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Saturday, March 28, 2020

The Probable Impact Of Covid-19 On The Performance Of Children's Singing Games & Play Party Songs

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part pancocojams series on children's recreational hand clap games, hand slap games, singing games, and play party songs.

Part II of this series showcases some YouTube videos of children's circle singing games in which children hold hands and/or touch each other. Part II also provides a definition of the term "play parties" and showcases some videos of children performing play party songs. All of those videos were taped before the Covid 19 pandemic.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2020/03/the-probable-impact-of-covid-19-on_17.html for Part I of this pancocojams series. Part I showcases five YouTube videos of children's hand clap games. Part I also provides an explanation of the differences between hand clap games & hand slap games and showcases two videos of hand slap games. All of those videos were taped before the Covid 19 pandemic.

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
During the Covid 19 pandemic people throughout the world recognize the influence Covid 19 has had on the ways people greet and say goodbye to each other (i.e. no more handshakes, hugs, and kisses). This post suggests that people should also consider the ways that Covid-19 impacts (or should impact) children's recreational activities.

These videos serve as examples of how those recreational activities conflict with the guidelines during Covid-19 of not touching other people's hands or other parts of another person's body. Those recreational activities also conflict with Covid -19 prevention guidelines of maintaining at least six feet of social distance between people to help prevent against getting Covid-19.

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The content of this post is presented for educational, disease prevention, and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all who are featured in these videos. Thanks also to all those who published these examples on YouTube.

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INFORMATION ABOUT PLAY PARTY SONGS
From https://www.okhistory.org/publications/enc/entry.php?entry=PL001
"The play-party developed out of the American frontier experience and continued in rural environs well into the twentieth century. A play-party is a social gathering in which young people "play" a game involving drama and swinging movements performed to singing and hand clapping, without instrumental accompaniment. The play-party evolved from children's games and grew up in an era when musical instruments were considered inappropriate for proper social occasions. Many churches in early American communities shunned the fiddle, which was often described as "the Devil's box." In the middle South and in the southern highlands, oral tradition preserved play-parties, and as pioneers migrated westward, they carried these traditions with them.

The play-party typically used a song like "Skip to My Lou" or "London Bridge" as a game, combined with music. Participants and sometimes bystanders sang the songs. Play-parties took the place of dance parties for children and adolescents where all other dancing was forbidden. Also popular in less restrictive communities, the play-parties continued into the 1930s as entertainment for young adults who could not afford to go to a public dance. As public schools developed, play-parties thrived on the playground. In the twentieth century playgrounds likely preserved many of the songs. Play-parties, common in most Oklahoma communities, only began to lose popularity in the 1950s."...

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Notice that many of these videos were taped while children were in their school's music class.

Example #1: Pizza Pizza Daddy-O



folkstreamer, Aug 3, 2006

A 1967 film by Bob Eberlein and Bess Lomax Hawes that looks at continuity and change in girls' playground games at a Los Angeles school

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Example #2: Alabama Gal



Laurie Rocconi, Mar 27, 2009

school dance

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Example #3: G3 Great Big House in New Orleans



ESMusicISB, Sep 19, 2012

Watch as Ms. H's class sing and dance to the American folk song "Great Big House in New Orleans."

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Example #4: Bluebird Through My Window Demo



Deborah K Oakes, Apr 24, 2013

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Example #5: Ring-Around-the-Rosie Song



AFHero66, Mar 20, 2017

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Example #6: Fun singing games - John Kanaka, Round de doo bop and more...



Singing Games, Dec 8, 2018

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Example #7: Zudio



Mr.Wilson's Music Class, Apr 4, 2019

4-2-2019, Ms. Maguire’s 3rd Graders perform the Georgian Island’s Party Play Song: Zudio
-snip-
"Here We Go Zudio" is very similar to the singing games "Strut Miss Lucy" and "Here We Go Valarie".

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This concludes Part II of this two part pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

The Probable Impact Of Covid-19 On The Performance Of Children's Hand Clap Games And Hand Slap Games


Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a two part pancocojams series on children's recreational hand clap games, hand slap games, singing games, and play party songs.

