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Sunday, April 22, 2018

Gospelized Spirituals & Other Non-Traditional Examples Of The African American Spiritual "Trampin"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part III of a three part pancocojams series on the African American Spiritual "Trampin'".

This post showcases some "non-traditional" African American YouTube examples of the "Spiritual" Trampin. (Note that one of these examples (given as Example #3 below) is sung by Rock & Roll great "Little Richard".

The Addendum to Part III showcases an example of "Trampin" that was recorded by the White American singer Patti Smith as that version appears to be the most widely known example of this song (based on Google searches).

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/edward-boatner-earliest-known-arranger.html for Part I of this series. Part I presents excerpts of two online biographical articles about Edward Boatner. The Addendum to that post includes additional online references to Edward Boatner as well as comments about the song "Trampin" from the online folk music forum "Mudcat".

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/youtube-examples-of-traditional.html for Part II of this series. Part II provides definitions for the word "trampin(g)" and includes some examples of floating verses from Spirituals which have been used in the renditions of "Trampin". Part II also showcases some YouTube examples of "traditional" renditions of "Trampin".

The content of this post is presented for religious and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are featured in the YouTube examples that are embedded in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these songs on YouTube.

****-
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
"African American Spirituals" is the term that I prefer to use for that body of music that has generally been referred to as "Negro Spirituals". I prefer the term "African American Spirituals" because "African American" is the formal term for this population as it replaced the outdated and now largely considered offensive term "Negro" in the 1970s.

It's my position that "spirituals" usually refers to certain religious songs composed by unknown Black Americans prior to the end of the 19th century. According to that position, I usually categorize religious songs that were and are composed by African Americans (or others) after the 19th century in the early 20th century -even those that have the same structure/s as Spirituals are usually categorized as "early Gospel" songs. I also used the term "Gospelized Spirituals" to describe arrangements of Spirituals in an African American Gospel style.

In the context of this post, the word "non-traditional" is used to refer to arrangements that I believe differ in some way or ways from the tune, tempo, and structure, and usually also in lyrics, to early collected or recorded arrangements of African American Spirituals. Many, but not all of these examples have more "gospelized" styles and/or more uptempo than the traditional arrangements.

****
DEFINITIONS FOR THE VERB "TRAMPIN(G)"
From https://www.thefreedictionary.com/tramping
"tramp (trămp)
v. tramped, tramp·ing, tramps
v.intr.
1. To walk with a firm, heavy step; trudge.
2.
a. To travel on foot; hike."

**
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tramp
"Definition of tramp
intransitive verb
1 : to walk, tread, or step especially heavily tramped loudly on the stairs
2 a : to travel about on foot : hike
b : to journey as a tramp
transitive verb
1 : to tread on forcibly and repeatedly
2 : to travel or wander through or over on foot have tramped all the woods on their property"
-snip-
Pancocojams Editor's Note:
I've included these definitions because the verb "trampin(g)" is rarely used nowadays in conversational English.
-snip-
Pancocojams Editor's Note:
I've included these definitions because the verb "trampin(g)" is rarely used nowadays in conversational English.

****
SHOWCASE YOUTUBE EXAMPLES
Example #1: Helen Robinson Youth Choir singing Trampin



Gospellin, Published on Feb 17, 2009

Jeanette Robinson on the lead
-snip-
Here's a comment from that video's publisher:
gospellin, 2009
"It'a an old Negro spiritual that has been re-arranged it's Trampin'.The record label also reads Trampin."

****
Example #2: Trampin'



Regina Carter – Topic, Published on Nov 8, 2014
Provided to YouTube by Sony Music Entertainment

Trampin' · Regina Carter

Southern Comfort

℗ 2013 Regina Carter, under exclusive license to Sony Music Entertainment

Released on: 2014-02-28

Composer: Traditional / Traditional / トラディショナル
Bass, Programmer, Arranger: Jesse Murphy


Released on: 2000-01-01

Auto-generated by YouTube.

