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Tuesday, June 22, 2021

Comments About Some West African First Names & Some West African Contemporary Naming Practices (From Two 2020 Lipstick Alley Discussions Thread)

 Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents selected comments (posts) from two Lipstick Alley African Forum's discussion threads about names.

Both of those discussion threads focus on last names but include a few comments about first names.

The content of this post is presented for onamastic, cultural, and educational purposes. 

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who participated in this discussion.
-snip-

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2021/06/mande-last-name-meaning-and-history.html for a pancocojams post entitled ""Mandé Last Name, Meaning and History" (Comments About Certain West African Last Names From A 2020 Lipstick Alley Discussion Thread)".

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EXCERPT OF THE LIPSTICK ALLEY DISCUSSION THREAD ENTITLED "THE MOST COMMON LAST NAME IN EVERY AFRICAN COUNTRY" 

https://www.lipstickalley.com/threads/the-most-common-last-name-in-every-african-country.3928937/page-3   "The Most Common Last Name in Every African Country".

the waterworks, Sept. 19, 2020
#68
"
Most Hausa names double as last names because of the historical system of taking your father's first name as a last name.

So in Northern Nigeria you'll see people with Ibrahim, Mohammed, Abubakar, Abdullahi, Usman as last names and they trace it back to a great-great grandfather's first name. Arabs do this too except they'd say "bin or ibn (son of) Mohammed" for example."

**

AwonOshi, Sept. 19, 2020
#69
"PoeticPisces said: [Pancococjams Editor: This comment is regarding the name "Ibrahim which the map featured in the first comment of this discussion indicated was the most common last name in Nigeria]
I get that as a first name but not a last name. I don't know anyone with that as their last name

Yes true, my family members with that name all have it as first or middle names. I believe Hausas mainly have it as last names. I know a Hausa IG influencer (Aisha Ibrahim) who has the last name.

This site says Ibrahim is the 63rd most common surname in the world with it being most prevalent in Nigeria. Ibrahim Surname Origin, Meaning & Last Name History

Kinda of crazy since Nigeria is not a predominantly Muslim country like say Senegal or Somalia. Just goes to show how huge our population is.

**
AwonOshi, Sept. 19, 2020
#70
thewaterworks said:
Most Hausa names double as last names because of the historical system of taking your father's first name as a last name."


I was going to say this, they also do this in yorubaland regardless of religion.
-snip-
[Pancocojams Editor: That portion of the comment was written in bold font to emphasize it.]

**
thewaterworks,Sept. 19, 2020

#71
AwonOshi said:
"
Yes true, my family members with that name all have it as first or middle names. I believe Hausas mainly have it as last names. I know a Hausa IG influencer (Aisha Ibrahim) who has the last name.

This site says Ibrahim is the 63rd most common surname in the worldxactly! It's also pretty popular in Sudan, where the billionaire Mo Ibrahim comes from...

Exactly! It's also pretty popular in Sudan, where the billionaire Mo Ibrahim comes from."

**
https://www.lipstickalley.com/threads/the-most-common-last-name-in-every-african-country.3928937/page-4

Larue1, Sept, 19, 2020
#97
"Just as an aside for those interested in Ethiopian names. We don't have "family names" the way you do in the West. I have a name, the second name I use is my father's name and the final name I use is my grandfather's name. This lets you know who I am.

For example using Western names: Alice John William. I am Alice. My father is John and my grandfather is William, When you speak to me you call me Mrs. Alice, not Mrs. William. William is my GRANDFATHER, and his name is not my own. His name and my father's name are present so you know from whom I descend: John, son of William.

If I were a boy my name may be David John William and when I have my own son his name would be Peter David John. He would be addressed as Mr. Peter and you would know he is the son of David who is the son of John. Williams name falls into the ages.

Because I am a woman I always belong to my father and my name does not change after marriage. In a Habesha household the mother will have her own "last name" (grandfather's name) a father will have his own "last name" (grandfather's name) and the children will all share the name of their father's father, their grandfather, as a "last name".

Also Tesfaye means "hope".
-snip-
Pancocojams Editor: "Tesfaye" was given in the "African name map" attached to the first comment in this discussion thread as "the most common last name in Ethiopia".

**
https://www.lipstickalley.com/threads/the-most-common-last-name-in-every-african-country.3928937/page-5

Xoriyo, Sept. 19, 2020
#133
"Larue1 said:

Just as an aside for those interested in Ethiopian names. We don't have "family names" the way you do in the West. I have a name, the second name I use is my father's name and the final name I use is my grandfather's name. This lets you know who I am."...

We have the exact same naming system in Somalia.

The grandfather's name is normally the cut off point for official use. However, as children, we are expected to memorise the names of our great grandfathers dating back generations.

This ties in with the clan system as eventually, you will find common ancestors with other Somalis if you go back far enough.

We also keep our 'last names' when we get married as we are still part of our father's family.

I think this is a great way of keeping track of your lineage and family history"

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EXCERPT OF THE LIPSTICK ALLEY DISCUSSION THREAD ENTITLED  “AFRICAN LAST NAME" SPIN OFF- MANDE LAST NAME, MEANING AND HISTORY

https://www.lipstickalley.com/threads/%E2%80%9Cafrican-last-name%E2%80%9D-spin-off-mand%C3%A9-last-name-meaning-and-history.3945451/page-5

Farashalady, Dec 5, 2020
#146
"Random.. but I noticed a lot of first names in west Africa end in ata.

 ex.) Miatta, Katta, Aminatta etc. anybody know where the ata comes from, it’s meaning?"

**
bebelala, Dec 5, 2020

#147
"I know Aminata is from Amina. Names like Aissata, Aichatou, Fatoumata are really africanized Arabic names."

**
bebelala, Dec 5, 2020
#149
"Farashalady said:
So it comes from Islamic influence? I was wondering if the ata part was African or Islamic. I know Amina, Fatima etc are Islamic. But what about the ata part?

Honestly I don't know. I am assuming that's how africans at the time pronounce Arabic names. Even Mahamadou/Mamadou is supposed to be Mohamed, Soumaila is Ismaeil, Youssoufou is Yusef, Daouda is Dawhud

Also, Bintou comes from Bint, Oumou is from Umm

In Mali, in Bambara culture, before converting to Islam, names were often given based on the order or day you are born. For example, the first son will be named N'Tji, second son, Zan, third son, N'golo."

**
Lady2023, Dec 6, 2020
#150
"SnakeWithHands said:
In Mali, in Bambara culture, before converting to Islam, names were often given based on the order or day you are born. For example, the first son will be named N'Tji, second son, Zan, third son, N'golo.

Now I know where N’golo Kante’s name comes from. I like it when Africans stick to our cultural names instead of Arabic and European names."