Part I showcases some YouTube videos of children's hand clap games and hand slap games. All of those videos were taped before the Covid 19 pandemic. Part I also provides an explanation of the differences between hand clap games & hand slap games and showcases two videos of hand slap games.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2020/03/the-probable-impact-of-covid-19-on_28.html for Part II of this series. Part II showcases some YouTube videos of children's circle singing games in which children hold hands and/or touch each other. Part II also showcases some videos of children performing play party songs. All of those videos were taped before the Covid 19 pandemic.

****
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
During the Covid 19 pandemic people throughout the world recognize the influence Covid 19 has had on the ways people greet and say goodbye to each other (i.e. no more handshakes, hugs, and kisses). This post suggests that people should also consider the ways that Covid-19 impacts (or should impact) children's recreational activities.

These videos serve as examples of how those recreational activities conflict with the guidelines during Covid-19 of not touching other people's hands or other parts of another person's body. Those recreational activities also conflict with Covid -19 prevention guidelines of maintaining at least six feet of social distance between people to help prevent against getting Covid-19.

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The content of this post is presented for educational, disease prevention, and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all who are featured in these videos. Thanks also to all those who published these examples on YouTube.

****
PART I- Hand Clap Rhymes and Hand Slap Rhymes
Definitions:
Hand clap games are those recreational activities in which two, three, or four people stand in place or sit in place and chant a rhyme while clapping each others' hands. These games are usually mildly competitive.

Hand slap games are those mildly competitive recreational or stress reduction activities a group of people stand or sit in place and chant a rhyme while passing along a light slap on the hand of the person to their right. At the end of each iteration of that rhyme, the person whose hand is slapped is out and the chant starts from the beginning. When there are only two people left, the two clap each other's hands or engage in some other exercise until there is only one person left. That person is the winner. Two relatively well known examples of hand slap games in the United States are "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky" and "Stella Ella Ola".

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Notice that some of these videos are of children in their school's music class.

Example #1: Sesame Street: Handclapping Chants



Sesame Street, Mar 27, 2009

If you're watching videos with your preschooler and would like to do so in a safe, child-friendly environment, please join us at http://www.sesamestreet.org

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Example #2: Studying tempo with "Miss Mary Mack" in 3rd Grade!



Casey Hall, Jan 17, 2014

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Example #3: Down by the banks



Philip Fiorio, Feb 24, 2015

Gva second grade hand clapping game

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Example #4: Rockin' Robin Hand Game 2017!



Costa Rica Rich, Jan 6, 2017

Today we decided to try the rocking robin hand game! We started to get the hang of it and had lots of fun!
-snip-
This hand clap portion of this video begins at 017. I believe that it's very rare for people to clap hands to the "Rockin Robin" record. Usually, children (and/or teens and adults) chant a rhyme while doing this four person hand clap routine.

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Example #5: Stella Ella Olla Action Song Demo



Themes & Variations, Aug 9, 2017

Singing Games Children Love Vol. 4 has 40 singing games that children love to sing and play. Volume 4 includes games and activities for students in Grades 3-6. A variety of singing games and activities are included: traditional singing games from North America and from around the world, original singing games for special days, movement canons, and active rhythm games. The games are organized by melodic concept, making this a useful collection for the teacher looking for activities to reinforce student's music reading abilities
-snip-
"Stella Ella Ola" is also known as "Quack Diddley Oso", "Slap Billyola" and other names.

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Example #6: ABC HIT IT hand clapping game step by step



Just Grace, May 15, 2019

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Example #7: Hand Clap Games



EL. J. Awa, Jun 24, 2019

Welcome back BFF's! Today I want to show you some of my favorite clap hand games! My brother will help me :) Come on, let's play!

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This concludes Part I of this two part pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Article Excerpt About A South African Song About Malaria For Pre-School Children

Edited by Azizi Powqell

This pancocojams post presents an article excerpt published in 2018 about a health based project to compose and teach a song about Malaria to pre-school South African children.

The content of this post is presented for health educational and cultural purposes.

This information may be helpful to projects throughout the world that may be gearing up to compose and teach songs about Covid-19 to young children.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who were involved in this project.