****
Example #3: I'm Trampin'



Little Richard - Topic
Published on Nov 5, 2014
Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

I'm Trampin' · Little Richard

Long Tall Sally (Live)

℗ 2012 Dance Plant Records/TMC

Released on: 2012-05-10

Memphis Gospel Quartet Heritage, The 1980's: Happy in the Service of the Lord Volume 1
℗ 2000 Highwater Records
-snip-
Here are my transcriptions of the two floating verses that Little Richard sung as lead to this song:

Must Jesus Bare the cross alone
And all the world go free
Yes there’s a cross for everyone
And there’s a cross for me


Amazing grace how street the sound
that saved a wrench like me
I once was lost but now I’m found
was blind but now I see

****
Example #4: TRAMPIN'



Carl Wells, Published on Oct 22, 2016

Trampin'

Song arr. by Dr. Carl R. Wells
For the John Work Chorus
Of the Former Booker T. Washington High School

****
Example #4: Trampin'

Regina Carter – Topic, Published on Nov 8, 2014
Provided to YouTube by Sony Music Entertainment

Trampin' · Regina Carter

Southern Comfort

℗ 2013 Regina Carter, under exclusive license to Sony Music Entertainment

Released on: 2014-02-28

Composer: Traditional / Traditional / トラディショナル
Bass, Programmer, Arranger: Jesse Murphy

****
Example #5: Marian Anderson - "Trampin'"



Jenkem Chic, Published on Jul 31, 2017

20's Gospel/Musical version of "Trampin'" by Marian Anderson.
-snip-
Marion Anderson's rendition of "Trampin" is operatic. It's tempo is much slower than traditional renditions of this Spiritual that I have heard and sung.

****
ADDENDUM- Patti Smith's rendition of "Trampin"

Patti Smith Trampin'



macamaranik, Published on Sep 1, 2011
LYRICS
I'm trampin', trampin' Try'n a make heaven my home
I'm trampin trampin Try'n a make heaven my home...

I've never been to heaven But I've been told
Try'n a make heaven my home That the streets up there
Are paved with gold Try'n a make heaven my home

I'm trampin trampin Try'n a make heaven my home
I'm trampin trampin Try'n a make heaven my home...

-snip-
Here's some information about Patti Smith's version of "Trampin" from http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=32693
"Album: Trampin'
Released: 2004
“Patti Smith closes her Trampin' album with this title track, which is a traditional folk song written in the Gospel tradition. It is a collaboration between Smith's daughter Jesse Lee Smith's piano and Patti's voice. She explained to Uncut magazine October 2004: "I like Marion Anderson and I have a little space where I paint and take photographs and I often listen to Gospel records and spirituals. That little song, for the past couple of years, has always attracted me, and I asked my daughter if she would learn it on piano. That's my daughter playing and it's live, we just did it a couple of times and took one that was honest. And that's what we did. I'm very proud of her, I think she did a beautiful job. And I intentionally wanted it to have a modest approach, because it is a spiritual and I'm certainly not Marion Anderson. I intentionally wanted the song to have a very reflective, modest feel."
Smith said that she was attracted to the song as, "it does have a weary quality but it's optimistic." She added: "This person is trampin' trying to find Heaven, they're not just trying to get to the corner store, or just trying to get to a soup kitchen, they're going for the highest place. I like the little song, and there's a lot of miles tramped in this album, and I think it was a good way to end it." “

****
This concludes this three part series on "Trampin".

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

YouTube Examples Of Traditional Arrangements Of The African American Spiritual "Trampin"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a three part pancocojams series on the African American Spiritual "Trampin'".

This post provides definitions for the word "trampin(g)" and includes some examples of floating verses from Spirituals which have been used in the renditions of "Trampin". Part II also showcases some YouTube examples of "traditional" renditions of "Trampin".

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/edward-boatner-earliest-known-arranger.html for Part I of this series. Part I presents excerpts of two online biographical articles about Edward Boatner. The Addendum to that post includes additional online references to Edward Boatner as well as comments about the song "Trampin" from the online folk music forum "Mudcat".

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/gospelized-spirituals-other-non.html for Part III of this series. Part III showcases some "non-traditional" African American YouTube examples of the "Spiritual" Trampin. The Addendum to Part III also showcases an example of "Trampin" that was recorded by the White American singer Patti Smith as that version appears to be the most widely known example of this song (based on Google searches).

The content of this post is presented for religious and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are featured in the YouTube examples that are embedded in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these songs on YouTube.

****-
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
"African American Spirituals" is the term that I prefer to use for that body of music that has generally been referred to as "Negro Spirituals". I prefer the term "African American Spirituals" because "African American" is the formal term for this population as it replaced the outdated and now largely considered offensive term "Negro" in the 1970s.

I've added quotation marks to the word" spirituals" in this series because it's been my position that "spirituals" usually refers to certain religious songs composed by unknown Black Americans prior to the end of the 19th century. According to that position, religious songs that were and are composed by African Americans after the 19th century in the early 20th century -even those that have the same structure/s as Spirituals are categorized as "early Gospel" songs.