**
https://www.lipstickalley.com/threads/%E2%80%9Cafrican-last-name%E2%80%9D-spin-off-mand%C3%A9-last-name-meaning-and-history.3945451/page-6

Farashalady “Dec 6, 2020
#154
"SnakeWithHands said:
Our parent's generation and above them were given those Arabic ish names to show their muslim identity but the name giving tradition changed. We are now giving names after elders (parents, grandfathers, older siblings, etc) so it's almost like those names are even more widespread than before.

Some traditional names are still around tho. Names like Djeneba, Korotoumou, Coumba, Djelika, Sadio, Modibo, Gaoussou, Touramanka, Toumani are quite common.

Interesting. Modibo, Kumba, and jeneba are common in Sierra Leone as wellll"

**
Lady2023, Dec 6, 2020
#155
"Yes, the Arabic names get recycled but as you said the cultural names are still quite common. However, Djeneba is the African version of Zainab an Arabic name. Anyway, you have Sadio Mane who is Mandinka from Senegal, Toumani Diabate and his son Sidiki Diabate from Mali, and Modibo Keita, the first president of Mali. That’s just to name a few public figures with Mande names."

**
Bebelala, Dec 6, 2020
#156
"Really, I thought Zeneibou = Zainab

Djene= spirits, the supernatural

Ba = big, great or mother"

In Mali, Sadio is mainly female name. There is a griot called Sadio Kouyate."

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Lady2023, Dec 6, 2020
#157
"Oh ok. I might have gotten it mixed up with Gambia where “Jainaba” is from Zainab. I thought “Djeneba” was the French spelling. Never mind lol..

Btw, Sadio is unisex in Gambia but we spell in “Sarjo”."

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Bebelala, Dec 6, 2020
#158
"Yes Djeneba is the French spelling. It could really well be an arabic ish name.

 There are some confusion when it comes to the origins of some names. For example, Fatou is very widespread. Some say it's from Fatima, but there are historians that claims that the name has even around even before the Islamization."

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cubum, Dec 6, 2020
#159
"What’s really interesting is how the same thing also is occurring with a lot of african chrisians in west africa. My mom and my dad both had biblical names but they gave me and my siblings igbo names and I saw that to be common in our church as well with children given names in remembrance of elders."

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bebelala Dec 6, 2020
#160
"Are your parents and elders so eager to have a child name after them ? In Mali, it's almost obligatory now to give your kids the names of your parents. Elders want to have a "togoman" (someone with the same name or and named after them) so bad."

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cubum, Dec 6, 2020
#161
"It’s very rare in igbo culture today to find people with the exact names of their parents.

Igbo folks tend to be highly individualized in the naming of each kid, and using that name to explain the circumstances behind the birth of that kid whether the mom or family having trouble or good fortune during the pregnancy, birth, or after birth, an elder rumoured to have been reincarnated in the baby and other circumstances I can’t think of atm lol.

So those circumstances usually don’t allow a kid to take the same name as their mom or dad."

**
wanderluste, Dec 7, 2020
#162
"In Sierra Leone, Zainab/Zainabu= Jeneba/Jenebu."

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"Mandé Last Name, Meaning and History" (Comments About Certain West African Last Names From A 2020 Lipstick Alley Discussion Thread)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents selected comments (posts) from a Lipstick Alley African Forum's discussion thread about Mandé last names in Mali, West Africa and in some other West African nations. That Lipstick Alley discussion thread has a total of seven pages (as of June 21, 2021 at 10:23 PM).* 

There are other comments in that discussion about African last names from non-Mande groups. In addition, that discussion includes comments about African first names**. There are also comments in that discussion about, intermarriage of Muslim and non-Muslim people in West Africa, contemporary West African attitudes about griots, and about other several other topics.

The content of this post is presented for onamastic, cultural, and educational purposes. 


All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to bebelala, this discussion's thread starter, and thanks to all those who participated in this discussion.
-snip-
I encourage all those interested in African names and naming practices to read this entire discussion.

*bebelala, that thread starter wrote "I am google translating these post from French so please excuse the bad grammar."

Based on some comments in that discussion, bebelala's former screen name is "SnakeWithHands".

Lady2023, a frequent commenter in that discussion thread is from Gambia, West Africa. Killian_Ivory, another frequent commenter in that discussion thread is from the Ivory Coast. 

The comments in this discussion thread usually end with the word "Thanks" or with the words "Thanks. Hugs". Because of space consideration,  I didn't include those endings. 

**
Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2021/06/comments-about-some-west-african-first.html for a short pancocojams post that excerpts several comments about African first names from this same Lipstick Alley discussion. 

This Lipstick Alley discussion thread is a spin off of a nine page discussion thread that started in September 19, 2020 that is entited https://www.lipstickalley.com/threads/the-most-common-last-name-in-every-african-country.3928937/  "The Most Common Last Name in Every African Country".

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EXCERPT OF DISCUSSION THREAD : “AFRICAN LAST NAME" SPIN OFF- MANDE LAST NAME, MEANING AND HISTORY

https://www.lipstickalley.com/threads/%E2%80%9Cafrican-last-name%E2%80%9D-spin-off-mand%C3%A9-last-name-meaning-and-history.3945451/

bebelala, Sep 24, 2020
#1
"This is an informative and discussion thread about last name in Mandé society that spread from Gambia, Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Sierra Leone, Cote D’Ivoire, Guinea, and beyond

 As for myself, I am Bambara from Mali, so I’ll focus on names and history that’s more familiar to me but feel free to add more info from your country, ethnic group or knowledge

First, let’s start with some important facts on Mandé culture and people

As many already know, the Mandé founded 3 major empires in West Africa : Ghana Empire, Mali Empire, and the Songhai Empire.

Mandé people are primary Muslims and played a significant role in the history of the religion in the region. Islam came from the Soninké Nobles/Kings during the Ghana Empire. The Bambara people didn’t convert until the jihad against in French in the 19th century. There are some Christian/Catholic Mandé in the region and some who follow pre-Islamic belief, but I think it depends from groups to groups and from regions as well.

So, what’s the difference between Mandé, Mandingue/Mandingo/ Mandinka/Malinke, Bambara, Soninke, Jula/Dyula ?

Mandé is the umbrella term that groups all the branches of Mandé groups which includes but not limited to the Mandinka/Malinké, Soninké, Bambara, Susu, Jula/Dyula, Kassonké, Mende and so on.

Mandinka/Malinke/Mandingo are the significant group of Mandé and are dominant in Mali, North Cote D’Ivoire, Guinea, with some significant numbers in Senegal and Gambia.

The most significant Mandinka ever existed is probably Soundjata Keita, the founder of the Empire of Mali and the grand uncle of Mansa Musa ( his actual name is Kanku Musa, "mansa" means king).

