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Wednesday, May 18, 2016

"Moussolou" - by Malian Singers Salif Keita & Oumou Sangare (with lyrics)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases two examples of the song "Moussolou" (Malian word for "women"*) by Malian singer Salif Keita and by Malian singer Oumou Sangare. Information about Salif Keita and Oumou Sangare is included in this post. The lyrics to this song in French and in English are also included in this post along with selected comments from these examples' YouTube discussion threads.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights are included in this post.

Thanks to Salif Keita and Oumou Sangare for their musical legacy. Thanks also to all those who are included in this post. Special thanks to commenter Samuel Jacob for sharing the lyrics to this song. Thanks also to the publishers of these examples in YouTube.

I'm not sure whether Oumou Sangare or Salif Keita wrote this song or even if these Malian songs entitle Moussoolou are the same. More information about this song will be greatly appreciated.

* In a 1997 interview Oumou Sangara indicated that "OS When our parents settled is Wassoulou, close to where they speak Malinke, we lost our native Peul language. They wanted to speak Malinke. Now, the language of Wassoulou is a mix of both—Bambara and Wassoulounké. It’s in this language that I sing." http://bombmagazine.org/article/2031/oumou-sangare Oumou Sangare by Zoë AngleseyBOMB 58, Winter 1997

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INFORMATION ABOUT SALIF KEITA
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salif_Keita
"Salif Keïta (born August 25, 1949) is an afro-pop singer-songwriter from Mali. He is unique not only because of his reputation as the "Golden Voice of Africa" but because he has albinism...

Keita was born in the village of Djoliba.[1] He was cast out by his family and ostracized by the community because of his albinism, a sign of bad luck in Mandinka culture.[2] He left Djoliba for Bamako in 1967, where he joined the government sponsored Super Rail Band de Bamako. In 1973 Keita joined the group, Les Ambassadeurs. Keita and Les Ambassadeurs fled political unrest in Mali during the mid-1970s for Abidjan, Ivory Coast, and subsequently changed the group's name to "Les Ambassadeurs Internationaux". The reputation of Les Ambassadeurs Internationaux rose to the international level in the 1970s, and in 1977 Keita received a National Order award from the president of Guinea, Sékou Touré....

Career
Keita moved to Paris in 1984 to reach a larger audience. His music combines traditional West African music styles with influences from both Europe and the Americas. Musical instruments that are commonly featured in Keita's work include balafons, djembes, guitars, koras, organs, saxophones, and synthesizers....

Keita found success in Europe as one of the African stars of world music...

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INFORMATION ABOUT OUMOU SANGARE
From http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/Oumou_Sangare.aspx
"Oumou Sangare is the voice of feminism in West Africa. In a region where polygamy is the norm, and women are often viewed as the property of their husbands, Sangare’s music has come to symbolize the struggle against gender imbalance. In addition to their social content, Sangare’s songs are full of the joy and spirit that the traditional rhythms of Mali have been communicating for generations. Over the last few years, Sangare has become one of Africa’s biggest pop stars, as well as a major force in the European and American world music scenes.

Sangare was born in Bamako, the capital of Mali, in 1968. Her parents had migrated to the city from the rural Wassoulou region south of the Niger River. Her mother, Aminata Diakhite, was also a talented singer, and she encouraged her daughter to follow in her footsteps. Sangare made her public performing debut at the age of six, singing for a huge crowd at Bamako’s main sports arena, the Stade des Omnisports. Before the show began, her mother counseled her, according to her Nonesuch Records bio, to “sing like you’re at home in the kitchen.”

Wassoulou Sound
Since Mali gained its independence in the early 1960s, the Wassoulou region has produced a steady flow of wonderful female vocalists. These singers—a group that has included Coumba Sidibe, Sali Sidibe, and Flan Saran—collectively influenced the creation of a musical style based on the region’s traditional dances and rhythms. Those rhythms, combined with local instruments such as the djembe drum and the kamalengoni—a harp-like instrument invented by local youths during this period— eventually gave rise to a new popular musical style called wassoulou, named after the region in which it originated. The wassoulou style communicates a sense of youthful rebellion and freedom.