****
DEFINITIONS FOR THE VERB "TRAMPIN(G)"
From https://www.thefreedictionary.com/tramping
"tramp (trămp)
v. tramped, tramp·ing, tramps
v.intr.
1. To walk with a firm, heavy step; trudge.
2.
a. To travel on foot; hike."

**
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tramp
"Definition of tramp
intransitive verb
1 : to walk, tread, or step especially heavily tramped loudly on the stairs
2 a : to travel about on foot : hike
b : to journey as a tramp
transitive verb
1 : to tread on forcibly and repeatedly
2 : to travel or wander through or over on foot have tramped all the woods on their property"
-snip-
Pancocojams Editor's Note:
I've included these definitions because the verb "trampin(g)" is rarely used nowadays in conversational English.

****
SOME FLOATING VERSES THAT ARE MAY BE FOUND IN VERSIONS OF "TRAMPIN"
SAMPLE VERSES THAT ARE OFTEN FOUND IN "TRADITIONAL" VERSIONS OF "TRAMPIN'"
(These verses are given here in no particular order. If these verses are used in the Spiritual "Trampin" (or any other Spiritual), their order may vary and they may be repeated at other times in that song.)

Example Verse #1
Leader - I ('ve) never been to Heaven but I've been told
Group - (Tryin to make Heaven my home)
Leader - That the streets of Heaven are paved with gold
Group -(Tryin to make Heaven my home)

**
Example Verse #2
One of these mornings and it won't be long
(Tryin to make Heaven my home)
You'll look for me and I'll be gone
(Tryin to make Heaven my home)

**
Example Verse #3
If you get there before I do
(Tryin to make Heaven my home)
Just tell my friends I'm comin too
(Tryin to make Heaven my home)

**
Example Verse #4
I went to the valley but I didn't go to stay
(Tryin to make Heaven my home)
My soul got happy and I stayed all day
(Tryin to make Heaven my home)

**
Example Verse #5
Oh the River of Jordan is chilly and cold
(Tryin to make Heaven my home)
It chills my body but it warms my soul
(Tryin to make Heaven my home)

**
Example Verse #6
Ole Satan's mad and I am glad
(Tryin to make Heaven my home)
He lost a soul he thought he had
(Tryin to make Heaven my home)
-snip-
The first verse that was given ("I never been to heaven but I've been told" is usually but not always found in renditions of "Trampin".
-snip-
Update: April 22, 2018 -I just remembered the first verse of the version of "Trampin" that I sung in the 1950s or early to mid-1960s (in Atlantic City, New Jersey)

Leader -I heard the voice of Jesus say-a
Lord
Choir- Tryin to make Heaven my home
Leader- Come unto me-e; I'll give you rest-est
Choir- Tryin to make heaven my home.

-snip-
Another verse that we sang was:
Leader- If you don't believe I've been redeemed
Choir- Tryin to make Heaven my home
Leader- Just follow me down to Jordan stream
Choir- Tryin to make Heaven my home
-snip-
Also, I remember a man with a deep voice singing the words "Oh Lord, you know I'm" sometimes before the choir sang the "Trampin Trampin" chorus.

The arrangement that is most like the one I remember is given as Example #3 in Part III of this series. That happens to be the one that the Rock & Rock great Little Richard sang.

****
SHOWCASE YOUTUBE EXAMPLES
Example #1: Ken Hanson-'I'm Trampin' arr by Uzee Brown, Jr



Kenneth Hanson, Published on Apr 12, 2010

Kenneth Hanson in concert at Convent Avenue Baptist Church in NYC on Feb 28, 2010 accompanied by Gregory Hopkins in an arrangement by Uzee Brown, Jr. Mr. Hanson sings with the Harlem Jubilee Singers under the direction of Mr. Hopkins

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Example #2: Trampin' - Harlem Jubilee Singers



Arturo Carvajal, Published on Dec 12, 2011

****
Example #3: Trampin', Wings Over Jordan Choir - The Glory Of Black Gospel Volume 3



Pannellctp Traditional Gospel Music, Published on Jun 15, 2013

The Glory Of Black Gospel Volume 3 Release Date: 11/15/2001

****
Example #4: Trampin'



Various Artists – Topic, Published on Oct 1, 2015
Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

Trampin' · The Harmonizers

****
This concludes Part II of this three part series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Edward Boatner, The Earliest Known Arranger of The African American Spiritual Trampin & Certain Other African American Spirituals

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a three part pancocojams series on the African American Spiritual "Trampin'".