Common Mandinka last names in Mali : Keita, Kanté, Koné, Konaté

Soninké/Sarakolé are dominant in the Kaye region of Mali, with some populations in Senegal, Gambia and Mauritania. In Mali, we call them Maraka, but some of them don’t like it and rather be called Soninké.

Common Soninke last names are : Gassama, Wagué, Soumaré, Tounkara, Doucouré, Soueré, Sylla, Bathily, Fadiga, Fofona, Camara/Kamara, Diaby/Jaby, Diawara/Jawara, Cissé/Sesay and so on.

Jula/Dyula means merchants in Malinké and are a sub group of Mandé. The term Jula/Dyula is often used in Cote D'Ivoire.

Bambara broke off from the main Mandinka and created their own kingdom because they didn’t want to convert to Islam. They created their own culture and kingdoms from everyone else. Bambara are dominant in Mali, with some population in Burkina Faso.

Common Bambara names: Traoré/Trawaly, Coulibaly, Diarra, Boiré, Dembelé, Bamba, Katile

The Importance of Last Names in Mande society

Last names are very important in our culture. It defines your caste (which some people still follow), your ethnicity and family history. The history of last names is actually common knowledge in Mali and plays a big part on how we interact with one and other.

“Mandé Mory” Marabout Class.

Marabout back in the day meant someone who was wise, a teacher, an educator, and someone that was very spiritual and had knowledge in herbs and religion. The meaning changed over time. In 2020, the term marabout is interchangeable with witch doctor but there was a time when marabouts were religious guides that had Islamic knowledge and thought it to the locals.

Marabout last names : Toure/Turay ,Sylla,Cisse/Sessay, Kaba, Dramé.

Those names have Soninke origins. Quite a few Cissé and even Touré in Mali are Fulanis. I'll some Fulani names later.

“Djely”,"Jaly" Griots.

A big part of Mandé culture is oral traditions and Djelys' role is to perverse the tradition. They specialized in Mandé history, family history, music/singing/instruments, good speech and praising. They come to ceremonies like weddings and baptism on behalf of their Diatigui (the ones they “work” for.). They are also used to resolve conflicts.

Examples of griots last names : Kouyaté, Diabiate, Kante, Soumano, Kamisoko

Sinanangouya/Sanankouya :

It’s an “alliance” or call “cousinage” in French, where clans in the Mandinka society can help, joke/tease with one and other based on last names but also on ethnic groups. It was created under the rule of Soundjata Keita to appease clans and ethnic tensions. For examples, Coulibaly’s and Keita’s can tease with each other and none of them can be offended. The only rule under Sinangouya is that groups can’t shed blood or physically hurt each other."

**
bebelala, Sep 24, 2020
 #3
"I'll add the meaning of some individual last names later . I plan to add some fulani last names that common in the region as well because their are some intersect with Mande names."

**
Lady2023, Sep 24, 2020
#16
…. "Many Mandinka in Gambia also have some of these last names. I guess bc we are all part of the same extended family with the Soninkes there are some last names in common."

**
Bebelala
Sep 24, 2020, last edited September 25, 2020

#20
"The History and meaning of the Name Traore

 The history of the Traoré family is inseparable from that of Tiramakhan Traoré, a Mandingo general who lived in the 13th century. After Soundiata Keita's victory against King Soumahoro Kanté, the new king of Mandé sends these generals to annex new territories and that is what Tiramakhan Traoré will do, he also founded the Kaabunké (also called the Kaabu kingdom) in the current Senegal after defeating the King of Bainouk, the Traoré clan begins to reign supreme in the region. ….

That's not all, a few century later, the Traoré founded the kingdom of Kénédougou in present-day Mali, this state is best known thanks to Babemba Traoré who leads a fierce resistance to the French colonial troops.

Meaning

Originally, the surname Traoré is written Tarawele, it is difficult to give it an exact etymology but several theory circulates on the meaning of the name. The first theory (the best known) indicates that Tarawele means "will call him". This theory holds its meaning thanks to the scholar Solomana Kanté who presents in one of these books a warrior by the name of Touraman Koroba (Old Touraman) who was a great warrior before the advent of Soundiata, he had defended and protected the Manden a lot. .

After his retirement, the country was attacked by a powerful enemy army which was on the verge of defeating Manden's army, it was said that it was necessary to call the old Touraman to come and lend a hand to the army, otherwise the the enemy will triumph. This is how old Touraman got up and saddled his horse to go and fight the enemy and he managed to save the Manden. Some decade after the victory the djelis (griots) of Manden began to praise the descendants of Touraman Koroba by saying "aw Bemba Tara wèlé ka kélé ban" (they called your ancestor to defeat the enemy army). Touraman is also the ancestor of the two Tarawele brothers who killed the Do Forest buffalo called: Dan Massa Wulani and Dan Massa Wulamba.

The little brother, Dan Massa Wulamba also bore the first name of Touraman the Elder.

The big brother, Dan Massa Wulani took the surname Diabaté.

Another theory (less known) indicates that before having the name Tarawele, the clan was called Trawoulé. Tra means heat and Woulé means red, all of which is pronounced Trawoulé which designates a tough guy."

**
bebelala, Sep 25, 2020

#22
"The History and Meaning of the name Kouyate

The history of the KOUYATE clan is inseparable from that of Balla Fasséké. This man was Soundiata KEITA's personal djeli, bequeathed to him by his father. By maneuvers, he was delighted with this one by his brother Dankaran Touman and was subsequently delighted with the latter by Soumaoro Kanté the king of Sosso. One day while he was held hostage at the king of Sosso Soumaoro Kanté (the emblematic enemy of soundiata), Balla Fasseke, in the absence of the king of Sosso entered the most secret room of the palace, where Soumaoro kept his fetishes. He was then drawn to an instrument, a large balafon like he had never seen. The King of Sosso kept this xylophone in this secret chamber and he was the only one to play it because it was a mystical balafon. It was the Sosso bala. He therefore entered this secret chamber of the king of Sosso and immediately began to play this instrument. Alerted and amazed by the sounds coming from the Sosso bala, Soumaoro Kanté rushed to his secret room and saw the djeli (griot). Although charmed by the harmonious sounds, the clear notes, pure as gold dust that the balafon emitted, Soumaoro Kanté became mad with rage and decided to imprison Balla Fasseke. It is said that the imprisonment of Balla Fasséké is one of the events that triggered the battle of Soundiata Kéita against Soumaoro Kanté. It is said that King Sosso had Balla Fasseke's Achilles tendons cut to prevent him from running away. …

Meaning

After having imprisoned and mutilated Balla Fassaké Soumaoro will give him a ton of nicknames: "é Balla fa se Ke" that is to say "you who can make the bala speak" and "An Kun Yan Tè “which means“ we cannot talk about this ”, in other words“ we have a secret. ”This last nickname will become the surname of all the descendants of Balla Fasseke.