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ARTICLE EXCERPT
From https://malariajournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12936-018-2320-7
Research Open Access
Published: 27 April 2018
"Using participatory risk analysis to develop a song about malaria for young children in Limpopo Province, South Africa"

Chad M. Anderson, Cheryl M. E. McCrindle, Taneshka Kruger & Fraser McNeill

"Abstract
Background
In 2015, malaria infected over 212 million people and killed over 429,000 individuals, mostly children under 5 years of age, with 90% of malaria cases occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim was to develop an age and culturally appropriate song for Tshivenda-speaking children under 5 years of age to decrease the risk of malaria in Limpopo Province, South Africa.

[...]

Background
Malaria killed 429,000 people in 2015, with 90% of malaria cases occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. A large proportion of deaths from malaria occur in children less than 5 years of age as they have not yet acquired immunity [1]. In South Africa there is a risk of malaria in the north eastern parts of Limpopo, Mpumalanga Kwazulu-Natal Provinces [2]. Epidemiological factors are called disease determinants and the interaction between the agent, host and environment plays a role in the likelihood of disease occurring [3]. This interaction is often called the “epidemiological triad”

[...]

A risk based approach is considered appropriate for prevention and management of vector borne diseases [10]. The risk of contracting malaria in South Africa can be significantly reduced by preventing mosquito bites, even in low risk areas [2, 7]. Participatory risk analysis can be used to reduce the risk of disease using three phases: magnitude and frequency of disease exposure can be estimated using risk assessment, mitigation strategies can be developed and the risk reduced by appropriate risk communication

[...]

Early childhood programmes aim at instilling life-long learning in children using conceptual and cognitive learning strategies [13]. According to Piaget’s theory of early childhood development, during the pre-operational phase (2–7 years of age), young children begin to use language, memory and imagination [14]. In both European and African culture, this is the time when grandmothers use traditional nursery rhymes and songs to convey information to young children [15]. In South Africa, children are carried on their mother’s backs until about 2 years of age, then they are able to run about and it is at that stage that caregivers (like mothers, older sisters, aunts or pre-school teachers) start to teach them life skills. Young children like these, who are at risk of malaria, are pre-literate, but communication can be facilitated through the medium of songs and dance to enhance learning [13, 16]. Music and song are used in advertising to significantly increase recall and comprehension of a product with songs or “jingles” specifically targeted at the audience likely to purchase that product [17]. Musical interventions have previously been used to prevent or manage disease through promoting behaviour change in adolescents and adults, but no examples were found for young children [18, 19]. Examples in Africa include HIV/AIDS peer group education amongst young women, songs on preventing Ebola, as well as a song for stamping out malaria [20,21,22]. It appears, that there is a gap in published knowledge about children less than five being a target audience for risk communication strategies and this may be a new way to improve public health interventions aimed at reducing malaria. The aim of this study was to identify disease determinants appropriate to reducing the risk of malaria in young Tshivenda speaking children in Limpopo and use these as lyrics in an age and culture appropriate song.

[...]


Procedure
The study was based mainly on qualitative methods, applicable to participatory action research and risk analysis [11, 12]. Literature was reviewed using a document search to identify determinants of malaria in children less than 5 years of age, that could be used to reduce the risk of malaria in the study area. These determinants were used to develop the lyrics for an age and culturally appropriate song in the Tshivenda language. The music was conceptualized during a participatory workshop with four Venda musicians and a Venda cultural expert (who is also a recording musician) in the Department of Anthropology and Archaeology at the University of Pretoria, South Africa.

[...]

The lyrics were initially written in English for evaluation by the experts, then translated into Tshivenda for evaluation and discussion with two focus groups in the study area.

Focus groups are considered very useful for obtaining subjective opinions from key stakeholders [25]. The first focus group (n = 7) were all female caregivers and included Tshivenda speaking village mothers, grandmothers and pre-school teachers in the study area. The second focus group (n = 5), was comprised of malaria management and spray-control personnel, working for the Limpopo Province malaria control programme (MCP). These were all Tshivenda speaking men, with knowledge about malaria prevention at community level in the study area. Music and lyrics were changed in line with feedback from both focus groups as well as the expert opinion surveys.

[...]

Results

[...]

Following this, it was decided to add verses about bed nets and symptoms to the song lyrics. The musician asked the advice of the village women in the first focus group, on how best to include these ideas in the lyrics. The women suggested Tshivenda words that small children would understand easily and that made sense. They also sang them, to show the musician how to incorporate them in the rhythm and beat of the traditional music. This was truly a participatory research approach, as women in the study area are adept at improvising songs about village life and the young musician grew up in the same area.