Her mother’s advice apparently paid off, for Sangare’s talent soon earned her membership in The National Ensemble of Mali, which serves as a training ground for the best musicians in that country. In 1986 Sangare was invited by Bamba Dambele, known for his work with the African pop ensemble Super Djata Band, to tour Europe with his traditional percussion troupe Djobila. The European tour opened Sangare’s eyes to the possibility of an international career of her own. Upon her return to Mali, she immediately went to work forming her own band and developing a songwriting style and sound that effectively blended Wassoulou tradition with a modern pop sensibility.

made first recording, Moussolou, 1989; Moussolou released internationally, 1991; …

Awards : European World Music Album of the Year, for Ko Sira, 1993."

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FEATURED EXAMPLES
These examples are given in chronological order based on their publishing date on YouTube with the oldest dated example given first.
Example #1: Mali - Salif Keita – Moussoolou



AfricaNDC, Uploaded on Nov 1, 2008
-snip-
Lyrics given in this video's discussion thread:
samuel Jacob, 2015

Bonjour, Mon ami Aguibou Oumar Traoré et moi même vous proposons une traduction de cette chanson. Bien sûr, c'est une interprétation à partir du sens littéral.

Cette chanson est dédiée aux femmes et particulièrement aux mamans, dévouées à leurs familles.
L’auteur Salif Keita chante le mérite des femmes, qui ne ménagent aucun effort pour le bien-être de leur foyer. Elles accomplissent volontairement des taches ardues et cela avec cœur, courage et humilité.

Choristes :
Nos reconnaissances aux grandes personnalités,
Nos reconnaissances aux habitants du pays,
Et nos grandes reconnaissances aux femmes.
Nos reconnaissances aux grandes personnalités,
Nos reconnaissances aux habitants du pays,
Et nos grandes reconnaissances aux femmes.

Quand on y pense, on voit que les femmes sont fatiguées,
Ah les femmes sont épuisées,
Oh les ménagères !
Quand on y pense, on voit que les femmes sont fatiguées,
Ah les femmes sont épuisées,
Oh les ménagères !

Au lieu de te vanter d’être riche, rappelle-toi que tu es issu de quelque chose,
Oh quelle bonne chose (Sabou) !
Avant que tu ne sois très riche, tu es née d’une femme,
Oh maman, Oh maman !
( Inako Sagodona ?...)
Oh mères-ménagères.

Ne te vante pas d’être riche, rappelle-toi que tu es issu de quelque chose
Oh quelle bonne chose (Sabou) !
Avant que tu ne sois très riche, tu es née d’une femme,
Oh maman, Oh maman !
( Inako Sagodona ?...)
(Ena niomabo ?...)

Vous les femmes, votre travail est juste,
Dans votre sagesse,
Vous les femmes qui respectez vos époux,
Dès que le chef de famille rentre du champ, la marmite d’eau est déjà bouillante,
Après son bain, il trouvera la table mise (diner).

Elles vont dans la brousse pour chercher du bois, trouvent des moyens de subsistance,
Et avec les revenus, elles font bouillir la marmite, achètent des vêtements et font tourner la maison,

Et cela encore et toujours, (Avec joie, dévouement et humilité)
Choristes : Oh maman qui fait plaisir aux enfants,
Et cela encore et toujours,
Choristes : Oh maman qui fait plaisir aux enfants.

Choristes :
Quand je pense à ma mère et aux femmes, j’en déduis qu’on est tous issu des femmes.
Quand je pense à ma mère et aux femmes, j’en déduis qu’on est tous issu des femmes.
Oh mère adorée !
Quand je pense à ma mère et aux femmes, j’en déduis qu’on est tous issu des femmes.
Quand je pense à ma mère et aux femmes, j’en déduis qu’on est tous issu des femmes.
Oh mère adorée !

Mabassira (Prénom), l’Homme doit vraiment remercier sa mère,
Celle qui lui fait plaisir, celle qui depuis son enfance nettoie ses couches,
Celle qui a veillé sur lui durant sa croissance, Celle qui a rendu sa vie comme il l'a souhaite,
Et aujourd’hui, il est devenu une personnalité (célébrité).
Oh les ménagères !

Mabassira (Prénom), l’Homme doit vraiment remercier sa mère,
Celle qui lui fait plaisir, celle qui depuis son enfance nettoie ses couches,
Celle qui a veillé sur lui durant sa croissance, Celle qui a rendu sa vie comme il l'a souhaite,
Et aujourd’hui, il est devenu une personnalité (célébrité).
Oh les ménagères !