The patronymic will be French in KOUYATÉ. However, many djelis (griots) bring up the origin of the KOUYATÉ at the time of DAKOUMA DAKO DOUA the father of Balla Fasseke."

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From https://www.lipstickalley.com/threads/%E2%80%9Cafrican-last-name%E2%80%9D-spin-off-mand%C3%A9-last-name-meaning-and-history.3945451/page-2

bebelala, Sep 25, 2020,
#31
…."[Soninkes] are a powerful group. A lot of rich and business men in Mali are soninke. They were the first to migrate in mass to Paris, Mali and send money back home…..

…. Interesting about the Soninke last names. They actually have a lot of last names too. Migration, mixing, people adopting new last names over the years could explain it. These days many names like Traore are been held by people of multiple ethnic groups."

**
Lady2023 Sep 25, 2020
#33 [Pancocojams Editor: This comment is written in response to comment #31].
"Yes, it must be due to some migration & intermixing. When some ethnic groups migrate to a certain area, some of them get absorbed into the larger population and adopt a new cultural identity but still maintain the surnames the from the old cultural identity. As long as they have sons, the name lives on."

**
Bebelala, Sep 25, 2020
#46
"BestFwends said:

@SnakeWithHands

I didn't get an answer in the last thread but if you are familiar with the Mandingo tribe let me quote that post.

Are they not a popular tribe in comparison to the Igbos, Yorubas, Maasais and Zulus?

Mandingo is the English translation of the French name Manding. Mandingo is a significant ethnic group in West Africa but they broke down into multiple groups like Soninke, Susu, Mande, Bambara and so on. 

The term Mandingo is what American described a “big black” man. Im going to let Americans describe the significance of the name tho"

**
Bebelala,  Sep 27, 2020
#54
"Meaning and history of the name Keita

I - History

The first to bear this surname is the famous Diata Konaté, better known as Soundiata Keïta. The latter is the founder of the Mandingo Empire, one of the most powerful states on the continent. The Keïta family will lead the Mandingo Empire from the beginning until the decline of the empire, all the mansas (kings) will be members of this dynasty, except two. In the 12th century, the Mandé region was divided into three provinces ruled by the Malinké clans: the Condé ruled over the Do province, the Camara over the Bouré and the Keïta / Konaté allied with the Traoré in the Kiri. Around 1050, the Keita / Konaté clan won out over the others.

II - Meaning On the death of Naré Maghann Konaté, his eldest son Dankaran Toumani succeeds him on the throne, he will be replaced a few years later by his younger brother Soundiata. The people of the country and of the other kingdoms called the two brothers: Keyéta, which means "the heirs" in old Malinké, the word will later become Keita. The history of Keita is inseparable from that of Konaté, in fact, Keïta is equivalent to Konaté."

**
bebelala, Sep 27, 2020
#55
"The meaning and history of Camara/Kamara

I - History

The Camara/Kamara are considered to be the oldest family to have lived in Mandé (historic land of the Mandingo people) after having left, due to the drought, Oualata, a region of Wagadou (Empire of Ghana), in south-eastern Mauritania today. They founded the first villages of Mandé: Kirikoroni, Kirina, Sibi and Kita. Several large cities of the Empire of Ghana were founded by the Camara (or Kamara). The city of Niani (historical capital of the Mandingo Empire) was also founded by Camara (or Kamara), Niani is founded by Kolomba Kamara; four generations after him comes Kolinkin Kamara, whose son is Niani Massa Kara Kamara. the Kamara are subsequently led to abandon Niani because of an epidemic, either sleeping sickness or yellow fever and will settle in several other towns in the upper Niger valley, including Niani-Kouroula, Niani in the mountain, before moving to Dakadjalan.

II - Meaning

Kâ means in old Soninké case, hut and by extension, household, clan, village, fortress as for “Mara” he means to keep and in the imperative, that gives, “guard”. Camara (or Kamara) then means: l man who protects the fortress or the man who takes care of the house, the protector for short. The Kamissoko, Doumbia or Kourouma (it's the same name), Coulibaly, Fofana, Sissoko, Tounkara or Toungara, Cissé, Magassouba families, and the list is not exhaustive, are sinangous (joking relatives) of the Camara."

**
https://www.lipstickalley.com/threads/%E2%80%9Cafrican-last-name%E2%80%9D-spin-off-mand%C3%A9-last-name-meaning-and-history.3945451/page-3

Bebelala, Oct 14, 2020
#69
'The "Fulanis of Wassoulou"
 The Wassoulou was reportedly founded by Kali Diallo who came with a wave of Fulanis from the Fouta Djallon. They were for looking refuge from a Mandinka king. This King redirected them to his rival Bambara king called Solon and told them "Ayewa Balon Bare" meaning "Go to Solon" which is how the name Wassolon (or Wassulu/Wassoulou) came about.

Some Mandinka clans admired the Wassoulouke (people of Wassoulou) who worked hard in the agricultural field. The Mandinka adopted their last names and some Wassoulou married into the local Mandinka population. Over time, the Wassoulou became "mandinsised" and the Fulani language got lost as well as the stereotypical Fulani "look". The language was officially extinct in the reign of Samory Toure who outlaw speaking Fulani (could be sentence to death).

There are Wassoulou last name and their supposed Fulani equivalent :

Diallo - Dial

Sangare - Barry

Sidibe - Sow

Diakite - Bah"

The biggest promoter of Wassoulou music ever is without a doubt Oumou Sangare

But there are many others that are well known in Mali. Unfortunately, many of them have past away."….

**
Bebelala, Oct 14, 2020
#71
"Lady2023 said:
Do the Foulanke have their own dialect? You said they are a mix of Peul and Malinke. Is their language a mix of both languages? It’s just interesting that they’ve branched off and formed their own group. Also, the name “Foulanke” is interesting. It sounds like a mix of “Fulani” and “Malinke”. I know Peul is the French word for Fulani.

I just did a post about the Wassoulou. They don't have their dialect, the Fulani language got lost over time. There is another group thought, the Kassonke, who are mix of Fulani and Mande and they have their distinct culture as well as their own language. They have last names Mandinka/Soninke last names like Sissoko, Konate, but also Wassoulou last names like Sidibe, Diakite. "

**
Bebelala, Oct 15, 2020
#75
"Lady2023 said:
Wow, so Toure forced them to become Mandinka. It seems like the[y] are just Mandinka now.

Do you know how they determine this equivalence?

They had already embraced many aspects of Mandé culture including the language and barely spoke Fulani. Touré just put the nail in the coffin.

As for the names, it's really just the Mandinka fulani name. Fulanis have many subgroups/caste. For example, according to Fulani griot, Diakité belongs in the group of the Diallubé - which includes Fulani names like Diaw, Diallo, Kane, Ka, Dicko.