This post presents excerpts of two online biographical articles about Edward Boatner who appears to be the earliest arranger of that Spiritual and certain other Spirituals.

The Addendum to this post includes additional online references to Edward Boatner as well as comments about the song "Trampin" from the online folk music forum "Mudcat".

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/youtube-examples-of-traditional.html for Part II of this series. Part II provides definitions for the word "trampin(g)" and includes some examples of floating verses from Spirituals which have been used in the renditions of "Trampin". Part II also showcases some YouTube examples of "traditional" renditions of "Trampin".

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/gospelized-spirituals-other-non.html for Part III of this series. Part III showcases some "non-traditional" African American YouTube examples of the "Spiritual" Trampin. The Addendum to Part III also showcases an example of "Trampin" that was recorded by the White American singer Patti Smith as that version appears to be the most widely known example of this song (based on Google searches).

The content of this post is presented for historical, religious, cultural, and educational purposes.

As a reminder, I reprint portion of obscure or hard to find articles or books to raise awareness of those articles/books and their subject matter.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Edward Boatner for his musical and literary legacy and thanks all those who are quoted in this post.

****-
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
"African American Spirituals" is the term that I prefer to use for that body of music that has generally been referred to as "Negro Spirituals". I prefer the term "African American Spirituals" because "African American" is the formal term for this population as it replaced the outdated and now largely considered offensive term "Negro" in the 1970s.

It's my position that "spirituals" usually refers to certain religious songs composed by unknown Black Americans prior to the end of the 19th century. According to that position, I usually categorize religious songs that were and are composed by African Americans (or others) after the 19th century in the early 20th century -even those that have the same structure/s as Spirituals are usually categorized as "early Gospel" songs. I also used the term "Gospelized Spirituals" to describe arrangements of Spirituals in an African American Gospel style.

I acknowledge that Edward Boatner and Willa A. Townsend's 1927 book is titled Spirituals Triumphant, Old and New. However, I believe that the word "new" in this title refers to Boatner's arrangements for some of these songs, rather than newly composed songs that weren't based on older 19th century Spirituals. (Notice that the term "settings of..." is used in the quoted biography rather than the contemporary synonym "arrangements of".)

As such I think that Edward Boatner was the earliest arranger of the song "Trampin", not that song's original composer.

****
REPRINT OF ONLINE BIOGRAPHY OF EDWARD BOATNER (by Randye Jones)
From http://afrovoices.com/edward-boatner-biography/
Edward Boatner Biography by Randye Jones
"Edward Boatner (1898-1981)

Baritone, composer and educator Edward Hammond Boatner was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, on 13 November 1898. His father, Dr. Daniel Webster Boatner, was a former slave who became an itinerant minister. Edward Boatner was exposed at an early age to the music sung by African Americans in the churches where his father preached. He was particularly fascinated by the spirituals of the former slaves and began collecting them.

Boatner was educated in the public schools of St. Louis, Missouri, and Kansas City, Kansas. Most of his early musical education came from self-training. He applied for admission to the University of Missouri, but the young man’s race proved to be an unbreachable obstacle despite his acknowledged talent. He was entered Western University, Quindaro, Kansas, in 1916, where he studied voice and piano. Despite the strenuous objections of his father–who wanted Edward to become a minister–he gave recitals in the community. At one of these programs, he was heard by tenor Roland Hayes. Hayes encouraged Boatner to move to Boston and continue his studies there. Boatner’s father would not support the venture, so the young man had to work for two years to earn what little he could and make the journey on his own. Hayes helped him make contacts in the city, and Boatner was able to support himself by giving piano lessons. In 1918, Boatner recorded three of Harry T. Burleigh’s spiritual settings, including “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child,” for Broome Special Phonograph Records, a small African American-owned label based in Medford, Massachusetts. He continued his studies with faculty at the New England Conservatory, and he published the first of his spirituals setting, “Give Me Jesus,” in 1920.

