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Sunday, February 12, 2017

Comments About Old School Gospel Music & Two Examples Of The Song "I Will Trust in The Lord"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents comments about "old school Gospel music" with special focus on old school African American Gospel music and the differences between traditional "old school" Black Gospel", contemporary Black Gospel, and Praise & Worship music.

This post also showcases two videos of the old school Black Gospel song "I Will Trust In The Lord". Selected comments from those videos' discussion threads.

The content of this post is presented for religious, historical, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the composer of "I Will Trust In The Lord". Thanks also to all those who are featured in the videos that are embedded in this post. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.
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Some websites* credit Rev. C. L. Franklin as the composer of "I Will Trust In The Lord". However, I'm not sure if Rev. Franklin was the composer of this song or just was known early on for singing that song.

Click https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C._L._Franklin for information about the American Baptist minister and father of singer Aretha Franklin, Rev. C. L. Franklin.
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* For example, the lyric website whose link is given below credits Rev. C. L. Franklin as the composer of this song. I've also seen this song given as a Spiritual. If so, its composers are unknown.

Also, click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/02/two-renditions-of-contemporary-black.html for the companion pancocojams post "Two Renditions Of The Contemporary Black Gospel Song "Something About the Name Jesus".

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SOME DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TRADITIONAL BLACK GOSPEL MUSIC, CONTEMPORARY BLACK GOSPEL MUSIC , AND PRAISE & WORSHIP MUSIC
In the context of this post, "old school" is a positive African American Vernacular English referent for Gospel music from the past. "Old school" is traditional, original, down home (rooted in the South) forms of Black Gospel music.

Another way of saying "old school" is something that was done (or someone who did something) "back in the day". And "back in the day" can mean as late as the mid twentieth to late twentieth century or even later.

"Dr. Watts" (lining out; Old Meter)* is one type of religious singing that can be described as "old school". However, "old school" church singing can also refer to specific song titles and how those songs are sung. When Gospel songs are sung soulfully, in "down home" ways, the choir or soloists are exhorted to "Sing!" and are said to be "sangin'".

"Old school Black Gospel music may differ from some contemporary Black Gospel music in the singing styles if not their themes. Among other things, Black Gospel music and Praise & Worship singing differ in their themes, singing styles, and the structure of the vocalists who sing those songs (i.e. Gospel choirs or Gospel quartets vs a small number of singers referred to as "Praise Teams").

Here are descriptions of and comments about Black Gospel music and Praise & Worship music that I found online:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traditional_black_gospel
Original music (1920s – 1940s)
"What most African Americans would identify today as "gospel" began in the early 20th century. The gospel music that Thomas A. Dorsey, Sallie Martin, Willie Mae Ford Smith and other pioneers popularized had its roots in the blues as well as in the more freewheeling forms of religious devotion of "Sanctified" or "Holiness" churches — sometimes called "holy rollers" by other denominations — who encouraged individual church members to "testify," speaking or singing spontaneously about their faith and experience of the Holy Ghost and "Getting Happy," sometimes while dancing in celebration. In the 1920s Sanctified artists, such as Arizona Dranes, many of whom were also traveling preachers, started making records in a style that melded traditional religious themes with barrelhouse, blues and boogie-woogie techniques and brought jazz instruments, such as drums and horns, into the church.

Thomas Dorsey stretched the boundaries in his day to create great gospel music, choirs, and quartets. Talented vocalists have been singing these songs far beyond Dorsey's expectations. The method, dynamics and power behind the songs are different, but God's message is delivered each and every time."...

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From http://www.gainesville.com/news/20060202/what-is-the-difference-between-traditional-and-contemporary-gospel What is the difference between traditional and contemporary gospel?
by Elder Karl Anderson, Feb 2, 2006
...."There are people who like traditional and there are those who prefer contemporary. One may ask, what is traditional and contemporary gospel?

Although the music industry has established the two as separate categories, both types are gospel and serve the same purpose. The difference between traditional gospel and contemporary gospel are the melodic and rhythmic styles of the music.

Traditional gospel is basically gospel music that carries the musical style of the past. It tends to maintain a basic churchy rhythmic pattern without any compromise.

There are several sub-types of traditional gospel: standard traditional, traditional quartet, traditional choir, classic hymns and traditional a cappella music...

And like traditional gospel, there are many sub-types of contemporary gospel: standard contemporary, R&B, Holy Hip Hop, contemporary quartet, contemporary choir, contemporary a cappella, techno, house, reggae, salsa and dance hall."..