Sangaré belongs in the Nduyebé which includes Fulani names like Barry, Shangari, Sankara (Thomas Sankara's father was a mix of Fulani and Mossi)".

**
Killian_Ivory, Oct 15, 2020
#76
…."I noticed that usually Senoufo have names like Coulibaly, Kone, Toure, Diarrasouba, Ouattara, Bamba. ...

Btw, Mande names have their equivalent in Senoufo culture too. The Senoufo families that kept their original names are usually not muslim.

Soro - Coulibaly

Tuho/Tuo - Diarrasouba

Silue - Kone

Sekongo-can be Traore or Sanogo

Yeo - Ouattara"....

**
https://www.lipstickalley.com/threads/%E2%80%9Cafrican-last-name%E2%80%9D-spin-off-mand%C3%A9-last-name-meaning-and-history.3945451/page-4

Lady2023, Oct 21, 2020
#107
nubianDutch said:
Wow thank you for sharing. My mom is a sesay and my dad kamara. Although we claim sierra leone my grandpa from my mom side has always claimed that his parent came from mali. On my dad side from guinea originally. My dads mom is susu/fula but his dad is temne fula. So interesting

In Gambia Kamara (we spell it Camara) is mostly a Mandinka name and can also be found among some Soninke. Sesay (spelled Ceesay in Gambia) is usually Mandinka as well. I have a Guinean friend who told me that Camara is also Mandinka over there. I’m not surprised your grandpa said you guys are from Mali. The Mandinka are originally from Mali."

**
bebelala, Oct 21, 2020
#108
"History of the name Konaté

The history of the Konaté family is inseparable from that of Mamady Kani Konaté, he was a hunter king, and most likely one of the first Manding king. He was considered a great hunter in his time, tamer of wild animals and healer of men and animals. He invented the sîmbo or soumbo, a hunting whistle: with the aid of the latter he entered into communication with the geniuses of the bush. His disciples were so numerous that he united them to form a great formidable army. Thanks to his army, he became king of a vast country which stretched from Sankarani to Bouré. He had four sons: Kani Simbo, Kanignogo Simbo, Kabala Simbo and Simbo Bamari Tagnogokelin. They were all introduced to hunting, which earned them the title of Simbo.

Simbo Bamari had for son Mbalinéné, who had for son Bello Bakon or Fakon.

Bakon/Fakon had a son named Naré Maghan Kon Fata Konaté.

Nare Kon Fata who was also known as Frakro Maghan Keïgni, or Maghan "the Handsome", had a son named Soundiata Keita.

The Konaté are the descendents of the brothers, or uncles that did not reign the Mandé kingdom

The Konaté, Konaré and Keita last names are from the same family.

A Konaté can accept to be called Keita but a Keita can never called a Konaté.

Meaning

According to the elders, this name comes from the story of a Malinke man who, although married, was not fortunate enough to have children. Unable to bear being the laughing stock of the whole village, the man left his native village to settle in his mother's. Once settled there, his uncles gave him a young wife in marriage. He had a child with his new wife. Later, he had a second child, then a third, then a fourth. The inhabitants of his native village who were passing through there were surprised to find that the one they called infertile and helpless, was in fact fertile.

"He is not infertile" is translated, in Malinké, by the expression "KONNAN-TÊH "

**
bebelala, Oct 21, 2020
#109
"The History of Keita

The first to bear this surname is the famous Diata Konaté, better known as Soundiata Keïta or Sogonlo Diatta Keyta .

The latter is the founder of the Mandingo Empire, one of the most powerful states on the continent. The Keïta family will lead the Mandingo/Mandinka/Mandé Empire from the beginning until the decline of the empire, all the mansas (kings) will be members of this dynasty, except two.

In the 12th century, the Mandé region was divided into three provinces ruled by the Malinké clans: the Condé ruled over the Do province, the Camara over the Bouré and the Keïta / Konaté allied with the Traoré in the Kiri. Around 1050, the Keita / Konaté clan won out over the others.

Meaning

Keita translate in Malinke "A Ti Ke Ta" which means " he took it/ he inherited". Therefore, Soundiata/Sogonlo Konate, became Soundiata Keita, the Mandé Mansa/King.

Keita is the royal name, that later became a clan and nowadays, Keitas are the descendants of this clan

Soundiata Keita's story is very well known in Mali. I plan to post his story later. "…

**
Lady2023, Oct 29, 2020
#111
"The series on Sundiata is interesting. I’m curious to see where his descendants ended up. I was told by a family member that he’s our ancestor. I look forward to the next part.

SnakeWithHands said:
When born, Sundiata received the name "Diatta" or "Djata" which means Lion in Mandinka. The "Sun" comes from his mother's name "Songolon".

This is an interesting fact. In Gambia, we have a Mandinka surname which is Diatta (spelled Jatta in Gambia). Does that surname exist in Mali?

Also, I have another question for you that’s not related to Sundiata. Does Mali have a group called the Mandinka separate from the Bambara?

**
bebelala, Oct 29, 2020
#112
"In Mali, the surname close to Jatta is Diarra, which means lions are well. But Diarra and the history of the name are not really related to Sundiata. I'll post the history and meaning of Diarra later

Yes, the Mandinkas are called the Mandinka in Mali or Malinké in French and are separate from the Bambara. But I think there way more Bambara people than there are Mandinka in Mali. But I wonder if that's because the Bambara language is the lingua franca language in Mali. Mandinkas are far more numerous in Guinea."

**
https://www.lipstickalley.com/threads/%E2%80%9Cafrican-last-name%E2%80%9D-spin-off-mand%C3%A9-last-name-meaning-and-history.3945451/page-5 

bebelala, Dec 7, 2020
#163
"Name and history of the name Haidara 

Also spelled Aidara, is a name that's quite common in Mali. Soninkes, Fulanis, Songhais, Bambaras and Mandinkas can carry the name.

The name itself has arabic/moorish origins. It comes from the word arabic word for lion ''Asad/Asada/Haydar".

Haidaras are considered to be nobles. It says that people with this last name are descended for the Prophet Mohamed from this daughter Fatima, which I think is none sense."

**
bebelala, Dec 7, 2020
#168
'
History and Meaning of Touré

Also known as Tourey or Turé in anglophone countries

Touré is from the Soninké word, elephant, "tuure". The elephant was a animal that well respected among the Soninkés especially in the kingdom lead by Kaya Maghan Cissé. Cissé's personal guard was often called tuure since the animal represented force, power and intelligence.

Touré and the last name Samaké are related.

Since, Sama = elephant, Ke= person/human

In the 18th century, Tourés, along with with Cissés, Berethés, became the "Mandé Mory", the spiritual teachers and founders of Islam in the Mandé society. Due to this, the last spread and the name can be found in Soninkes, Fulanis, Mandinkas, Songhais and Bambaras."