The following year, Boatner received a one-year scholarship to attend the Boston Conservatory of Music, studying German, French and Italian vocal literature. He performed in concert at Hampton University, where he garnered the attention of R. Nathaniel Dett. Dett invited Boatner to tour with him across New England, and Dett became a mentor to the younger man. Boatner relocated to Chicago in 1925. He received his Bachelor’s degree from the Chicago College of Music seven years later. During this time, he served as a church choir director and continued to concertize. He also became director of music for the National Baptist Convention and published his Spirituals Triumphant, Old and New with Willa A. Townsend in 1927. In the foreword of the collection, the compilers explained that many past settings of spirituals had the
...Tendency to get away from the harmony and characteristic way in which the songs were originally sung, and therefore much of their real import is lost. To the end that the ‘old-time’ way of singing these songs may be preserved, is this edition brought forth.1


In the early 1930s, Boatner joined the faculty of two Texas historically Black colleges, Samuel Huston, Austin, and Wiley College in Marshall, where he was appointed their Dean of Music. He returned to New York in the latter half of the decade and opened his own vocal studio. Over his teaching career, Boatner’s students included opera singer George Shirley, entertainers Josephine Baker and Robert Guillaume, Blues songstress Libby Holman, and actor Clifton Webb. He continued to direct church and community choirs. He was a prolific writer of textbooks on music theory and pedagogy, non-fiction–especially on racial issues, short stories, and a novel, One Drop of Blood. Author Gisele Glover speculated that Boatner’s desire to write music books, especially those designed as self-help texts, was a “part of a response to his own difficulties in obtaining music instruction during his youth.”2

Boatner continued to publish settings of Negro spirituals for choir and vocal soloist. Of approximately 300 works credited to him, some of the best-known are “On Ma Journey” (1928), “Trampin'” (1931), “O What a Beautiful City” (1940), and “City Called Heaven” (1952). A number of these settings were published by his own company, Hammond Music. He published 30 Afro-American Choral Spirituals, a collection for mixed chorus in 1971 and The Story of the Spirituals: 30 Spirituals and Their Origins for voice and piano in 1973. In The Story of the Spirituals, the composer commented about the history of the music:
For many years after emancipation, blacks turned their backs on the slave-created spirituals. Perhaps it was too bitter a reminder of the past. Today there is more ready acceptance of this part of our musical heritage. We certainly should not forget that ragtime, jazz, blues, swing, gospel, rhythm, and rock and roll all have stemmed from the spiritual! Although there have been many Afro-American contributions to the forms, styles and trends of American music, the original and the most beautiful remains the spiritual.3

His compositions were regularly performed by many of his era’s top concert singers, such as Roland Hayes, Marian Anderson, Paul Robeson, Carol Brice, Ellabelle Davis, and Leontyne Price. Contemporary artists who have commercially recorded Boatner’s settings include Barbara Hendricks and Jessye Norman.

[...]

Edward Boatner continued teaching into his eighties. He died on 16 June 1981 in New York."

****
WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE ABOUT EDWARD BOATNER
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Boatner
"Biography
Boatner was educated at Western University in Quindaro, Kansas, Boston Conservatory and received a Bachelor of Music from the Chicago Music College (Now the College of Performing Arts at Roosevelt University). He also studied music privately. He began as a Concert singer with the encouragement and assistance of Roland Hayes — who performed many of Boatner's works on his concert programs—and choral director R. Nathaniel Dett. He also sang leading roles with the National Negro Opera Company. For the National Baptist Convention, he served as the director of music from 1925 to 1931. Boatner was a professor for Samuel Huston College (now Huston-Tillotson University) and Wiley College in Marshall, TX. He then settled in New York conducting a studio and directed community and church choirs. This allowed him to concentrate more on composing.

Boatner was the natural father of the great sax player Sonny Stitt, but the boy - named Edward Boatner, Jr. - was given up for adoption early on to the Stitt family, growing up in Saginaw, Michigan.

Music
Notable arrangements
Oh, What a Beautiful City
Le Us Break Bread Together
Soon I Will Be Done
Trampling
I want Jesus to walk with me
, for Marian Anderson

Notable compositions
Freedom Suite for chorus, narrator, and orchestra
The Man from Nazareth, a "spiritual musical"
Julius Sees Her, a musical comedy" "

****
ADDENDUM
I. Other online references to Edward Boatner
From http://www.worldcat.org/title/edward-boatner-papers-1941-1980/oclc/122607707
Edward Boatner papers, 1941-1980.
Author: Edward Boatner
Edition/Format: Archival material : English
Summary:
The Edward Boatner papers reflect his activities as composer, choral conductor, music professor and author of music textbooks. The music in the collection consists of scores for "Freedom Suite," his musical comedy "Julius Sees Her in Rome, Georgia," and his opera "Troubled in Mind." There are also scores for four gospel songs written by Boatner, and voice parts for selections from his musical play, "He Will Answer”

Subjects
Boatner, Edward, -- 1898-1981.

