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Sunday, May 28, 2017

Africans' Childhood Memories Of Yvonne Chaka Chaka's song "Umqombothis"

Eddited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases South African singer Yvonne Chaka Chaka's late 1980s hit song "Umqombothi" ("African Beer").

Particular attention is given in this post to a sample of comments from African people about their childhood memories about Yvonne Chaka Chaka's record "Umquombothi". These comments reflect the unity that Africans have experienced and can experience as a result of recorded music from one African nation being popularized throughout the entire African continent and beyond.

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The content of this post is presented for cultural, recreational, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Yvonne Chaka Chaka for her musical legacy and social activism. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE SONG "UMQOMBOTHI"
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umqombothi_(song)
"Umqombothi" ("African Beer"; Xhosa pronunciation: [um̩k͡ǃomboːtʰi]) is a song famously performed by South African singer Yvonne Chaka Chaka. It was composed by Sello "Chicco" Twala and Attie van Wyk.

Umqombothi, in Xhosa, is a beer commonly found in South Africa made from maize, maize malt, sorghum malt, yeast and water.

Hotel Rwanda featured "Umqombothi" in the beginning of the film.

"Umqombothi"
Single by Yvonne Chaka Chaka
from the album Thank you Mr. DJ
Released 1988
Format Cassette, CD single
Recorded 1988
Writer(s) Sello "Chicco" Twala and Attie van Wyk"
-snip-
The South African song "Umqombothi" is in English and Xhosa languages.

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From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yvonne_Chaka_Chaka
"Yvonne Chaka Chaka (born Yvonne Machaka in 1965) is an internationally recognised and highly respected South African singer, songwriter, entrepreneur, humanitarian and teacher. Dubbed the "Princess of Africa" (a name she received after a 1990 tour), Chaka Chaka has been at the forefront of South African popular music for 27 years and has been popular in Zimbabwe, Kenya, Gabon, Sierra Leone and Ivory Coast.[3] Songs like "I'm Burning Up", "Thank You Mister DJ", "I Cry for Freedom", "Makoti", "Motherland" and the ever-popular "Umqombothi" ("African Beer") ensured Yvonne's stardom. The song "Umqombothi" was featured in the opening scene of the 2004 movie Hotel Rwanda.

As a young performer Yvonne was the first Black child[4] to appear on South African television in 1981. Since then, she has shared the stage with persons such as Bono, Angelique Kidjo, Annie Lennox, Youssou N’Dour, the classic rock band Queen and South Africans Johnny Clegg, Miriam Makeba and Hugh Masekela, to name a few...

Yvonne is a champion for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria, the United Nations MDG Envoy for Africa, and the Goodwill Ambassador for the Roll Back Malaria Partnership. She was chosen by Nelson Mandela as the first ambassador for his children's fund, and has also established her own charity, the Princess of Africa Foundation, using the name first given to her in Uganda. The Princess of Africa Foundation is a partner of the ACTION global health advocacy partnership."...

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SHOWCASE VIDEO: Yvonne Chaka Chaka - Umqombothi - Original copy off Master Tape - High Quality (HQ) SD



1ought2, Published on Jun 1, 2012

This was Yvonnes big hit that really introduced her to Africa. Bigger than 'I'm In Love With A DJ' and went viral Afica wide. The video was shot in October 1986 in varios locations in Johannesburg and out at Heia Safari Ranch near Muldersdrift. Filmed on 16mm Arri. DOP Roy MacGregor, styled by Leigh vd Merwe, produced by Pierre Hinch for S&H Films. Record co is Dephon, Phil Hollis. The video was Written, edited and directed by a young Makhlari. The aim was to put sneak in some social commentary desguised as celebration. It was the apartheid era afterall and little dissent could be shown on TV.

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LYRICS: UMQOMBOTHI
(composed by Sello "Chicco" Twala and Attie van Wyk)

Verse
I work hard every day
To make my beer
(Umqombothi)
Wake up early every morning
To please my people with African beer
(Umqombothi)
I make sure the fire burns
To make my beer
(Umqombothi)
My special beer Umqombothi
(Umqombothi)
Is African beer

Chorus
We MaDlamini (Everybody)
Uph'umqombothi (Come and drink my)
We MaDlamini (magic beer)
Uph'umqombothi

Verse
I work hard to make them happy
Every weekend (Umqombothi)
Makes them party to the rhythm
Makes them dance, this magic beer (Umqobothi)
I wanna make you happy (Umqobothi)
I wanna make you smile (Umqobothi)
I wanna make you dance (Umqobothi), dance
I'll make sure there's a party
Where they drink my special beer
Umqombothi is magic beer
Umqombothi is African beer

Chorus 3x
We MaDlamini (Everybody)
Uph'umqombothi (nawu)
We MaDlamini Uph'umqombothi (nawu madoda)
Wozani ka MaDlamini
Wozani ngithi wozani
Wozani ka MaDlamini
Come on I wanna make you happy
I wanna make you smile lets boogie together
Umqombothi (Umqombothi)
I work hard every day
To please my people with African beer

posted by Ganiu Aladeola, 2016 in the discussion thread for https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z07zZeeRZ-o [the video that is embedded in this post]

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COMMENTS ABOUT THE SOCIAL ACTIVISM MEANINGS OF THE SONG "UMQOMBOTHI"
From https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z07zZeeRZ-o

kigozi muhammad, 2016
"for those who didn't this was a historical song. i don't know some of the non-English words they are saying but all i know it was a song of defiance by Africans from buying white industrialized liquor. so most Africans viced means to make local beer . so that's the foundation of this beautiful song

Reply
Mrsuperafrosamurai, 2016
"+kigozi muhammad Umqombothi is a traditional beer, also used after the circumcision ritual to become a man. isiXhosa and amaZulu (maybe all Ndebele) drink it. It was being made a long long time before Europeans came to Africa."