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From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contemporary_worship_music
"Contemporary worship music (CWM), also known as praise and worship music,[1] is a loosely defined genre of Christian music used in contemporary worship. It has developed over the past sixty years and is stylistically similar to pop music. The songs are frequently referred to as "praise songs" or "worship songs" and are typically led by a "worship band" or "praise team", with either a guitarist or pianist leading. It is becoming a common genre of music sung in Western churches, particularly in Pentecostal churches. Many non-charismatic Protestant churches use this type of music."...

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From https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-praise-and-worship-music-and-gospel-music "What is the difference between praise and worship music and gospel music?" comment written by Angela Witcher, Bachelor of Music, Master of Arts in Music, Music Teacher and Professor
on Jun 2, 2016
...."Praise and worship and gospel music are similar in their message of Christianity. They both can focus on praising God’s name, His work, telling the person’s testimony, or stories from the Bible. They can both have any tempo, or texture. They can have any instrumentation of combination of vocals. The main thing is that they worship God and spread the message of Christianity in a general sense.

They are different primarily in the church culture in which they are used. For years, I went to a primarily African-American church, and their main form of worship was gospel music. The music utilized a full choir, a live band with keyboards, drums, bass and guitars. The music varied in tempo but often got faster in time and had a call and response element from soloist(s) and the choir. This musical style is best compared to rhythm and blues. There was often key changes by half-steps upward to build excitement as the music went on. There was also heavy participation from the congregation. I performed in the band and sometimes the choir, and when we toured various locations and saw other churches they also performed in a similar manner....

I was raised in a church (primarily Caucasian) who did, “Southern Gospel Music,” meaning a style similar to country music from the 50’s and 60’s in the USA. The music often had personal testimonies and were done with either CD accompaniment, or a guitar player. Sometimes the songs were traditional baptist hymns (known in both Caucasian and African-American southern churches) sung as solo songs in a country style. Sometimes a whole choir sang songs from the hymnal straight out or in a country style. It is called “Gospel,” because that is a word that means “good news.” Both of Gospel and Southern Gospel are called “Gospel,” and rightly so, but they are not the exact same style. I knew it depended on the culture of the church I was going to, as to what I was going to hear.

The final type of music is praise and worship. I went to a Christian university and was introduced to praise and worship music there as I attended church services and convocation 3–7 times per week. For praise and worship in this setting, the music is often in the style of pop or rock music. There is a live band with guitars, bass, and occasionally a piano player. Sometimes praise and worship meant 4 and 5 part harmony singers doing pop or upbeat country style medleys of existing hymns or new songs. I often felt that praise and worship set the tone for church service."..
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This is just one of several responses on that site to the question about the difference between Praise & Worship and Gospel music.

*Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/08/soulful-black-churches.html for one of several pancocojams posts on African American churches singing "Dr. Watts" songs.

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LYRICS -I WILL TRUST IN THE LORD
(composer?, earliest date of composition?)

I will trust in the Lord.
I will trust in the Lord.
I will trust in the Lord until I die
I will trust in the Lord.
I will trust in the Lord.
I will trust in the Lord until I die.

I'm goin' to treat everybody right.
I'm goin' to treat everybody right.
I'm goin' to treat everybody right until I die
I'm goin' to treat everybody right.
I'm goin' to treat everybody right.
I'm goin' to treat everybody right until I die.

I'm goin' to stay on the battlefield.
I'm goin' to stay on the battlefield.
I'm goin' to stay on the battlefield until I die
I'm goin' to stay on the battlefield.
I'm goin' to stay on the battlefield.
I'm goin' to stay on the battlefield until I die.

I'm goin' to stay on a bended knee.
I'm goin' to stay on a bended knee.
I'm goin' to stay on a bended knee until I die
I'm goin' to stay on a bended knee.
I'm goin' to stay on a bended knee.
I'm goin' to stay on a bended knee until I die.

I'm goin' to watch, fight and pray.
I'm goin' to watch, fight and pray.
I'm goin' to watch, fight and pray until I die
I'm goin' to watch, fight and pray.
I'm goin' to watch, fight and pray.
I'm goin' to watch, fight and pray until I die.


From http://lyrics.wikia.com/wiki/Rev._C.L._Franklin:I_Will_Trust_In_The_Lord
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As is the case with Spirituals, this song has not set lyrics except for the first verse. Like Spirituals, this song is open ended (meaning it can continue for as long as the singers wish it to. Other verses are sung in a zipper* fashion (in addition or in substitution for the words given above after "I'm goin' to"). And previously sung verses can be repeated.