1 Edward Boatner and Willa A. Townsend, eds. Spirituals Triumphant Old and New. Nashville, TN: Sunday School Publishing Board, National Baptist Convention, 1927.

**
“Abstract:
The Edward Boatner papers reflect his activities as composer, choral conductor, music professor and author of music textbooks. The music in the collection consists of scores for "Freedom Suite," his musical comedy "Julius Sees Her in Rome, Georgia," and his opera "Troubled in Mind." There are also scores for four gospel songs written by Boatner, and voice parts for selections from his musical play, "He Will Answer."
The collection includes typescripts of Boatner's music instruction materials, plays, short stories, and other writings, including "The Damaging Results of Racism" and "Great Afro-Americans." Published reviews in the collection include those for performances of "Freedom Suite," and of the musical play, "The Man From Nazareth." A New York "Times" article focuses on Boatner's career, and his role in the regained popularity of the spiritual. A "Washington Post" article provides an interview with tenor Roland Hayes, one of Boatner's mentors.”

****
II. Comments from Mudcat Discussion Forum about the Song "Trampin"
From https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63703

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Tryin' to Make Heaven My Home
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 20 Oct 03 - 04:37 PM

"Many versions of "Poor Pilgrim." See thread 42490. Listed as "Tossed and Driven" in Randolph, a fine version as well.

"Trampin', Trampin'," is similar in some respects, and is sung mostly in black churches, while "Poor Pilgrim" is a white gospel song.

"Trampin'" is included in "Songs of Zion" as a spiritual, a traditional song with some copyrighted arrangements, which should be sung "slowly, with a firm beat," in the arrangement by J. Jefferson Cleveland and Verolga Nix (copyrighted 1981, Abingdon Press).

"Songs of Zion" (Abdingdon Press, 1981-1982) grew out of the "Consultation on the Black Church," held in 1973, where it was recommended that the Section on Worship develop a songbook from the Black religious tradition to be made available to United Methodist churches.

The version of "Trampin'" in "Songs of Zion" has the verse "I've never been to heaven but I been tol', dat de streets up dere am paved wid gol', as well as "If you git dere befo' I do, Tell all ma friends I'm coming too."
The editors insist that spirituals should be sung in dialect, and give instructions."
-snip-
Here's the link to the Mudcat discussion thread on the song "Poor Pilgrim": https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63779. That discussion thread includes an example that was "heard about 1895).

****
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Tryin' to Make Heaven My Home
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 22 Oct 03 - 05:27 PM

The "Songs of Zion" only has the two verses that I have indicated, plus the refrain. Never seen a long version in print, but I'm sure that any congregation would mix and match as needed."
-snip-
Pancocojams Editor's Note: These comments are quoted for informational purposes only, with particular focus on the fact that the song "Trampin" (given here as "Tryin' to Make Heaven My Home" wasn't included in any compilation of African American Spirituals until 1926 (or 1927).

For what it's worth, I was an active participant in that Mudcat forum for a period of time and, through that participation, was aware of and impressed with "Q" scholarship. For the record, "Q" was a White American who moved to Canada in his later years and demonstrated avid interest in African American folk music (including Spirituls). I thank Q (and some other "Mudcatters") for teaching me -through their examples- to be attentive to and document sources for information that I cite online and elsewhere.

That said, we didn't always agree and I'm not certain that the "Tryin to Make Heaven My Home" ("Trampin") song "goes back to white gospel of the 19th century). Also, I've not seen any documentation that "Poor Pilgrim" ("I am a poor pilgrim of sorrow/I'm tossed in this wide world alone"...) "is sung mostly in black churches, while "Poor Pilgrim" is a white gospel song."

Furthermore, I vehemently disagree with the position that African American Spirituals should be sung in (so-called) 19th century Negro dialect.

****
This concludes Part I of this three part series on the African American religious song "Trampin".

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

A Vice Sport Documentary Video Of The Bayou Classic Battle Of Marching Bands (Grambling State University vs Southern University) And Five YouTube Videos Of The 2017 Bayou Classic Battle Of Bands

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about Grambling State University's World Famed Tiger Marching Band and Southern University's Human Jukebox Marching Band and provides information about the Bayou Classic Battle between these HBCU (Historically Black Colleges & University) marching bands that are located in the state of Louisiana.