The first focus group agreed unanimously with the words of the song, after he had changed them. All participants agreed that the words were no longer ‘complex’ or ‘deep’ Tshivenda terms; and they liked the repetition of the first and last lyric. It was felt that even if the children might not learn all of the lyrics initially, they would understand and sing along with those being repeated throughout the song. When asked if the song was age and culture appropriate, two members of the first focus group commented:

Caregiver 1 (a mother) said, “Yes! It is! And I think that all children will be able to learn it fast.”

Pre-school teacher 1 said, “Well Yes. The repetition is important I think.” “This is going to make children learn faster like she said, and I like how it connects mosquitoes to malaria.”

During the song improvisation, those from the first focus group also suggested adding motions and actions to the lyrics. They thought children would learn better, if actions were attached to some of the words. Caregiver 4, who was a pre-school teacher, even suggested:

“Umm…what if this were paired with a game?”

The possibility of a game about malaria, attached to the song, had also been brought up by one of the experts from the early childhood education sector consulted during the opinion surveys.
[…]

On returning from Thohoyandou, the group of musicians and the Venda cultural expert, convened in a recording studio in downtown Pretoria and reworked the changes to the lyrical content. The Zwidade rhythm was programmed into a computer, using recording software, and an appropriate tempo was set accordingly. The repetitive structure at the start and end of each verse was kept, but it was decided that for maximum impact and potential participation for children who might not remember all the lyrics, the final line of each verse (ndi na malaria!—I have malaria!) should include a multitude of voices, giving the aural impression of a sing-along, with loud hand-clapping. The final song is included as a sound byte (Additional file 1). In the Tshivenda language, a singular mosquito is lunyunyu. In the plural, this becomes vhunyunyu

The final lyrics of the malaria song were:

(The English version was translated verbatim from Tshivenda)

Verse 1

Nne ndi lunyunyu,:
I am a mosquito

Nne ndi a luma,:
I bite

Athi funi vhathu,:
I don’t like people

Ndi na Malaria! :
I have malaria!

Verse 2

Nne ndi lunyunyu, :
I am a mosquito

Ndi da na malwadze, :
I come with diseases

Thoho iya rema, :
I gave you a headache

Ndi na Malaria!:
I have malaria!

Verse 3

Nne ndi lunyunyu, :
I am a mosquito

Ndi da na malwadze :
I come with diseases

Dzungu na mufhiso :
Dizziness and fever

Ndi na Malaria! :
I have malaria!

Verse 4

Nne ndi lunyunyu, :
I am a mosquito

Madini o imaho, :
I live in still water

A tevhuleni kule :
throw it far away

Ndi na Malaria! :
I have malaria!

Verse 5

Nne ndi lunyunyu,:
I am a mosquito

Duvha li tshi kovhela :
at sunset

Fukani muvhili :
cover your body

Ndi na Malaria! :
I have malaria!

Verse 6

Nne ndi lunyunyu,:
I am a mosquito

Shumisani nethe, :
use a net

Nne ndi si dzhene :
so that I can’t get in

Ndi na Malaria! :
I have malaria!

Verse 7 (×4)

Ri vhana vha Afrika :
We are the children of Africa

Ro guda luimbo :
we learned this song

Ro pandela vhunyunyu :
we chased away the mosquitos

Ha Malaria! :
Mosquitos with malaria!

All the above were then repeated.

[...]

The population at risk in the current study was children under the age of 5 years. In the study area, risk communication to this population was mediated through adult caregivers. However, this study proposes that young children can also be empowered to protect themselves, using knowledge gained through a song. Similar to life skills gained through nursery rhymes, the song encourages early learning about the dangers of being bitten by mosquitoes, the use of bed nets and fans and the signs of malaria. It is also recommended, in line with UNICEF suggestions for communicating with young children [33], that the song be accompanied by movements and dancing; or a game where one child dressed as a mosquito chases others, who, if caught, lie down and pretend to be sick. Both of these additions were suggested by preschool teachers during the focus group discussions with care-givers. Early childhood education is based on the theory that life skills learned by children under 7 years of age remain and are passed on in turn to their own children when they are adults. This song could be a partial solution to the lack of knowledge about malaria in rural communities highlighted in several publications. It is recommended that participatory risk analysis methods described in this study, could also be used to develop songs with specific messages about malaria prevention, appropriate to language, culture and age of young children in other areas where malaria is endemic.

