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Monday, September 16, 2013

Shabba Ranks - Tinga linga ling (with comments)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases a sound file of the Jamaican Dancehall song "Tinga linga ling". Selected comments from that YouTube sound file's viewer comment thread and other information about this song also included in this post.

As a bonus feature, this post also includes a foot stomping cheer entitles "Tinga Linga Ling" that I collected in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the 1990s.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

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FEATURED EXAMPLE: Shabba Ranks - Ting-A-ling



ShabbaRanksVEVO, Uploaded on Oct 25, 2009

Music video by Shabba Ranks performing Ting-A-ling. (C) 1992 SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT
-snip-
Click http://lyrics.wikia.com/Shabba_Ranks:Ting-A-Ling for lyrics to this song.

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SELECTED COMMENTS
From http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wH_0_pijbZY

WARNING: In part because of Shabba Ranks public comments against homosexuals, many of the comments on this video's YouTube viewer comments include profanity and homophobia. These comments also include insults about the singer's physical appearance, explicit sexual references, and other references that I consider to be inappropriate for this blog.)

All of these comments were posted in 2013.

"Hes talking about the "don" of reggae dancehall of the 90's - Ninjaman. Could also refer to Supercat, but the amonst the greatest fueds of the time was one between Ninja and Shabba, so its safe to assume its Ninjaman."
-AliMD76
-snip-
This comment probably refers to these lyrics from "Tinga linga ling":
"Shabba Rankin' disappear wid di half ah annada man chin through.
Dem a di don, to di biz we av di key
Put di don to di key and turn him inna donkey.”]

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"Loved this back in the day, a time when kids could sing dancehall. Big up shabba x"
-UK1DROP

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"Grew up to this icon in Jamaica him a di bossssssss"
-Larone

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"being a jamaican-american shabba ranks is played at every jamaican party bruh"
-Micheal Meadley

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Editor: A lot of commenters wrote that they learned about Shabba Ranks as a result of rapper ASAP Ferg. Shabba Ranks is mentioned & some of the lyrics from the Shabba's song "Tinga ling a ling" are used in one of ASAP Ferg's x rated rap. Here are some examples of those comments:

"Ferg brought me here. Shabba kept me here."
-HesterDW

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"If you had to listen to Asap Ferg to learn who Shabba Ranks is... that's a problem"
-Elidatkid

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"I don't see how its so bad that people didn't know who Shabba Ranks was until A$AP Ferg dropped Shabba if anything you should be happy people found his music so it can reach more people"
-Sam King

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"Everyone loves to brag about knowing Ranks before Ferg dropped the song....That's cool, but why bash those who came to listen to a little Ranks because of Ferg? He payed homage to one of the greatest dancehall artist and therefore shining a little light on my generation by introducing Mr.Ranks."
-Andrew Kidd

Reply

"True that then they can go back even further and check out Rocksteady, Ska, and Dub. Lot's of great music came from the soundsystem culture."
-Johnny B. Goode

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"i freaking love how he says BOOYAKA BOOYAKA!"
-Andy Lopez
-snip-
"Ting-a-ling a ling, schoolbell a ring, knife and fork ah fight fi dumplin...

Booyaka! Booyaka! call for Shabba Rankin"

This is part of the lyrics that were used in an American foot stomping cheer. The words to that cheer are given in the comment section below.

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"I knew him from the Tribe Called Quest line: "listen to shabba ranks, collect my banks" "
-Mac Wood
-snip-
the Tribe Called Quest is a Hip Hop group.
"Banks"=banknotes [money]

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"I always heard this guy's music whenever people were bumping dancehall at a party but I didn't even know his name or who he was. Got to thank Ferg for that."
-VinWizzy

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OLD SCHOOL!!!
-TwoEpicMinersUK
-snip-
"Old school" is an African American originated slang term which usually positively refers to music, dance, fashion, etc. that was in style years ago.

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"i cant understand him but i like the beat"
-eli money

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"besides bob marley, shabba ranks is the pioneer to bring raggae internationally"
-G Kay

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"We were crazy about Shabba in Zimbabwe!!"
-sm197702

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This was my song back in the day. Reggae and dance hall music was so hot in the 90s.. I miss that show Carribean Rhythms.
-pinkdiamondrochee

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ALWAYS SANG THIS SONG GROWING UP AND STILL DO TILL THIS DAY DON'T MATTER WHO BROUGHT YOU HERE OR WHAT DID MUSIC IS GREAT SHABBA ONE LOVE.
-Denton Pearce

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BONUS: TINGA LINGA LING FOOT STOMPING CHEER
All: Ting a ling a ling
School bells ring
Booyaka! Booyaka!
Soloist: And Rhonda sings*.
-Tazi.M. Powell; (African American female, memories of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, early 1990s);
-snip-
The foot stomping cheer begins again with the next soloist, and continues until every member of the group has had a turn as soloist.
The soloist's name or nickname is the last line of the cheer.

Repeat from the beginning with a new soloist who says her name or nickname & does a short foot stomping step. The cheer then begins again with the next soloist. This pattern continues until everyone in the group has had one turn as the soloist.

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Thanks to Shabba Rank's musical legacy.

Thanks also to the publishers of this featured video and thanks to all those whose comments are quoted in this post.

Thank you for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

1 comment:

  1. Here's a foot stomping cheer from the early 1990s [Pittsburgh, Pennslyvania] that I collected from my daughter:

    TING A LING A LING
    All: Ting a ling a ling
    School bells ring
    Booyaka! Booyaka!
    Soloist: And Rhonda sings*.
    -snip-
    The foot stomping cheer begins again with the next soloist, and continues until every member of the group has had a turn as soloist.
    -Tazi.M. Powell; (African American female, memories of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, early 1990s)

    [The soloist's name or nickname is the last line of the cheer.

    Repeat from the beginning with a new soloist who says her name or nickname & does a short foot stomping step. The cheer then begins again with the next soloist. This pattern continues until everyone in the group has had one turn as the soloist.

    This cheer is based on lyrics from Shabba Rank's Dancehall Reggae song "Tinga ling a ling".

    Click http://cocojams.com/content/foot-stomping-cheers-0 for information and more examples of foot stomping cheers.

    ReplyDelete