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lubo yot, 2016
"This song encapsulates African way of life . It has deep meanings beyond what you see on the surface."

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COMMENTS FROM AFRICANS ABOUT THEIR MEMORIES OF YVONNE CHAKA CHAKA'S SONG "UMQOMBOTHI"
These comments from the discussion thread of this showcased video are only a sample of the comments from people throughout Africa about their memories of Yvonne Chaka Chaka's song "Umqombothi". A few other comments besides Africans also recalled their childhood memories of this song. There are also other comments in that discussion thread, including comments about Yvonne Chaka Chaka's musical career and her positive social activism roles.

These selected comments are presented in chronological order with the oldest comments given first. Numbers have been assigned to these comments for referencing purposes only.

2013
1. jes yoncy
"i luv ds song so mch...it remnds me of my childhood back in TANZANIA...LUV U YVONNE"

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2. TheIwittness
"Like if you're Kenyan and always sang this as "Yesu Mkobozi" as a kid! I did!!!!"
-snip-
"Yesu Mkobozi" is Swahili for "Jesus Deliver" - the implication is that the Kenyan commenter misunderstood the words of this song.

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3. Jazzy Jay
"Omgg my family play this songs at every celebrations.. Love it #liberian"

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2015
4. badex Inc
"This song was huge in Nigeria! i remember growing up to this. Nostalgia brought me to this page. yvonne chaka chaka is an adorable woman with a great voice!"

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2016
5. David Kialain, Jr.
"This is the jam of the 80's. I grew up in listening to this tune in Liberia on all the radio stations back then."

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6. Herve-greg Kabonte
"I'm from DR Congo; this song remember me my childhood.
Even if we were not able to understand the language, the music was so nice that we liked it too much.
Thanks for posting that!"

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Reply
7. Blanchard Mwanza
"+Herve-greg Kabonte Wow I'm also from DR congo I also didn't know the language but we danced to it as kids"

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Reply
8. Josiane Mudahemuka
"I'm from Burundi and I feel the same way as you.I was like 5 or 6 when they used to play it and everyone who was named Yvonne would call herself Chaka Chaka...thenn she came to Burundi for a concert late 2000's.I knew most of her songs.She is amazing.Someone removed Makoti from Youtube and I'm not happy about it.I loved the song and now that I can understand it I love it more."

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Reply
9. Azam Jimma
"I'm from Oromia, Ethiopia have same like you guys ..wasn't understood but love it like crazy"

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10. Sherbet_Bomb
"Australian born but I'm of Zimbabwean descent from my mothers side. I used to hear this song alot as a kid. Thought I don't drink, I find this song delightful."

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11. Wendy Lovejoy
"This reminds me of growing up in South Africa and how all the relatives and friends came over for Zulu beer and fun. The good old days!."...

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12. Mamadu Sall
"Thank you! I like this son I remember when I was 7 years old in Sierra Leone, this son[g] was popular everywhere you pass he's playing. Welcome south Africa ©®¢$@&"

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13. moy topo
"i'm from Ethiopia; this song remember me my childhood when i was in Kenya.
Even though if i was not able to understand the language, the music was so nice that we liked it too much."

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14. Corona Cermak
"God, this is still soooooo good song. I will forever listen to it. In Tanzania street I danced this song anywhere I heard it when I was a kid. And today it still makes me smile, jump and dance with so much love. Thanks for posting it. Soo Much love"

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15. accraboi1
"ow. I remember hearing this song in Ghana as kid back in the 90's wow. I finally find it."

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16. Jabulani Dube
"Danced to this song for decades, with not even an idea of what the words mean! That was when Zimbabwe was still a country!"

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17. brice seho
"ooooooohhhhh!!!!!!! my childhood in Cotonou/Benin/west africa"

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Reply
18. Zainabu Shoko
"my childhood too - Kenya! she was all over Africa! love it..."

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Reply
19. Sandra Godwin, 2017
"Same thing in tanzania"

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20. Miriam Sang
"Childhood memories of us in kenya watching and re-watching her d.v.d...those were the days...just LIT!"
-snip-
"Lit" here is an African American originated vernacular term meaning something "hot" i.e. great.

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21. amor Oiradh
"I`m from Mozambique, i love this song, this song rebember me my childhood!!!!"

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22. Jennifer Mbah
"I'm from Cameroon and I used to love this song when i was younger. I'm so happy I found it !!"

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2017
23. Tchekouille N.E.A
"I'm Cameroonian, i live in France but this song it's all my childhood...
Yvonne Chaka Chaka!!!"

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24. Mawolo Mulbah
"This song is a true spirit of Africa as a whole. Each time I listen to it it reminds me about my childhood days growing up in Liberia. I Looovveee iiiittttt!👌"

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25. Ugonna Etoh
"I can"t forget those olden days my grand father always plays this lovely song with his gramma fone along side his kegs of palm wine.. ww beautiful song from Yvonne...."

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26. Kingfloss jiggles
"From Nigeria, born in 1994 but this song was still a staple of My childhood.
One love brothers and sisters, no matter what language and culture, we are all one.
Viva Africa"

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27. Prince Wako
"March.2017 still watching. Im Norwegian of African decency (East Africa Uganda). Old African Music is great. I love love love this Song #ChildhoodMemories. It gives me peace of mind thinking of the good times with family. Yvonne Chaka Chaka was really a great musician"

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28. Michelle Udo
"i would always listen to this when i was little and i thought it said "everybody come and see my african queen" and thats what i looked up because i didn't know who made the song. now i know why my mom was always laughing when we would sing this."

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