Conclusions
It is concluded that a culturally and age appropriate song to help children under the age of 5 years old has been created and accepted by selected representatives of the Tshivenda-speaking community and malaria experts in the study area. All of the determinants were agreed upon and that the use of these determinants could bring behavioural changes to the young children. The complete song is now ready to be made into a video. Further studies to measure the effectiveness of the song are recommended.”...
-snip-
Unfortunately, I haven't found this song on YouTube. If you know it, please share any information about this song and about a video of this song. Thanks!

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Pamela Pupkin's Covid 19 Quarantine Video & Song

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases Laura Clery's funny and clever Covid-19 quarantine workshop video and song/chant.

This post also includes my unofficial transcription of this video (using that video's close captions).

The content of this post is presented for educational and entertainment purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Laura Clery and her husband for producing and starring in this video and for composing this "Quarantine workshop" song.

Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post.

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE.
This video is an exception to pancocojams' rule of showcases music/dance videos or focusing on other cultural content from African American cultures and other Black cultures around the world.

One of my daughter's Facebook friends sent her this video and she shared it with me. The lyrical structure of this workout song reminds me of children's songs and chants, except that there's no rhyming verses. However, the simple (uncomplicated), repetitive phrasing with their easy to do accompanying motions help to make this song/chant easy to remember*. The comic antics of the workshop instructor and the man who accompanies her add to this video's humor.

*I was going to write "catchy", but in light of the Covid-19 subject, that word is probably not the greatest description of that song/chant.

Aside from the cleavage that the woman shows in her exercise outfit and the one instance near the beginning of this video when she says the word "ass", I believe this video could be very suitable to be shown to children and could be a good way to reinforce Covid-19 safety rules (albeit with some modifications such as not throwing the water in the air while you're washing your hands.)

Full disclosure admission- My daughter and I showed this video several times to her six year old daughter (my grandchild) and she loves it, although we have to warn her that she can't really do karate kicks if someone wants to give her a hug.
Update (March 28, 2020- It occurred to me that "Pamela Pupkin's Covid-19 Quarantine Workout Song"* reminds me of a cheerleader cheer mixed with line dance instructions and/or Hip Hop scratches.
No wonder I kept referring to it as a song/chant.

*I think that "Pamela Pupkin's Covid-19 Quarantine Workout Song" is a good title for this song since there will be other Covid-19 quarantine songs and also probably be copycat Covid-19 videos/songs as I predict that this video/song will soon go viral.

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SHOWCASE VIDEO: Quarantine Workout !!!!



LAURA CLERY, Mar 26, 2020
-snip-
Statistics as of March 28, 2020 at 7:09 AM EDT
total views 133,231
total likes- 4.8k
total dislikes-83
total comments-315

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VIDEO TRANSCRIPTION*
[This is somewhat of a parody of 1980s workout videos. The workshop instructor "Pamela Pupkin" is a young/middle age White woman who wears a psychedelic green leotard with bright pink tights and a pink hand band in her blond hair. The leotard shows her cleavage to give her a somewhat sexy image. Pamela does all the talking in this video. She speaks with at least a hint of a Southern accent. "Steven", a young/middle age White man wearing a white sleeveless t-shirt and baggy red shorts with black trim is also featured in this video. He is usually shown standing or doing exercises behind "Pamela", although it's probably not the recommended 6 feet apart. At the end of the video, "Pamela" calls him "Roger" which I assume is his real name. (From reading the comments, I learned that "Pamela" (Laura Clery) and "Steven" (Roger) are married and have other videos (with these characters and as themselves) on their YouTube channel and on other social media sites.

My description of the accompanying movements are given in italics within brackets]

Hi y’all. I’m Pamela Pupkin

And you’re about to do
Pamela Pupkin’s quarantine workout.

Wash your hands. [Pamela is shown at a bathroom sink washing her hands with soap and water as she slowly counts to 20.]

2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20

Wooo!

That’s great, y’all!