**
bebelala, Dec 19, 2020
#172
"The 4 founding Fulani clan

 -Sow

-Diallo/Jallow

-Bah/Ba

-Barry

 As we all know, the origin of the Fulanis is a question that has sparked debates among anthropologists, archaeologists and historians. Oral tradition traces them back to Ethiopia, Egypt and even Berbers (north africa), at the time of a mythical union between two beings who gave birth to the ancestors of the four founding clans: Barry, Diallo, Sow and Ba.

 In the Fulani imagination, these clans are linked to the four elements (fire, air, water, earth) and to the four colors of the coats of bovines (yellow, red, black, white). Because the essence of the Fulani is intimately linked to the cow and to pastoralism."

**
Lady2023, Dec 19, 2020
#173
"SnakeWithHands said:

The 4 founding Fulani clan

 -Sow

-Diallo/Jallow

-Bah/Ba

-Barry

The majority of Fulanis will have one of these four surnames.

**
bebelala, Dec 23, 2020

#174
"The History and meaning of Coulibaly (Also spelled Koulibaly or Krubally)

The Coulibaly story in this article is that of the Coulibaly people who lived in the Ghana Empire before settling in Bélédougou and then on the banks of the Niger River. This version of history was collected from the Coulibaly families and not from the griots. These Coulibalys are found in the circles of Nioro, Kita and Diéma (East of Mali)

According to this version, Coulibaly is a Bambara name given after the end of Wagadou, to a group who lived on the heights of the Mandingo mountains, between the countries of Sobra and Siby. According to Soninké traditions, the Coulibalys venerated the Mandingo mountains and especially the mountain of Sobra (north of Narena) which also served them as an observation point to monitor the enemy coming from Mande. The inhabitants of this natural barrier were called Kouloubali (koulou = mountain, bali = obstacle) and meaning "those who prevent the enemy from the heights".

Another tradition collected among the Bambara griots, reports that the word Coulibaly is another deformation. The Niangolo and Baramangolo brothers, who came from Kong and Pursued by assailants, reached the Niger river but couldn't find any canoes to cross it. They will nevertheless succeed in crossing it thanks to a catfish, which, according to this version, would have metamorphosed into a bridge or would have transported them on its back.

From this episode, the two brothers will take the name of "Coulibaly", Kulun-Bali meaning in Bambara "Without Pirogue" (Kulun = "Pirogue", Bali = "Without", Negation). This would also be the origin of the food ban of catfish for the Coulibaly.

**
bebelala, Jan 19, 2021
#178
Lady2023 said:
@SnakeWithHands Are you familiar with this Malian player in France? Moussa Sissoko? Is he Soninke or Bambara/Mandinka?...

Sissoko is originally Soninke. It means horse or from the horse word. It’s a very common last name but it’s not extremely widespread like Toure, Traore or Cisse.

I am not very familiar with him at all but I am ready to bet that he is Soninke origin.

Soninkes were among the first Malians to immigrate to France and it became a trend for everyone. So tons of Malians and children of Malian immigrants in France are Soninke origin."

****
From https://www.lipstickalley.com/threads/%E2%80%9Cafrican-last-name%E2%80%9D-spin-off-mand%C3%A9-last-name-meaning-and-history.3945451/page-7

PeterPanSwag
Jan 21, 2021
#183
"Adding more surnames. I am from Cote D'ivoire so these are some common mande names there. Some of those mentioned already are popular there so I won't mention them.

Diarra, Lasso, Sakho, Dosso, Gbané, Doucouré Doumbia, Diomandé, Sanogo/sanon, Bamba, Soumahoro, Cissoko, Kamissoko, Mané, Sané, Sawané, Sangaré, Sidibé Dembelé, Dramé, Diakité, Ouattara, Bertha, Fakholy."

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.


Monday, June 21, 2021

Oumou Sangaré - "Kamelaba" - (Mali, West African singer video, information, and comments)



AfrikafestivalHertme, Jan 10, 2018

The Malinese diva, Oumou Sangaré, returns to the Africa Festival in Hertme after 24 years. After years of silence she is back: West African diva Oumou Sangaré is celebrated for her bright voice, her fresh, sensual songs and her power.

On her 18th, she still sang on the street in Bamako, Mali, but three years later Oumou Sangaré celebrated her great international breakthrough with her energetic, danceable songs. The success of her 1990's debut album Moussoulou ("Women") was partly due to her lyrics, which were openly taboo-breaking.

In 1993 she was a 25-year-old young woman at the stage in Hertme.

Anno 2017, Oumou Sangaré is a diva and a role model for women in Africa. She dares to challenge controversial subjects such as polygamy and female circumcision, but she also denotes female sensuality. With her bright voice and her unique, fresh approach to traditional music from hunters from the Wassoulou area, she also enjoys enchanting a Western audience. Beginning 2017, her new album will appear on the French label Nø Førmat!

[...]

Oumou Sangaré, lead song

Guimba Kouyaté, guitar

Elise Blanchard, bass guitar

Kandy Guira, background song

Jon Grandcamp, drums

Abou Diarra, Camel n'goni

Emma Lamadji, background song

Alexandre Millet, Keyboards

[…]

Song: Kamelemba

Artist: Oumou Sangaré

Album: Mogoya

****
Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases a YouTube video of Mali, West African singer Oumou Sangaré.

Information about Oumou Sangaré is  included in this post along with a few comments from this video's discussion thread.

This post also include information the meaning of the Mandé language name "Boubacar" and the meaning of the Arabic name "Ali" as well as a few selected comments from the discussion thread of this showcased video.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, educational, entertainment, onamastic, and aesthetic purposes. 

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to 
Oumou Sangaré for her musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

****
ADDITIONAL BIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION ABOUT OUMOU SANGARE 
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oumou_Sangar%C3%A9
"Oumou Sangaré (Bambara: Umu Sangare; born 25th February, 1968 in Bamako) is a Grammy Award-winning Malian Wassoulou musician, sometimes referred to as "The Songbird of Wassoulou". Wassoulou is a historical region south of the Niger River, where the music descends from age-old traditional song, often accompanied by a calabash.

[…]

Sangaré recorded her first album, Moussoulou ("Women"), with Amadou Ba Guindo, a renowned maestro of Malian music. The album was very successful in Africa, with more than 200,000 copies sold.

With the help of Ali Farka Touré, Sangaré signed with the English label World Circuit. At the age of 21, she was already a star.

Oumou Sangaré is considered an ambassador of Wassoulou; her music has been inspired by the music and traditional dances of the region. She writes and composes her songs, which often include social criticism, especially concerning women's low status in society.

Since 1990 she has performed at some of the most important venues in the world, such as the Melbourne Opera, Roskilde Festival, Gnaoua World Music Festival, WOMAD, Oslo World Music Festival, and the Opéra de la Monnaie.