This post showcases a Vice Sport documentary video about both bands' preparation for the Bayou Classic as well as five YouTube videos of the 2017 Bayou Classic. Those five videos consists of each bands' entrances into the stadium and exits from the stadium, and each bands' field show (halftime show).

****
The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyright remains with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to all those who are affiliated with these universities and their marching bands. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT THE BAYOU CLASSIC
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayou_Classic
"The Bayou Classic is the annual college football game between the Grambling State University Tigers and the Southern University Jaguars, first held under that name in 1974 at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, although the series itself actually began in 1932. A trophy is awarded to the winning school.

Background
Since 1990 the game has been held the final Saturday in November (i.e., the Saturday after Thanksgiving) at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. Following the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, organizers moved the 2005 event from the Superdome to Reliant Stadium in Houston, Texas, where many of New Orleans' evacuees were living. This was the only time that the Bayou Classic was held outside of Louisiana. The 2006 Bayou Classic returned to the Superdome.

It is the best known annual game and rivalry in historically black college or university (HBCU) football and was nationally televised in the U.S. by NBC from 1991 to 2014. Since 2015 it has aired on the NBC Sports Network.[1] The Bayou Classic was the only National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Football Championship Subdivision game to be shown regularly on broadcast television. Fans have been known to refer to it as the "Black Super Bowl", although that name is not used in any official capacity by either school due to the National Football League's restrictions on the use of the "Super Bowl" name. Both schools typically forgo FCS playoff eligibility to participate in the Bayou Classic. The game is one of two black college football classics to be associated with Thanksgiving weekend; the other is the older Turkey Day Classic.
The game had State Farm Insurance as its title sponsor from 1996 to 2011.[2]

Other activities
Of the many festivities held in conjunction with the game, the most well-known and well-attended is the two-part Battle of the Bands, where both universities' marching bands—Grambling's "World Famed" Tiger Marching Band and Southern's Human Jukebox—perform. Following the Greek show, the two renowned bands stage elaborately choreographed performances on the Friday night before the game.

[...]

Impact
The Bayou Classic is a source of tourism revenue ($50 million) to the city of New Orleans and the state of Louisiana.[6] 250,000 visitors descend upon New Orleans over the course of the events leading up to the game, and the national television audience has attracted between four and five million viewers.[7] The success of the game has inspired the promotion of numerous other HBCU rivalries and "classics". In the past the stadium attendance had averaged between 50,000–70,000 annually. Hurricane Katrina brought some challenges, first with a one-year move to Houston, then with a slight drop-off in attendance upon the classic's return to New Orleans—all while the Florida Classic and Magic City Classic gained significantly in prominence over that same time period. Though the Bayou Classic also lost its title sponsor in 2011 and GSU faced numerous issues during its 2013 season, officials in 2014 rejected suggestions to remove GSU as a participant and instead resolved to quickly rejuvenate the classic.[8] Attendance has now climbed significantly each year since 2011 and is again near pre-Katrina levels.[9] The game also remains nationally televised, although NBC did move the game broadcast over to its sister sports-only network in 2015.

Series history
Historically, Grambling State and Southern have arguably had the two most successful football teams in the Southwestern Athletic Conference. Through the 2017 season Grambling has more SWAC football titles than any other school (25, not including their vacated 1975 title); Southern has the second most with 19. Grambling and SU also have more black national titles than any other SWAC schools; as of 2017 Grambling has the second most in the entire country with 15 total, while SU has the fourth most at the FCS-level (11)

Through 2017 Southern leads the overall series with Grambling, begun in 1932, by a 36–33 margin. Grambling leads the Bayou Classic era 23–21, after winning in 2017, and claims the longest winning streak in the all-time series, 9 games from 1970 to 1978 (including SU's 1972 forfeit). Southern claims the longest winning streak in the Bayou Classic era, 8 games from 1993–2000 (the Jaguars also had a previous 8-game winning streak at the start of the series, in the games played between 1932–46). Grambling's 43–6 victory in 1980 ranks as the largest margin of victory in the Bayou Classic, while SU's 1935 victory (64–6) is the largest margin in the all-time series.”….

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INFORMATION ABOUT THESE TWO HBCU MARCHING BANDS
(given in alphabetical order)

Grambling State University:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grambling_State_University
"Grambling State University (GSU) is a historically black, public, coeducational university, in Grambling, Louisiana. The university is home of the Eddie G. Robinson Museum and is listed on the Louisiana African American Heritage Trail. The university is a member-school of the University of Louisiana System and Thurgood Marshall College Fund.

