mitchell Flynn, 2013
"This song makes me aspire to be a better person #Baby #Brown"

**
14. Philip Thorn, 2015
"I heard this man died today I see the boy returning to his mother. A beautiful sad song."

**
Reply
15. Peter McGreevy, 2015
" @Philip Thorn  Just listened to the song for the first time,never met his mother again.   Sad."

**
16. 
Phil Walcott, 2015
"May you rest now and forever in peace, Uncle. Thanks for your wisdom, knowledge, courage, humanity, compassion and love. X"

**
17. Yuri muckraker, 2015
"Rest in Peace Uncle Bob Randall. read this wonderful tribute John Pilger did for Uncle Bob. what a huge loss to the civil rights movement in Australia. For all interested and those who've seen Uncle Bob Randall in John Pilger's films I know he was featured in "The Secret Country: The First Australians fight back" and "Utopia" then this is a must see documentary on this extraordinary man . Australia and also the US,Canada, and New Zealand must dismantle their caste system and decolonize now only then can they truly call themselves a multicultural society or as Pilger said "until we give them back their nationhood we can never claim our own".  https://newmatilda.com/2015/05/15/lets-celebrate-real-australian-heroes-one-weve-just-lost

 btw! all of John Pilger's documentaries on Australia Pilger in Australia, The Secret Country: The First Australians Fight Back, The Last Dreams: Heroes Unsung, Secrets, Other People's Wars, Welcome to Australia, and Utopia you can find at www.johnpilger.com

 if you go to videos, Hard to belive Faith Bandler, Ray Jackson, and now Uncle Bob, warriors in the pursuit of truth, justice, and its a huge blow to the civil rights movement in Australia."

**
18. Johnnralph, 2015
"Tjilpi Bob Randall (c. 1934 – 13 May 2015) was a Yankunytjatjara elder from Australia, member of the Stolen Generations and NAIDOC's 1999 Person of the Year. He is credited with bringing to light the issue of forced removal of Aboriginal children from their families, in 1970. His song, "My Brown Skin Baby They Take Him Away," written at the time, is described as an "anthem" for the Stolen Generations. Randall died in Mutitjulu, Northern Territory, on 13 May 2015,: Source Wikipedia"

**
19. Meymeygwis, 2016
"Dear Uncle Bob, your Spirit lives: you continue to inspire us, to guide us, to raise us to our best...we love you, we bless you, are blessed by you."

**
20. Anythya Nagle, 2017
"My great grandmother was one of those children stolen, due to the forcing "white Australia" movement, i am white, but i hold my koori heritage proudly in my heart."

**
21. Faze Girl, 2017
"
My father used to sing this to me, he's full blood aboriginal he only sang this because I'm mixed race and he wanted me to feel how the stolen children felt, every time he finished the song he always told me how lucky I was that I was born in 2001 and that he didn't have to suffer the pain they suffered, not to mention I actually cried every time."

**
Catherine Mazzeo, 2021
"
Uncle thank you for giving us this song from your heart.  We can hear the cries of the children and their mothers and fathers who searched in vain to find their stolen children each and every day.  They never forgot you either.  Respect to all the Stolen Generation children, mothers, fathers and descendants.  We say sorry for the pain and suffering."

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Thursday, May 6, 2021

Sesame Street: Song -- I Really Love My Hair (2010) And I Love My Hair Remix feat. H.E.R. (2020)



Sesame Street - Oct. 12, 2010

****
VIDEO #2

Sesame Street, July 16, 2020

****
Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases a 2010 animated video of Sesame Street puppets singing "I Love My Hair". The lyrics for that song are also included in this post.

This post also showcases a 2020 video of African American singer H. E. R. performing a remix of "I Love My Hair" on the Not-Too-Late-Show with Elmo.


The content of this post is presented for cultural and entertainment purposes.
All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Joey Mazzarino, the composer of this song and thanks to all those who are associated with these videos.
-snip-
Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2021/05/gracies-corner-i-love-my-hair-animated.html for the closely related pancocojams post entitled "Gracie's Corner - "I Love My Hair" (an animated video of Black children singing about their hair; with lyrics)."

Also, click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/02/sesame-streets-love-my-hair-willow.html for a closely related 2012 pancocojams post entitled "Sesame Street's Love My Hair & Willow Smith's Whip My Hair Videos".

Update: May 7, 2021
One trend in Black girls hairstyles that has occurred since Sesame Street's 2010 "I Really Love My Hair" song is braided hair extensions that include neon colored weaves.  
Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2021/05/trends-in-black-girls-hairstyles-sho.html for the pancocojams post entitled "Trends In Black Girls' Hairstyles: Sho Madjozi Hairstyles (South African Singer/Rapper Sho Madjozi's Influence On Black Girls' Hairstyles)".

****
LYRICS: I REALLY LOVE MY HAIR
(Joey Mazzarino)

Don’t need a trip to the beauty shop,
’cause I love what I got on top.
It’s curly and it’s brown and it’s right up there!
You know what I love? That’s right, my hair!
I really love my hair.
I love my hair. I love my hair.
There’s nothing else that can compare with my hair.
I love my hair, so I must declare:
I really, really, really love my hair.
Wear a clippy or in a bow
Or let it sit in an afro
My hair looks good in a cornrow
It does so many things you know, that’s why I let it grow
I love my hair, I love my hair
I love it and I have to share
I love my hair, I love my hair!
I want to make the world aware I love my hair.
I wear it up. I wear down. I wear it twisted all around.
I wear braids and pigtails too.
I love all the things my hair can do.
In barrettes or flying free, ever perfect tresses you’ll see
My hair is part of me, an awesome part of me
I really love my hair!


[The online source I used for these lyrics in 2012 is no longer available.]  

-snip-
I've read that a number of people think that the vocalist for this song is Willow Smith. However, the actual vocalist is Chantylla "Chauncey" Johnson, a young African American actress who has worked with The Lion King production. https://muppet.fandom.com/wiki/Chantylla_Johnson

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.