Many of Sangaré's songs concern love and marriage, especially freedom of choice in marriage. Her 1989 album Moussoulou was an unprecedented West African hit. In 1995, she toured with Baaba Maal, Femi Kuti, and Boukman Eksperyans. Other albums include Ko Sira (1993), Worotan (1996), and a 2-CD compilation Oumou (2004), all released on World Circuit Records. Sangaré supports the cause of women throughout the world. She was named an ambassador of the FAO in 2003 and won the UNESCO Prize in 2001 and was made a Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters of France in 1998.

Sangaré is featured prominently in Throw Down Your Heart, a 2008 documentary about world-renowned American banjo player Béla Fleck, and his exploration of the relatively unknown relationship between his instrument and the musical traditions in Africa.

Sangaré contributed vocals to "Imagine" for the 2010 Herbie Hancock album The Imagine Project, which also featured Seal, P!nk, India.Arie, Jeff Beck, Konono Nº1 and others."...

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WHAT THE NAME "OUMOU" MEANS
Oumou is Mande languages form of the Arabic name  "Umm".

Here's information about the Arabic name "Umm" from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umm_(given_name) 
"
Umm (أمّ) means mother in Arabic. It is a common Arabic feminine alias, and used to be a common feminine given name, with the masculine counterpart being Ab or Abu. "...

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MORE COMMENTS ABOUT THE NAME "OUMOU"
From https://themeaningofthename.com/oumou/

[Pancocojams Editor's Note: The following two comments were written in response to this statement from the editors of that website]
..."Oumou is not a popular first name. It is more often used as a girl (female) name.

People having the name Oumou are in general originating from France.”…

Comment #1: Maryam Sy,  28 March 2016
"Oumou is not a French name. It's popular in France because of the Muslim African and Arabic population. Oumou or Umu for Arabic folks means "Mother Of" for exemple Umu Ahmad means Mother of Ahmad. In a more general meaning Oumou means mother , the one who nurture, the one who keep the family together.”

**
Comment #2: Oumou Bah, 11 August 2017
"Not popular because you are using the American/Western frame of reference where anything outside of the norm is foreign and odd. If you look at the prevalence of the name in Guinea (where my family is from) or Senegal, Mali, etc you will find it to be relatively common. By the way, the meaning translated to Arabic is "mother." Other variations of the name can be found in Arab countries: Oumia, Umia, Umu, etc. Pronounced: Ooo-Moo "

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SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS VIDEO'S DISCUSSION THREAD 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWCvQxkmPY0&ab_channel=AfrikafestivalHertmeAfrikafestivalHertme


[Numbers are added for referencing purposes only.

1. Kadiatou Konate, 2018
"
La Diva du Mali👏👏👏👏"
-snip-
Google translate from French to English:
Mali's Diva.

**
2. Chumza, 2019
"I'm from south Africa i don't know what she saying but she bring tears in my eyes i played this song a 100 times"


**
Reply
3. Doussouba DIAKITE, 2019
"Chumza she talks about the love of unfaithful men who still runs to other women after they finish their job, that love hurts times because for some of the badboy men these just to joke and play.  she asks forgiveness to these men if he has crossed not to joke, play and fall, she asks for the blessing of her mother and are father so that today she falls on this kind of guy if not at risk of destabilizing her by  big these what she says in her song"

**
Reply
4. Minata Coulibaly, 2020
"She is talking about men who give false  expectations to women. The woman is complaining about this men."

**
5. Mamadou DAO, 2019
"Oumou Sang c'est mon artiste préféré au Mali"
-snip-
Google translate from French to English:
"Oumou Sang is my favorite artist in Mali"

**
6. Youkoulé Coulibaly, 2019
"I love you Mother oumou sangaré , tu es la fièrté de notre Maliba
-snip-
Google translate from French to English
"You are the pride of our Maliba"
-snip-
"Mali ba" = "great Mali" [one Source for this translation: https://lyricstranslate.com/en/mali-ba-great-mali.html#translations

**
7. 
Jordan Ford, 2020
"have listened to this on repeat the last few days, this is giving me life"

**
8. 
L King, 2020
"During these troubled times this is just what I needed. I’m blasted this through the house. Peace and Blessings !"

**
9. Dramane Coulibaly, 2021
"La Diva au top fier d'être africains , Oumou je t'aime"
-snip-
Google translate from French to English:
"The Diva at the top proud to be African, Oumou I love you"

**
10. Tigistu Siba, 2021
"An amazing and spiritual music!  As I feel It, this music is  is a peace and love message."

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Boubacar Traoré & Ali Farka Touré - "Duna Ma Yelema" (Mali, West African guitarists/singers video, information, & comments)



NoBorders Campos, May 8, 2013

****
Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases a YouTube video of Mali, West African guitarists/ singers Boubacar Traoré & Ali Farka Touré.

Information about Boubacar Traoré and Ali Farka Touré are included in this post along with a few comments from this video's discussion thread.

Information the 
the meaning of the Mandé language name "Boubacar" and the meaning of the Arabic name "Ali".

The content of this post is presented for cultural, educational, entertainment, onamastic, and aesthetic purposes. 

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to 
Boubacar Traoré and Ali Farka Touré for their musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THE DISCUSSION THREAD FOR THIS VIDEO
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4-uq8cTF7o&ab_channel=NoBordersCamposNoBordersCampos

(Numbers are dded for referencing purposes only) 

1. James Agyen, 2019
"Far away from that. This is what I found from the Reddit about the song Duna Ma Yelema:

Duna ma yelema, bi ma de yelema la

the world has not changed, it is the people of today have changed

Ni kokè mousso mi yé , o bi maflé nalomayé

if you do something for a woman, she thinks you're an idiot

Ni kokè tié ba mi yé , o bi maflé fiyentoyé

if you do something for a man, he thinks you're blind

oh Na , Duna ma yelema, bi ma de yelema la ....

oh mother , ...
-snip-
2. Yacouba Diankha, 2021
"Good translation 👍🏽"

** 
3. J Lynch, 2019
"I can hear the foundations for blues but also reggae, especially when they play the off-beat guitar strokes. Just wow"

**
4. Abdoul Raouf Cisse, 2019
"They just saying in the song : the world didn't change but people changed. ( Dunia ma yelema, bi ma de yelemana)"

**
5. Nyambati Kwamboka, 2019
"
They must have some bantu thing going on in their blood because dunia is in Kiswahili back home...I love African music...it resonates everwhere with many other Africans...so lovely my people...so lovely...God bless you my people! God bless you! ☺"

**
Reply
6. Hawkeye, 2019
"Dunia  is also in Arabic."

**
Reply
7. Khaya Mwelase, 2019
"Aaahhh man! Thank you for translation"

**
Reply
8. Athanasios Tsagkadouras, 2019
"Damn we use the word "dunia" in my home country GREECE to say " the world " haha that's funny. It seems like it's arabic, and we say it as we got affected by the Ottoman empire in the past through some language word exchange."

