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Thursday, March 21, 2013

Bajan Folk Song - Every Time She Pass (The Sandpipe Song) with Lyrics

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post showcases a video of & lyrics to the Bajan (Barbados) folk song "Everytime She Pass" (also known as The Sandpipe Song).

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Update: Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/08/caribbean-folk-song-everytime-ah-pass.html for another post on this song. From most of the comments about this song that I've read online, "Everytime Ah Pass" may have originally been form Trinidad & Tobago.

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FEATURED VIDEO
Every Time She Pass (The Standpipe Song) - Sing Out Barbados



bajanmusicfan,Published on Mar 13, 2012

Sweet Bajan Folk music from the 60's and 70's.

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LYRICS - EVERY TIME SHE PASS (THE SANDPIPE SONG]
[Bajan Folk Song]

[to moderately fast tempo]
Men- Every day she come down here.
She lookin so good, good.
And every time she pass by here
I like to touch-a she boomsie.
I like to touch-a she boomsie.

Men- Everyday she come down here.
She lookin so good, good.
And every time she pass by here

I like- a touch-a she boomsie.
I like- a touch-a she boomsie.
I like- a touch-a she boomsie.
I like- a touch-a she boom-

[moderately slow tempo]
Lead female - Every time I pass they pull at me.
Every time I pass they pull at me.
I’m gonna to tell me mama don't send me down there.
[Men overlapping after the word “gonna”] – Tell she mama, don’t send she down here.
Lead female- I’m gonna to tell me mama don't send me down there.

Lead female - Every time I pass they trouble me.
Every time I pass they trouble me.
I’m gonna tell me Mamma don't send me down there.
[Men overlapping after the word “gonna”] – Tell she mama, don’t send she down here.
Lead female- I’m gonna tell me Mamma don't send me down there.

Females: Every time she pass you trouble she.
Every time she pass you trouble she.

[to moderately fast tempo]
Females- I’m gonna tell she mama don't send she down there.

Men - Tell she mama don't send she down here.
Females - I’m gonna tell she mama don't send she down there.
Men - Tell she mama don't send she down here.

[to moderately fast tempo]
Every day she come down here
She lookin so good, good.
And every time she pass by here
She make me feel good, good.
Tell she mama come down here.
Females- You trouble she.
Male-Tell she auntie come down here.
Males-Tell she sister come down here
Females- You trouble she.
Males- And every time she pass by here.
Females –You trouble she.
Men-Tell she mama don’t send her down here.
Females – I’m gonna tell she mama don’t send she down there.
Lead singer [with other females]- Tell me mama don’t send me down there.

[to moderately slow tempo]
Lead female- Every time I pass they clap at me.
Every time I pass they clap at me.
Males – [clap their hands]
Females- You clap at she. You clap at she.
Lead female – Every time I pass they clap at me.
Males – [clap their hands]
Females- You clap at she. You clap at she.
Lead female –I’m gonna tell me Mamma don't send me down there.
[Men overlapping after the word “gonna”] – Tell she mama, don’t send she down here.
Lead female –I’m gonna tell me Mamma don't send me down there.
[Men overlapping after the word “gonna”] – Tell she mama, don’t send she down here.

[to moderately fast tempo]
Every day she come down here
She lookin so good, good.
And every time she pass by here
She make me feel good, good.
Tell she mama come down here.
Females- You trouble she.
Male-Tell she auntie come down here.
Males-Tell she sister come down here
Females- You trouble she.
Males-And as she come by here.
Females –You trouble she.
Men-Tell she mama don’t send her down here.
Females – I’m gonna tell she mama don’t send she down there.
Lead singer [with other females]- Tell me mama don’t send me down there.

[same pattern] - “you teases she”

Ends with alternating males and females singing several times with moderately fast tempo:
Males -Tell she mama don’t send she down here
Females- I’m gonna tell she mama don’t send she down there.
-snip-
Transcription by Azizi Powell. Additions & corrections welcome.
*boomsie=butt, booty

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RELATED LINK
Click http://crs-sato.tripod.com/bajanopera.html "Songs for Bajan Opera" for another text version of (lyrics to) this song. That link also includes other Bajan folk songs.

Also, click this link to a page on my cultural blog which includes videos and text versions of other Caribbean folk songs: http://cocojams.com/content/caribbean-folk-songs.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AND THANKS
Thanks to the composer of this song, and thanks to the vocalists and musicians who are featured in these videos. My thanks also to the publisher of this video.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.


5 comments:

  1. For what it's worth, I'm African American, but my maternal grandmother was Bajan (and my maternal grandfather was Trini).

    Unfortunately, I've not yet been to either of those nations.

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    I'm curious why an alternative title for this song is "The Sandpipe Song".

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    On a serious note, I think that men can admire a female without being obnoxious & too verbally or physically demanding about it.

    It's my strongly felt opinion that it would be very inappropriate for men to attempt to touch a female's "boomsie" just because they found her attractive. Men might think that what we in the USA refer to as making "cat calls" at females is a compliment. But, as this song documents, females have long been troubled by it.

    All too often men "cat calling" makes females feel that they aren't safe. And, it seems to me, that is the opposite of what real males want.

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  2. Nice blog...keep it up! Im from Barbados!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your comment Total-Truth.

      Btw, my maternal grandmother was from Barbados, but I've not had the pleasure of visiting that nation or any other Caribbean nation yet.

      My grandmother's maiden name was "Nurse". Someone told me that that's a common last name in Barbados. Is that true?

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    2. Yes it is a popular name here in Barbados, and it may be called the stand pipe song because it was were you went to collect you household supply of water and this was before there was running water to the houses. It was also the gather point for a lot of the villagers. If you can get an idea of exactly where your granny came from I may be able to do a little research for you.

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    3. Thanks, Wayne Ifill for your information about this song.

      Thanks also for your confirmation about what I had been told about my grandmother's maiden name. I appreciate your offer to research information about my maternal family. However, the only information that I know is that she was from Bridgetown, the capital of Barbados. She married my grandfather who was from Tobago (I think) and whose last name was "Manning" . My grandparents immigrated to New Jersey with their five sons in the early to mid 1920s. My mother and three other siblings was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

      That's all the biographical information that I have, but I have lots of wonderful memories of my grandparents and that means a lot to me.

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