Elle est de retour, Maba, la ménagère est de retour,
Avant que tu ne deviennes riche, tu es issu d’une femme,
Choristes : Ah c’est bien vrai ! Les femmes sont le fondement de tout.
Avant que tu ne deviennes une grande personnalité, tu es issu d’une femme,
Choristes : Ah c’est bien vrai ! Les femmes sont le fondement de tout.

Elle est de retour, Maba, la ménagère est de retour,
Choristes : Han Mabassira, celle qui fait plaisir aux enfants.
Enfant issu de Silmoulé, Maba est de retour
Choristes : Han Mabassira, celle qui fait plaisir aux enfants.
L’enfant issu de Silmoulé, Maba est de retour
Choristes : Han Mabassira, celle qui fait plaisir aux enfants.

Oh femmes, Oh femmes, Oh femmes.


Silmaoulé (Prénom et ascendant de Mabassira)
-snip-
Google translate from French to English
Hello, My friend Aguibou Oumar Traoré and I even offer a translation of this song. Of course, this is an interpretation from the literal sense.

This song is dedicated to women and particularly mothers, devoted to their families.
The writer Salif Keita sings of women merit, which every effort for the welfare of their homes. They willingly perform difficult tasks and that too with heart, courage and humility.

Choristes:
Our recognition to the great personalities,
Our acknowledgments to the inhabitants of the country,
And our great recognition to women.
Our recognition to the great personalities,
Our acknowledgments to the inhabitants of the country,
And our great recognition to women.

When you think about it, we see that women are tired,
Ah, women are exhausted,
Oh housewives!
When you think about it, we see that women are tired,
Ah, women are exhausted,
Oh housewives!

Instead boast of being rich, remember that you're coming from something,
Oh what a good thing (Sabu)!
Before you be rich, you were born of a woman,
Oh Mom, oh Mom!
(Inako Sagodona? ...)
Oh parent household.

Boast not thyself to be rich, remember that you're coming from something
Oh what a good thing (Sabu)!
Before you be rich, you were born of a woman,
Oh Mom, oh Mom!
(Inako Sagodona? ...)
(Ena niomabo? ...)

You women, your job is just,
In your wisdom,
You women who respect your husband,
As soon as the family head home from the field, the water pot is already boiling,
After his bath, he will find the setting (dinner) table.

They go into the bush to collect firewood, finding livelihoods,
And income, they boil the pot, buy clothes and rotate home,

And this again and again (with joy, dedication and humility)
Choristes: Oh mom makes the children happy,
And this again and again,
Choristes: Oh Mom makes children happy.

Choristes:
When I think of my mother and the women, I conclude that we are all born of women.
When I think of my mother and the women, I conclude that we are all born of women.
Oh beloved mother!
When I think of my mother and the women, I conclude that we are all born of women.
When I think of my mother and the women, I conclude that we are all born of women.
Oh beloved mother!

Mabassira (First Name) Man must really thank her mother,
One that makes her happy, which since childhood cleans its layers,
She who watched over him during his growth, one that made his life as he wishes,
And today he has become a personality (celebrity).
Oh housewives!

Mabassira (First Name) Man must really thank her mother,
One that makes her happy, which since childhood cleans its layers,
She who watched over him during his growth, one that made his life as he wishes,
And today he has become a personality (celebrity).
Oh housewives!

She's back, Maba, the housewife is back,
Before you become not rich, you're from a woman,
Choristes: Oh it's true! Women are the foundation of everything.
Before thou become a great personality, you're from a woman,
Choristes: Oh it's true! Women are the foundation of everything.

She's back, Maba, the housewife is back,
Choristes: Han Mabassira, one that children enjoy.
Child of Silmoulé, Maba is back
Choristes: Han Mabassira, one that children enjoy.
The child of Silmoulé, Maba is back
Choristes: Han Mabassira, one that children enjoy.

Oh, women, women Oh, oh women.


Silmaoulé (First ascendancy Mabassira)

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Example #2: Oumou Sangare ~ Moussolou



groovemonzter, Uploaded on Feb 15, 2009

song: Moussolou
artist: Oumou Sangare
album: Moussolou
year: 1989
-snip-
selected comments from this sound file's discussion thread
Julius Kariuki, 2015
"Heavenly!!!! Pure magic, even though I know not the language. Can someone out there post an English translation?"

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Reply
busquets da silva, 2016
"she talks about woman (moussolou in malian language) and wedding(fourou)"

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Reply
Yankuba Ousman Camara, 2016
"The text is our the Malian women, talking about the importance of marriage, the African women in general, attaching of marriage."

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