*zipper songs- a word or phrase is zipped out of the lyrics and another word or phrase is put in its place

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Example #1: Singing - I will trust in the Lord


Dr. E. Dewey Smith Jr, Uploaded on Feb 15, 2010

Sermon Title: "As for me and my house"
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Here's information about Dr. E. Dewey Smith Jr: from http://edeweysmith.org/bio/
"Dr. E. Dewey Smith is the Senior Pastor/Teacher of The House of Hope Atlanta and The House of Hope Macon in Georgia – one church in two locations – with a membership roll of more than 15,000....

“The Preachers” is Smith’s latest foray into television. He is the recipient of 2015 “Programmer of the Year” Allen Award, received for his television program, “Living Hope.” The show is broadcast weekly on The Word Network which has a reach – in the United States alone – of 86 million households. His television broadcasts and media ministries have an international reach and are viewed by millions around the world."..
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Here are selected comments from this video's discussion thread. Numbers are assigned to these comments for referencing purposes only.
2010
1. tighmir
"I love a young church that does it the old way! Love it!"

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2. anglu9
"This is the foundation of church traditional Gospel.From a truly anointed Pastor.THANK YOU LORD"

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3. MontageMediaWorks
"Up getting ready for class...man this reminds me of those old MBC days with my Gramz...with the choir marching in and all that lol"
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"MBC" is probably "Macedonia Baptist Church" or "Monumental Baptist Church". There are churches with those names in Black communities throughout the United States.

"Gramz" is a stylized form of the word "Grams" (i.e. "grandma").

"Choir marching in" - choir processionals. Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/11/marching-for-jesus-black-church_84.html for one of several pancocojams posts on choir processionals.

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2011
{The following two comments appear to be in response to the question; "What denomination is Dr. E. Dewey Smith Jr's church? But that question is no longer found on that discussion thread.]
4. Anto18nio
"@travonprince this is a Baptist church."

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Reply
5. baltimoresshorty
"@travonprince It is a full gospel church somewhat of a mix of Baptist and Cogic is the easiest way for me to explain it"
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COGIC= Church Of God In Christ (denomination)

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Elder Vincent Brown
6. "I so wish church could sound like it use to. This is great."

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7. martyca6
"His songs brings me back memories when I was a child on Sunday mornings. Don't really hear much of these songs any more."

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8. mones673
"This is old-time church RIGHT HERE. Yessir! Sing, Pastor Smith."

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9. LadyCiss
"yes! this is my FAVORITE Pastor Smith/GTR video right here. That drummer is on point, reminds me of AME church days when the spirit was high and the Pastor would open the doors of the church."
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AME = African Methodist Episcopal (denomination)
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"Opening the doors of the church" occurs at the end of the sermon when the minister offers a formal invitation for people to profess Jesus as their Lord & Savior and join the church (or if they are already "saved", offers a formal invitation for people to join that particular church).

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2012
10. PsalmsPoetic
"Okay, if you're reading this and you attend this church, tell your pastor I said to sing more, don't be cutting it short, I'm trying to get my praise on... lol. Blessings to you and your anointed pastor."... 

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11. Angel Hall
"We are on the SAME page and in the SAME book when it comes down to old school gospel. I thank Rev. Smith for keeping it around."

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12. MrOverdogg
"Old school, nothing like it.."

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13. Daryll Brown
"Bringing it back the old school way! I remember this song being sung at devotion or invitation(when the doors of the church opened)."

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2013
13. Jason A Howell, Jr
"That's real olde school"

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Example #2: I Will Trust In The Lord



Stamps Media & Entertainment, Uploaded on Jan 1, 2010
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Here are selected comments from this video's discussion thread. Numbers are assigned to these comments for referencing purposes only.
2010
1. albert adams
"This is one of my favorite gospel songs, I just love it. Thanks for posting this. They don't sing songs like this to much anymore."

2013
Reply
2. Patricia Boughton
"They don't and it's a shame".

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3. Terence Manuel
"This is an old time favorite. I grew up in rural Georgia. I can still remember the floor of the church vibrating as well all stomped and swayed. Sister Finney on that piano."

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2016
4. MCKILDRED ROSS
"Churches don't sing like this anymore".

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5. Rox Smith
"One of my favorite hymns. I will trust in the Lord...... old school....love it!!!"

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6. Hamylton Porter
"That's some real Church singing! !!!! They don't do it like that much anymore. That real touch the soul!!! AMEN!"

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