Let’s dry these suckers off. [Pamela dries her hands with a cloth towel]

Hey, Covid-19! [Pamela holds a spray bottle of sanitizer and speaks close up to the camera.]
You don’t scare us.
I got 19 ways to destroy your ass.

Work those thighs. [Pamela does exercise motions while holding a spray bottle]
Sanitize.

Work those thighs.
Sanitize.

Work those thighs.
Sanitize.

Work those thighs.
Sanitize
San-i-tize.

We’re spraying. [Pamela sprays the and then does the prayer/Namaste gesture]
And we’re praying.

We’re spraying.
And we’re praying.
We’re spraying.
And we’re praying.

Double time.
Spray.
Pray.

Spray.
Pray.

Spray
Pray.

And stay inside. [In this portion of the video, Pamela and Steven move side to side]
Move side to side.
Stay inside.
Move side to side.
Stay inside.
Move side to side.

Stay

in

side

Don’t touch your eyes. [Pamela mimics pointing to these parts of her face]
Don’t touch that nose.
Don’t touch that mouth.

Don’t touch your eyes.
Don’t touch that nose.
Don’t touch that mouth.

Wash your hands Pamela is shown in a bathroom again washing her hands and drying them off]
2, 3, 4, 5, 5,6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20.

Wooo!

That’s great y’all!

Let’s dry those suckers off.

And sneeze like this. [Pamela and Steven do the dab dance as a recommended way of sneezing and coughing]
Cough like that!
Sneeze like this.
Cough like that.
Sneeze like this.
Cough like that.

Sneeze like this.
Cough like that.
And cough like that.

C’mon! Soap! [Pamela again is shown washing her hands. This time she also plays with the water, throwing some water in the air]
Water!
Soap!
Soap and water!
Soap, soap.
Water, water.
Soap and water.
Soap
water.
Soap and water.
Soap soap
water water
Soap and water.

We’re going to practice social distancing.
See that human person.
We’re staying 6 feet away. [Pamela and Steven put one hand near the side of their face, as if to hide their face and move from one side to another while they say these words]
See that human person.
And we’re staying 6 feet away.

Human person.
Six feet away.

Human person.
Six feet away.

Human person.
Six feet away.

Human person.
Six feet away.

Human person.
Six feet away.

Six feet away.
Six feet away.

Now what do you do
If someone comes up and tries to give you a handshake?
Or a hug?
Block Em. During this portion, "Pamela" does karate blocks and kicks while "Steven" does karate blocks.
Block Em.
Block Em.
Block Em.
Block block Em.
Block Em.
Block Em.
Block Em.
Bl Bl. Block Em.
Block Em.
Block Em.
Block Em.
Block Em.
Block Em.
Bl Bl. Block Em.
Block Em.
Block Em.
Block Em.
Bl Bl. Block Em.
Block Em. Block Em. Block Em.
Block Block Block Em.
Bl Bl Block Em.
Block Em.
Block Em.
Bl Bl Bloc Em.

[This segment ends with “Pamela” and “Steven” laughing hilariously]

[”Pamela” speaking in a soft, gentle voice]Hi, y’all. Pamela Pupkin here again.

And I hope that y’all enjoyed my quarantine workout.

Now, please, I beg of you, share this video
to your friends and family.

Just because we’re stuck inside doesn’t mean we can’t have fun
and stay fit.
And y’all, please go and check on your elderly neighbors.
See if they need your help.
It’s more important now than ever, to be kind.

You must be kind…[Pamela’s voice changes to a harsh tone
Okay, your butt is in my shot, Roger!”
-snip-
*This is my unofficial transcription of this video. Additions and corrections are welcome.

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DESCRIPTION OF THE DAB DANCE THAT IS DONE IN THE COUGHING/SNEEZING PORTION OF THIS SONG/CHANT
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dab_(dance)
"Dabbing, or the dab is a simple dance move or gesture in which a person drops his or her head into the bent crook of a slanted, upwardly angled arm, while raising the opposite arm out straight in a parallel direction. Since 2015, dabbing has been used as a gesture of triumph or playfulness, becoming a youthful American fad and Internet meme.[1] The move looks similar to someone sneezing into the "inside" of their elbow.[1][2]"....
-snip-
A photograph of the dab gesture is found on that Wikipedia page.

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