**
Reply
9. mustafa juventino, 2019
"@Athanasios Tsagkadouras  is it some kind of a dialect?"

**
Reply
10. Athanasios Tsagkadouras, 2019
"@mustafa juventino  actually its mostly used in villages and not at big major cities in Greece. Thanks for asking!"

**
Reply
11. saveasav1, 2019
"@Athanasios Tsagkadouras  In Hindi too. And many other languages, which I just found out: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunya"

**
Reply
12. Zoë Wilms, 2019
"In Malagasy too Donia [doonia] = Dunia"

**
Reply
13. Abdoul Raouf Cisse, 2019
"Mali is 95 percent Muslim,  so we have many words from the Qur'an that influenced our dialect. In fact they are two people from different regions,  boubacar is from the south which has some vegetation and Ali farka is from the north in the region of Timbuktu which is the desert. Islam came through the north of the country to the south. Plus lot of people in Mali say the northern people originally come from Yemen, a country that speaks Arabic 🤷🏽‍♂"

*️*
Reply
14. DaltonCulture, 2019
"Dunia also means the world in Bahasa, the Indonesian language"

**
Reply
15. Alem Ghebreab, 2019
"
@Nyambati Kwamboka  The word Aladunya in Arabic which means the world and is the root for both Kiswahili (which is a mix of African and Arabic). Mali is also influenced a lot by Arabic speaking people there."

**
Reply
16. Arc, 2021
" @Nyambati Kwamboka  check out how yelema changes to yelemana. The Niger Congo language root structure alive and kicking."

**
Reply
17. Twinkle Arora, 2021
"What language is this that they sing in?"

**
Reply
18. Arc, 2021
"@Twinkle Arora  Bambara"

**
Reply
19. Joshua Ntuen, 2021
"Duniya is also the Hausa world"
-snip-
Written another way:“Duniya” is the Hausa word for “world”.

**
20. 
Moriarty, 2019
"Two of the most astounding pillars in the pantheon of guitar heaven"


**
21. London Logan, 2021
"Amazing. African blues. The origin that our ancestors brought over."

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INFORMATION ABOUT BOUBACAR TRAORE
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boubacar_Traor%C3%A9
"Boubacar Traoré (born 1942 in Kayes, Mali) is a Malian singer, songwriter, and guitarist.[1][2]

[...]

Boubacar figures in the book Mali Blues (Lonely Planet, Australia), by Belgian writer Lieve Joris. The book inspired Swiss film director Jacques Sarasin for the 2001 film Je chanterai pour toi ("I'll Sing For You") about Boubacar, released on DVD in 2005.

Along with several blues artists, he appeared in the film Blues Road Movie (Au Coeur du Blues) by Louis Mouchet (2001).

Boubacar then released Kongo Magni (Marabi, 2005), produced by Christian Mousset, director of the Festival Musiques Métisses d'Angoulême (Angoulême Cross-Cultural Music Festival), who would also produce his Mali Denhou (Lusafrica, 2010). Kar Kar made up for lost time with acclaimed live performances around Europe and then the United States and Canada. Mbalimaou (My Brothers) was released in February 2015, followed by Dounia Tabalo in November 2017."...

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INFORMATION ABOUT ALI FARKA TOURE
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ali_Farka_Tour%C3%A9
"Ali Ibrahim "Ali Farka" Touré (31 October 1939 – 6 March 2006)[1][2] was a Malian singer and multi-instrumentalist, and one of the African continent's most internationally renowned musicians.[3] His music blends traditional Malian music and its derivative, North American blues[4] and is considered a pioneer of African desert blues.[5] Touré was ranked number 76 on Rolling Stone's list of "The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time"[6] and number 37 on Spin magazine's "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time".[7]

Biography

Touré was born in 1939 in the village of Kanau, on the banks of the Niger River in Gourma-Rharous Cercle in the northwestern Malian region of Tombouctou. His family belonged to the Arma community and moved to the nearby village of Niafunké when he was still an infant.[8] His father died serving in the French Army in 1940.[9] He was the tenth son of his mother but the only one to survive past infancy. "The name I was given was Ali Ibrahim, but it's a custom in Africa to give a child a strange nickname if you have had other children who have died",[8] Touré was quoted as saying in a biography on his record label, World Circuit Records. His nickname, "Farka", chosen by his parents, means "donkey", an animal admired for its tenacity and stubbornness: "Let me make one thing clear. I'm the donkey that nobody climbs on!"[8] Ethnically, he was part Songhai, part Fula.[8]

As the first African bluesman to achieve widespread popularity on his home continent, Touré was often known as "the African John Lee Hooker".[10] Musically, the many superpositions of guitars and rhythms in his music were similar to John Lee Hooker's hypnotic blues style. He usually sang in one of several African languages, mostly Songhay, Fulfulde, Tamasheq or Bambara[8] as on his breakthrough album, Ali Farka Touré, which established his reputation in the world music community.”….

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WHAT THE NAME "BOUBACAR" MEANS
From 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boubacar
"Boubacar is both a surname and a given name. It is the West African adaptation of the Arabic name Abu Bakar."
-snip-
"West African adaptation" here largely refers to Mande languages:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mande_languages
"The Mande languages are spoken in several countries in West Africa by the Mandé peoples and include Maninka, Mandinka, Soninke, Bambara, Kpelle, Dioula, Bozo, Mende, Susu, and Vai. There are "60 to 75 languages spoken by 30 to 40 million people",[1] chiefly in Burkina Faso, Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Ivory Coast, and also in northwestern Nigeria and northern Benin."...

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From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abu_Bakr_(name)
"Abu Bakr (Arabic: أبو بكر‎) was a sahabi, one of the companions of Muhammad and the first Caliph of Islam. He was also Muhammad's father-in-law through Aisha. His real name was Abdullah or Abul-Kaaba and Abu Bakr was his kunya.

 The name, meaning "Father of young camel" (Abu meaning 'Father of' and Bakr meaning 'young camel'), is widely used by Sunni Muslims.[1] Other transliterations include Abu Bakar, Abu Bekr, Ebubekir, Aboubacar Abubakar , etc. The two parts of the name can be written together, hyphenated, or separately."

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WHAT THE NAME "ALI"  MEANS
From 
https://quranicnames.com/ali/
"
Ali is a direct Quranic name for boys that means “high”, “exalted”, “superb”, “sublime”. The word Ali is used in many places in the Quran and it forms one of the names of Allah when it is prefixed with an al, as in al-Ali. It is a common name among Muslims out of love for Ali bin Abi Talib, cousin of Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings of Allah upon him and his family and companions."...

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