[...]

GSU's [Grambling University's] World Famed Tiger Marching Band is a historic marching band with many special accolades and accomplishments. For instance, they are the only HBCU marching band in the nation to perform at two consecutive U.S. presidential inaugurations.[12] "World Famed" was founded in 1926 and serves as one of the premier ambassadors of the university. One of the band's most anticipated traditions is the annual nationally televised "Battle of The Bands" against Southern University's Human Jukebox marching band during Bayou Classic weekend in the Superdome. The yearly event attracts tens of thousands of alumni, fans, and spectators.[13]

"World Famed" is led by two drum majors and features a danceline from the university's Orchesis Dance Company."...

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Southern University:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_Jukebox
"The Human Jukebox is the internationally renowned marching band representing Southern University and A&M College located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Band profile
T. Leroy Davis is credited for establishing Southern University's marching band. Davis served as the band director between 1947 and 1964. He helped organize the first Southern University Band Festival and Band Day and was nationally known for his contributions and achievements in music. Davis was given the title of Professor Emeritus for his many years of service to the university in 1989.[1]

The band is anchored by the Isaac Greggs Band Hall on campus. Dr. Isaac Greggs (Doc) was an award-winning band director and alumnus of Southern University that led the band for 36 years (1969 - 2005). Under his leadership, the band grew in popularity and established a distinctive identity. In addition to having the band hall renamed in his honor, he was inducted into the Louisiana Black History Hall of Fame in 2013 and had a display case dedicated in his honor at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in 2016.[2][3]

The Human Jukebox has been consistently recognized as one of the best marching bands in the nation by USA Today, NCAA, ESPN, and Time.[4][5][6][7] The band is highly regarded for its powerful arrangements, extensive song catalog, and entertaining showmanship.

[...]

Since 1969, the Human Jukebox has been accompanied by The Fabulous Dancing Dolls. Gracie Perkins co-founded the Dolls with Dr. Greggs. The Dolls are best known for their stylish dance uniforms, beauty standards, and graceful dance style...

One of the most anticipated traditions of the Human Jukebox is the Friday night "Battle of the Bands" versus Grambling's "World Famed" Tiger Marching Band during Bayou Classic weekend in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. The annual event draws tens of thousands of alumni, fans, and spectators. Clips of it is aired on NBC's nationally televised broadcast of Saturday's football game. A YouTube video of the Human Jukebox's soulful rendition of Adele's hit single "Hello" from the 2015 Bayou Classic Battle of the Bands went viral which resulted in the band garnering overwhelmingly positive press both nationally and internationally citing their excellent performance. The video received over 1 million views in less than two weeks and was one of the nation's top trending topics on social media the week of its release.[13][14] In 2016, Vice Media released a documentary detailing the historical and cultural significance of the Human Jukebox and their annual band battle against Grambling's "World Famed" Tiger Marching band in New Orleans.[15]"...
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Click https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/march-joyous-raucous-beat-sonic-boom-south-180961436/ for historical information about Historical Black Colleges & Universities (HBCU) marching bands.

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Example #1: The Best Marching Bands on the Planet: VICE World of Sports



VICE Sports, Published on Dec 21, 2017

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Example #2: Southern University Human Jukebox "Marching In" Bayou Classic BOTB 2017



Human Jukebox Media, Published on Nov 24, 2017

Bayou Classic Battle of the Bands 2017

Human Jukebox Media Team 2017-2018: Garrett Edgerson(Media Director), Perry White, Chris Barber, Jamie Walker, Desmond Butler, Zachary Daigle, Derrick Espree

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Example #3 Southern Marching Out - 2017 Bayou Classic Game



ShowtimeWeb, Published on Nov 25, 2017

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Example #4: 2017 Bayou Classic Grambling State Marching Into the Superdome!



fact12, Published on Nov 25, 2017

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Example #5: Grambling Marching Out 270 - 2017 Bayou Classic Game



ShowtimeWeb, Published on Nov 25, 2017

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Example #6: Bayou Classic 2017 Halftime: Human Jukebox vs. World Famed Tigers Marching Band



HBCU Pulse, Published on Nov 25, 2017

During the 2017 Bayou Classic, both Grambling State University and Southern University got a chance to once again duke it out in a halftime battle of the bands. This time, it was televised on NBC Sports Network. Who do you think won this battle?
(VIDEO IS OWNED BY NBC UNIVERSAL!)

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